All posts tagged GTi

Feature Listing Updates – New Lower Prices on Survivor GTi and Low Mile Corrado

The seller of the two recent fan-favorite Volkswagens has been in touch and lowered the price on both offerings; the GTi is now listed at $6,500 and the Corrado is listed at $12,500. He’s included links to more photos on each car, as well.

You can contact the seller if you’re interested directly at jimmyzslc@yahoo.com.

Click Here For The GTI Post

Year: 1984
Model: GTi
Engine: 1.8 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 104,500 mi
Price: $6,500

Click Here For Additional GTI Photos

Click Here For The Corrado Post

Year: 1992
Model: Corrado SLC
Engine: 2.8 liter VR6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,750 mi
Price: $12,500

Click Here For Additional Corrado Photos

-Carter

Feature Listing: 1984 Volkswagen GTi – REVISIT

You may remember this great looking, original and rare color combination GTi from last week. Although the car sold, the buyer failed to come through, so you get a second chance to pick up this awesome timepiece of history. Opportunities to own what many consider legendary cars don’t come along often, and usually aren’t very cheap – but these original GTis if left unmolested and in good shape like this one are near certain to appreciate over the coming years and offer you the chance to drive one of the best regarded cars ever made without breaking the bank. This car has some unbelievable records including a handwritten log from the first day of ownership by the original owner, and outside of the replaced windshield and gas cap, and a few mechanical parts is 100% OEM. This is a truly impressive survivor, and the seller has extensive shots that document the condition both above and below the car.

You can contact the seller if you’re interested directly at jimmyzslc@yahoo.com.

Click Here For Additional GTI Photos

Isn’t it amazing how far cars have come? Just yesterday, I was walking with my wife and we were talking about the cost of living today versus when our parents were our age. Certain things are significantly more expensive proportionate to what income was then; housing, for example, and utilities are – at least where we live – much more expensive than when our parents were young. In the early 1980s, the housing market was such that an average amount of money today would have bought you a real mansion – or in some cases, you could have easily owned two or three houses for the same amount as a not particularly extravagant home today. But then you turn to computers, phones, and music technology – remember the CD collection that you used to have? Or perhaps it’s taking up shelf space or boxes in the attic while you walk around with all of the music you can ever listen to on a device that’s smaller than your hand and cost only about a fifth of what a CD player cost new. But technology hasn’t just improved our musical library – technology has made cars safer, faster, and more luxurious – but amazingly, not more expensive. Sure, the dollar figures are higher and it’s worth a laugh looking at the original sticker price of this GTi; a paltry $10,300 in 1984. You can’t even buy a new car for that amount today! Of course, factor in inflation, though, and that $10,300 roughly equates to the best part of $24,000. Guess how much a base GTi costs today? I’ll save you some time….$24,395 gets you a base GTi. But base doesn’t mean what it used to – the “base” model comes with a 210 horsepower turbocharged inline-4, LED foglights, 18″ wheels, iPod connectivity, a touch screen radio, trip computer, and heated front seats – not to mention that things like power windows, air condition and power steering are all standard items now. Sure, as enthusiasts we can decry the nanny-state decreasing our connection with driving through technology and isolation, but ultimately the new GTi is just better at being a car than the original GTi was. It’s faster, turns better, stops better, is more comfortable, can carry more, gets better fuel mileage and is safer. Technology has helped this all occur with no real change in price, amazingly. Yet, we still look longingly at those old GTis, nostalgic for the days that you could toss a car around at 10/10ths without really even breaking laws:

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1984 Volkswagen GTi

It’s not often that lightning strikes twice, but today we get to look at another well preserved first generation GTi. Last week I highlighted an example with a bit more patina but well presented; today’s car is another one that we’ve written up that defies belief. There’s a reason that these cars are so well regarded by the automotive press and automotive fans; they’re amazing cars that make you smile. They punch far outside of their weight class – a do-everything automobile, most people that have owned them (this author included) drove them with aplomb – clipping apexes and lifting wheels, nearly daily redline-runs and antagonizing every “sports” car you could find. That likely explains why so few remain in the condition of this car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen GTi on eBay

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1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Truck Turbo Diesel

What price would you be willing to pay for perfection? For most people, restoring a car is more a labor of love than a prudent investment. First there’s the massive amount of time that you need to invest to make the car right; presuming it doesn’t have massive body damage or corrosion, even what many would consider only a reasonable paint job will still cost thousands of dollars. Then there are the countless trim items that need to be replaced, seats and carpeting. Do them right and you’re looking at several thousand dollars more. Move to the suspension, brakes and drive line and another few thousand dollars will be gone. At the end, you’ll receive a disproportionately small amount of kudos for the large amount of effort and cash that you’ve infused into your project. But, it’s a labor of love – so it doesn’t matter that no one else appreciates your work, right? That’s why it’s so strange when these projects go up for sale:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Truck Turbo Diesel on eBay

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2004 Volkswagen R32

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It’s been a while since I’ve fantasized about the R32. For a long time, it was my dream car, packing AWD with a sweet (and sweeter sounding) VR6 in the attractive (to me) Mk4 Golf package. They sound great and are very capable, but have had enough mechanical issues to have some detractors. I’ll continue dreaming though, thinking of the VR6’s terrifying growl, the 4Motion’s capability, and the hatchback sensibility. For a long time they were hovering around $20k, and you might still pay that much if you find a cherry low-mileage example, but today’s has covered 117k miles and is thus an extremely reasonable $13k.

Click for details: 2004 Volkswagen R32 on eBay

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