1970 Mercedes-Benz 220D

1970 Mercedes-Benz 220D

The W114 and W115 is looked at as the generation that came before the legendary W123 came along and cemented itself as one of the best vehicles ever produced.  It’s not that the Stroke 8 are bad or anything, it’s just a tough comparison head to head against the W123. If anything, the W114/115 should be lauded as those cars featured the OM616 and non-turbocharged OM617 before being carried over into the new W123 chassis. Now that the newest W115 is 41 years old, a really nice one is hard to come by given they were used for all they had to give then tossed away due to their lack of collectibility. So when this 1970 220D for sale in Florida popped up, I had to take a closer look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Mercedes-Benz 220D on eBay

Year: 1970
Model: 220D
Engine: 2.2 inline-4
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 95,337 mi
Price: Buy It Now $8,900

Runs and drive very good no rust well maintained super clean – – – kept garage and covered
– 4 new tires
– new door seals
– new drive mirror glass
– new pillar seals
– new trunk seal
– new cv axle boot left and right
– new diesel filter
– 4 new brake hose
– new front brake pads
– new injection pump membrane diaphragm
– turn signails,break lights, headlights, high beams works without problems
recent oil change transmission oil change

title in hands

any question you can send a message

I can’t believe how great this car looks for 95,000 miles. The exterior shows fairly well but the interior and engine bay are nearly flawless. Either this car underwent a light restoration or the owner was fanatical about keeping it in perfect condition. Usually these cars are used as workhorses and don’t get pampered but this one is on another level.…

Feature Listing: 1979 BMW 323i Baur TC1

Feature Listing: 1979 BMW 323i Baur TC1

When enthusiasts think of custom coachwork and Germany, one name usually springs to mind: Karmann. Most identifiable for their combination with Ghia’s designs for Volkswagen, Karmann produced not only their eponymous creation Karmann-Ghia in both Type 14 and Type 34 configuration, but also the Beetle convertible. Volkswagen’s association didn’t end there, though, as the first Rabbit Cabriolets, both versions of the original Scirocco and the later Corrado were all built by the firm. So, too, were some of the first Porsche 356, 911 and 912 models, along with the 914. BMW, too, turned to the firm for ‘Big Coupe’ production, from the 2000CS to the E24 6-series. But when it came time to take the top off of their small cars, BMW looked elsewhere.

From Osnabrück BMW headed into the heart of the enemy’s home to Stuttgart, where Karosserie Baur was located. Baur was the company that BMW turned to when plans with Lamborghini to produce the supercar M1 fell through. Baur would later be the home that the infamous Group B Sport Quattro and Porsche 959 were produced in. In short, Baur was responsible for some of the most significant designs in German motoring and has plenty of expertise in factory-quality experience. It should come as no surprise, then, that they were the company that BMW selected to produce the first 3-series convertibles.

Taking the roof off the car seems simple enough; just grab a saw and go, ‘How hard could it be?’ Well, not so fast, as structural rigidity rears its ugly head. Beyond that, in the 1970s government nannies were indicating that the idea of a topless car was going to be outlawed, leading many manufacturers – including all of the major U.S. brands – to abandon the idea. Baur’s solution to the problem was to create a roll hoop ‘Targa’ model, which as we know from Porsche models offered multiple roof positions while simultaneously solving the issue of structural rigidity and occupant safety.…

1980 BMW M1

1980 BMW M1

In an article I penned for The Truth About Cars last week, I covered some of the development of the Wedge Era and how those spectacular show car designs channeled their design language down to more pedestrian models. One of the stars of that article were the cutting-edge looks from Giugiaro’s ItalDesign – the firm, and man, responsible for some of your favorites such as the basic shape for the Audi Quattro. But while the Quattro launched its brand into the luxury realm and redefined the 80s, the undisputed German star of the wedgey wonders was the BMW M1.

Like the Quattro, the M1 redefined and refined BMW’s core mission, helping to launch the Motorsport division along with the 3.0 CSL and 2002 Turbo. While Giugiaro had also had his hand in the M1’s design, the genesis of the shape lay in the much earlier Paul Bracq designed Turbo concept. Bracq, in turn, had undoubtedly been influenced by the late 1960s creations of both Giorgetto Giugiaro (at Ghia and ItalDesign) and Marcello Gandini (Bertone), as well as the efforts and splash rival Mercedes-Benz had made in 1969 with the C111 concept and record setter.

