Double Take: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS – Black or White?

This will be a study of complete contrasts. Light and dark. Two examples of the 997 GT3 RS that look equally stunning, but achieve that through entirely different means. One is paint to sample, the other a standard color. Both are somewhat rarely seen in this form, though in the case of the white RS it is more the lack of adornment that produces that rarity.

I had seen this paint-to-sample Black GT3 RS previously and knew I would want to take a closer look. Then I forgot about it. When I came back around to it a Carrara White GT3 RS had also come up for sale. White and Black: neither color is much outside the norm for most cars, but the GT3 RS is not like most cars. Black even was a paint-to-sample option, which almost beggars belief. Let’s take a look at that peculiarly rare black example first:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: PTS Black 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition

For reasons I can’t quite put my finger on I’m quite attracted to Porsche’s Rennsport Reunion 911. While not really in the sort of colors I tend to prefer there is something great about the overall package and when I see one I definitely take notice. The Rennsport Reunion Edition served to commemorate the fifth Rennsport Reunion held at Laguna Seca Raceway in September 2015. It is a showcase of Porsche racecars from throughout its history.

We are sometimes hard on Porsche for its constant commemorative and special edition 911s. In most cases they just seem like another way to move some cars and in truth that’s probably the primary intent. But I will say this, in more recent years these special editions have been produced in very limited numbers. If you’re going to make something special, then you might as well go all out. The Rennsport Reunion Edition 911 is no different: only 25 were made. If you want one opportunities can be fleeting.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition on eBay

1988 Porsche 944 ‘Celebration’ Special Edition

In my recent double Porsche 924 post, the rhetorical and problematic question posing entry-level Porsches arose – ‘why not just get a 944’?

It’s a very valid question. Indeed, why would you choose a 924 – even a very nice, limited production one – over a 944? The answer is simple. Price.

When the 924S Special Edition was last on the market in 1988, you could stroll down to your dealer and pick one up for around $23,000. If you wanted to step up to the 944 – which offered no practical improvement in performance, mind you, as it was actually slower than the 924S – you’d have to shell out an additional $10,000. In many ways, that gulf of value perception remains today; it’s possible to find deals on 944s, but equal 944s to the two 924s I looked at? They don’t come cheap, at least not in asking price.

Yet while I’ve spent considerable time talking about the 924S Special Edition and what a cool package it offered you on the cheap, we never really look at its 944 equivalent. Often referred to as the ‘Celebration Edition’, just like the 911 and 924S the 944 received a Special Edition package in 1988. Built to commemorate the 250,000th 911 produced but coinciding with 100,000 944s made, too, Porsche officially referred to the 944’s trim as the “Special Edition Package”. What did you get?

For $2,437, Porsche equipped your car with option code M757. This gave the car “a unique leatherette/gray-plaid cloth interior, silver velour carpeting, and a commemorative plaque which may be personalized with the owner’s name” according to Porsche. You also had to select metallic paint, a $645 charge, in one of two colors; Satin Black Metallic or Zermatt Silver Metallic. Otherwise these cars were pretty well loaded; the antithesis of the lightweight, stripped-down 924S SE.…

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I suppose it’s a testament to how much I like the classic 911 that I can spend nearly as much time looking over the details of a 911 like this one as I do with the various exotic, rare, and/or high performance 911s I also feature. As I’ve said before those high-dollar 911s are great and they’re great to look at and ponder, but when it really comes down to a 911 I might enjoy spending a lot of time with I invariably come back to the ’80s.

Whether you prefer the 911SC or the 3.2 Carrera largely is a matter of preference and in many cases can be a matter of availability. The two models share enough useful characteristics that a good one from either model is better than one that’s a little lackluster. There are certainly differences and for those who might want more certainty about its value the later G50-equipped models do make a little more sense. Otherwise, find the one you like! Perhaps this one: a Guards Red 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa, located in Illinois, with Black interior and 47,903 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

Face Off: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo v. 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

Increasingly as some of our childhood (or, adulthood) heroes get priced out of sensibility for weekend warrior on a budget status, there are still some bastions of hope for the shoestring enthusiast. One of the best must undoubtedly be the underrated Porsche 924. As Sciroccos, GTIs, 944 Turbos, Quattros and the like take off in value, here lies a plethora of well-cared for, well-built and fun-to-drive cars that have good parts accessibility, reasonable repair costs and surprising amounts of practicality. Sure, it’s ‘just’ a 924, and Porschephiles will probably poo-poo your choice. So, too, will most of the rest of the automotive world. Their loss is your gain. Try as they might, outside of some very special 924 Carreras, these models that helped to keep Porsche afloat in the 1970s and 1980s still haven’t caught on with collectors.

