2010 Porsche Cayenne S Transsyberia

In one of the more bizarre models in Porsche history, we have the Cayenne S Transsyberia. What the heck is it? The Transsyberia Rally was known as a “raid rally” that ran from 2007-2009 that started in Moscow and ended in Mongolia. No big deal, right? Well considering you had to drive through Ural and Altai mountains, the Mongolian plains, the Gobi Desert, and whatever else Siberia could offer up it wasn’t so easy. The route was roughly 4,500 miles long and needless to say not every vehicle that started ended up finishing. Some stages we so dangerous they would just end up getting cancelled all together. Porsche offered assistance with a handful of Cayennes – 25 of 34 registered teams drove them to be exact – all being slightly modified production vehicles. After realizing that this marketing event really didn’t appeal to anyone, Porsche pulled the plug on factory support.

However, someone sitting in a cubical in Stuttgart came up with the brilliant idea to slap a few stickers and extra paint on some Cayennes and call it the “Transsyberia Edition”. Thankfully it wasn’t just some cosmetics, it did feature the 410 horsepower engine from the GTS and some extra skid plates for all the gravel parking lots at the soccer fields. Porsche made 600 of these in total, with 102 coming to North America. Four colors were offered, black with orange accents, silver with orange accents, black with grey highlights, and grey with silver highlights. Today’s example up for sale in Alabama of all places, is the least offensive of the colors offered: grey with silver highlights.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2010 Porsche Cayenne S Transsyberia on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

Did you love last weeks Porsche 911 GT3 Touring painted in Brewster Green but maybe thought to yourself, “I need more excitement?” Well, don’t worry, because Porsche can fix that for you. This is a 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS painted in, you guessed it, Brewster Green. What exactly is it? A 3.8 liter twin-turbocharged flat-6 delivering 700 hp sent to the rear wheels via Porsche’s 7-speed PDK transmission. Compared to a Turbo S, it is 286 pounds lighter. This car has the $18,000 Weissach package which means you lose another 40 pounds thanks to a bunch of carbon fiber. Also, don’t forget the $13,000 magnesium wheels. The 0-60 time? 2.6 seconds. Quarter mile? 10.3 seconds. Can you drive it work on Monday morning? Yes. Will all of your co-workers hate you with envy? Also yes.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT2 RS on Rennlist

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1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic

During my many miles of walking I do during the week, I run through a lot of hypothetical car purchasing situations. One of those recently was “how much of a discount would you need to buy and own a (pre-PDK) automatic 911?” While certainly not the most common 911s, there are a handful of these traditional automatic gearboxes on the 964, 993, and 996. The 964 and 993 had a 4-speed, while the 996 gained an extra 5th gear. All featured “Tiptronic”, a term Porsche coined and owns, that allows you to select what gear you wanted to be in within some limitations. Most often people who bought these automatic gearboxes were those with a physical limitation who couldn’t drive 3-pedals or the old saying of “so my significant other can drive it too” when in reality that maybe happens twice a year and one of those times is driving it from the garage to the street because the driveway was getting resealed.

Naturally these cars didn’t just go off and disappear because they still have a ton of value, but you’d be kidding if you think all things being equal they would be priced the same as a manual gearbox car. Yes, the look, sound, and feel of an aircooled 911 is still there, but these older ZF gearboxes suck up the power and you notice it. That is exactly what is going on with today’s car, a 1991 C2. This has all the ingredients for a perfect 964. Amethyst Metallic paint, Speedline wheels, and just under 73,000 miles. Problem is, it has the automatic gearbox. Is the price discount enough to make you overlook that?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Tiptronic on eBay

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1986 Porsche 944 Turbo

I’m a sucker for two things: great deals on underdog cars and crazy color combination. Welcome to today’s 951!