But while Daimler was hesitant to enter serial production with such a departure from their tried and true sedan designs, the M1 proved to be just the spark BMW was looking for to ignite the fire in driving enthusiast’s minds. It was, at the time, the Ultimate Driving Machine:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 BMW M1 on eBay

1972 Mercedes-Benz 250C

1972 Mercedes-Benz 250C

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Kick back and relax now that the work week is over because I need some time to unpack everything that this 1972 Mercedes-Benz 250C is bringing today. At first glance I was excited to see a W114 coupe in awesome 860 green and to my surprise it was a four-speed manual as well. Then I started reading the description and looking at the photos to realize this car had much more than what I saw on the surface. So let’s dive into this 1972 250C located in Washington.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 Mercedes-Benz 250C on eBay

1977 BMW 630CSi

1977 BMW 630CSi

I’ve said a few times that the prettiest 6-series in my mind are the earliest examples and the very last, mid-88 refreshed cars. But in terms of pure beauty, my vote still goes to the early, uncluttered Bracq design. Certainly the E24 looked much heavier and not quite as elegant as the E9 it replaced, but it has its own character and was a quite handsome design in its own right. The sweeping roof line carries perfectly into the falling trunk, and in front the chiseled headlight panel echoed images of the creatures that would become the namesake of this model – the “Shark”:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 630CSi on eBay

Double Take: Original and Extra Spicy 1977 BMW 630CSis

Double Take: Original and Extra Spicy 1977 BMW 630CSis

Earlier in the week I wrote up a pristine, lower mile E12 528i that was a very pretty color combination and rare to see. The early generation cars of the 1980s – the E12, early E24 and E21 – are still in collector no man’s land; they’re in general not sought after enough to justify expensive restorations, and they’re not valuable enough for people to keep in pristine condition. They’re also not the best performers that BMW has produced; but in spite of that they’re all pretty cars and when well presented it’s a reminder of how clean and desirable some of these early BMW designs were. Few are as pretty as the original Paul Bracq designed E24 with it’s low, lean and long stance. Bespoilered later in life the design become increasingly cluttered and more aggressive, and while that has a certain appeal the early cars really do express the original design better. Today there are two examples, surprisingly, of the early run 630CSi – in your choice of original or modified “extra-spicy”. Which would you prefer? Let’s start with the modified version:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 630CSi on eBay

Shark Week: 1977 BMW 630CS

Shark Week: 1977 BMW 630CS

The BMW E9 chassis was a tough act to follow; gorgeous simplicity, solid performance in street trim and a world contender and winner in the European Touring Car Championship. The E9 was also the basis for the first two BMW “Art Cars”, bringing the maker to a new medium and market. Clearly, Paul Bracq had his work cut out for him designing a replacement, but if he hadn’t already, he would prove himself more than worthy. The E24 launched in 1976, and like the Porsche 928, the design would prove to be advanced for the time.

Initially available in Europe as the carbureted 3.0 630CS, over its production run the E24 gained horsepower, luxury, sprouted spoilers and larger wheels, and became a serious performance machine in M6 guise. Few U.S. enthusiasts even remember the 633CSi, never mind the fuel injected version of the 3.0 that introduced the U.S. to the E24 in 630CSi form. Perhaps that’s because the emissions equipment that was fitted robbed the car of performance, but to me, the prettiest of the E24s are the early, simple cars without the all the spoilers. Thanks to the grey market, a few of the carbureted 3.0 CSs made it to the U.S.. Even fewer survive today thanks mostly to rust and depreciation, but occasionally one of the original sharks surface, like today’s very rare 630CS:

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Year: 1977
Model: 630CS
Engine: 3.0 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 42,000 mi
Price: $9,900

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 630CS on Classiccar.com

BMW 630 CS Coupe, Black, for sale in Griffin, Georgia, for $15,900. Exterior paint finished in Schwarz Black complemented by a Saddle leather interior. It is truly in mint, pristene condition, both mechanically & cosmetically with just 42,000 miles. Features 4-speed manual transmission, factory a/c, chrome alloy wheels, power antenna, rear power windows, Clarion am-fm cassette radio, coco mats.