So today I have two special 924s to consider once again. The first is a lofty Turbo model; finicky even in period, they’ve developed a reputation for lack of reliability and expensive repairs, but then have you ever seen the bill on a proper flat-6 rebuild? I’m going to compare it to the end-of-the-run 924S, and this one is the lightweight Special Edition model, too. Both are quite affordable and both appear to be in great condition, so which one is the winner?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay

Paint-to-Sample 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet

It appears my attempt to stay within the realm of good value has only lasted a day. We’ll try again tomorrow. In the meantime here’s something very unique: a paint-to-sample Orange 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet. It is said to be the only one produced in this color for the 1965 model year. I can’t confirm that myself, but it is one of only two 356 of any model that I’ve seen painted Orange. The other, while also a Cabriolet, was from 1955 so it certainly doesn’t impact the 1-of-1 status of this 356. It has been fully restored and that eye-popping orange looks stunning on the 356’s curves. There were a good many bright colors available during 356 production, but I don’t think any would be as head turning as this.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet on Excellence Magazine

2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

I’ve been featuring a fair number of very high-priced 911s of late. I certainly love them and in most cases their rarity earns them the feature. But for most of us those cars always will exist well out of reach and merely as pieces to admire in someone else’s collection. There is also the problem that in most cases you really can’t even drive the darn things.

This 911 should possess none of those issues and while certainly not cheap as second-hand cars go there’s nice value to be had here within the realm of the 911 itself. Here we have a Speed Yellow 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe, located in California, with 6-speed manual transmission and 33,750 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe on eBay

2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 – Radio Delete

I don’t think I need to belabor this one. After all it wasn’t that long ago that I featured a GT3 RS 4.0. That particular example was quite special in that it was one of the very rare paint-to-sample 4.0s that were built. This one is not paint to sample, but it does provide its own special features. And a very high price to match!

This is a Carrara White Metallic 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0, located in Houston, that is one of the handful that was optioned without the audio system. Also, it sits with only 15 miles on it. Yes, 15.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 on eBay

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

I’ve been on a little bit of a 930 run lately so let’s continue that. This one isn’t a Slantnose, though it does look a little sad. And I mean that in a fully anthropomorphized sense. I think we can see why so many owners replace the standard headlamps. It does have the rear quarter vents and strakes like the Slantnose and it’s when we get into these areas that my interest rises.

This 930 presents us with a little bit of a puzzle. At least, it does if you’re like me and thinking about 911 values and markets and whatnot. The seller goes to great lengths about this being a show car. At first, I wasn’t sure what he was on about and why the insistence on mentioning it. A lot of older 911s and 930s appear at these events. That’s where the puzzle begins: This 930 isn’t in the vain of a SEMA-style show car, but it isn’t a regular 930 either. It’s modifications aren’t hugely significant, but they do seem purposeful and intended to attract a certain level of attention. The mileage is quite low and it looks in really good condition. The show car emphasis then began to make sense to me. The question I wondered: will prospective buyers have a similar level of appreciation?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

2016 Porsche Cayman GT4

I was torn over whether to feature this car. It has some very alluring attributes: not only is it the performance obsessed Cayman GT4, but it comes in a fairly rare Carrara White Metallic exterior. The mileage remains fairly low and the price isn’t too bad relative to most examples of the GT4 I’ve seen. Not everything is great though. First, someone has stuck a bunch of decals on it. We’re also not told much about it. Most of those details can likely be worked out given this is a nearly new car. It’s said to be accident free, which is good, but there’s probably more to look through here than the typical GT4 for sale. Nonetheless, I think the exterior color is an important consideration on its own. I’ve seen very few GT4s in white so those on the lookout for one likely will want to put in the legwork to figure out the details.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 on eBay