I’m not going to hide my love of the transaxle 4-cylinder Porsches. I think they’re still some of the best deals going in the Porsche world, provided you know where to look. For example, I provided you with a stellar example of a 924S just a few weeks ago:

1987 Porsche 924S with 17,500 Miles

As I mentioned there were two ways to consider that car. On one hand, I don’t think you could get a better condition, lower mileage Porsche for any less. But on the flip side, there were plenty of other cars that were a lot more desirable for similar money. This 944 Turbo is one of the cars that I referenced. Granted, it’s not quite as pristine as the 924S was, but I still think it has a lot to offer:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring

Back at it again with the paint-to-sample! Not to be outdone by last month’s Ruby Star 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring, we have another GT3 Touring painted in a color that I love: Brewster Green. This isn’t quite British Racing Green and could also pass as black when looking at it at night, but it is just green enough for it to stick out. Much like Ruby Star, this color did not come cheap. $12,830 to be exact. Porsche gladly took all that money, sprayed the paint, and smugly said “You should be thankful we allowed you to give us this money.” to the lucky owner for this car. Like last month’s Touring, this car breaks the $200,000 mark for the asking price despite having a sticker price of $195,000. What gives?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring on Rennlist

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2016 Porsche 911R

I think it is safe to say that Porsche 911R drop tower amusement ride is over. Prices started at MSRP, speculators rode the ride up and up, and then Porsche released the GT3 Touring and people lost their wallets on the sudden drop back down because they decided to risk it and not put it in the little bin before strapping in. In all seriousness, the days of $660,000 asking prices for these cars are long gone and won’t return until we are probably all dead. I’m not speculating or just flat out guessing on this, a car with 1,000 miles sold for $280,000 a few months and and we are about to find out what another one with 463 miles will fetch. Given the mileage on those cars, it is safe to say those were bought as “investments” and not to drive. Today’s car, a white with green stripe, is in the same boat. Just 920 miles careful miles. The price? About what you would expect, actually.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911R on eBay

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1987 Porsche 924S with 17,500 Miles

‘The Poor Man’s Porsche’

Not that one would consider the 924 very affordable by the end of the run, mind you – but, then, it was cheap by Porsche standards. In 1986, the Scirocco had grown 8 more valves and was a competent performer – more than the match for most of the competition. Base price had also grown to almost $14,000, and equip one with power options to match its more luxurious Audi and Porsche cousins and suddenly you were close to $16,000 out the door. But it was still a big leap to the Special Build Coupe GT, which crested $21,000 with a few options. While it offered a bit more luxury than the 16V, there wasn’t any improvement in performance from the 130 horsepower NG 2.3 10V. To get more grunt, you had to turn to Porsche.

Porsche’s “budget” 944 had also grown in price, and by ’87 you were looking at – no surprise – a $5,000 increase over the Audi to get a more prestigious badge. The new 16V 944S was even more expensive though it looked no different. So to bring the 944 back to its sub-$20,000 base price roots, Porsche brought back the 924. The car that was originally suppose to be the Scirocco and was, for some time, the bread and butter of Porsche’s sales was a 924 in body only as it now had 944 underpinnings. The Super 924 was therefore a bit of a sleeper, offering slightly better performance than the base 944 due to better aerodynamics of the pure design and lighter weight. Base price was briefly $19,900, so in dealerships that sold both Audi and Porsche products, this was a heads-up competitor to the late GTs. And though they ostensibly had similar missions, they were remarkably different cars. As we’ve recently looked at the Scirocco and Audi, let’s take another gander at what you’re missing with the 924S:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 924S on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1975 Porsche 911 RSR

Let’s say for a moment that you came into an extraordinary amount of money and wanted to go vintage automobile racing. Of course, to prove your worth as an enthusiast, you’ll want to buy a historically significant car that will impress all the long bottom jaws, and few raise more eyebrows in the German realm right now than the 911. Truth told, the 911 is really the ‘new money’ of the vintage world – go try racing antique Bugattis or Ferraris, for example, and you’ll soon laugh at the budgets of Porsche racers…but I digress.

Ironically, there was a point in history where your scenario from today wouldn’t have been all that different from the past. Take the case of Diego Febles. Diego was born in Cuba under the notorious dictator Batista, but left in 1957 for “political reasons” you may have heard of at one point. Finally landing in Puerto Rico, Diego took to racing, and specifically racing Porsches. In the 1970s, this led him to be linked up with Peter Gregg’s Brumos Porsche group, and Diego proceeded to buy and build cars which mimicked Gregg’s famous liveries.

In his own right, Febels was fairly accomplished as a racer. He raced some of the most famous races in the world; of course the 24 Hours of Daytona and the 12 Hours of Sebring were naturals that Gregg and Brumos had excelled at, but he also raced at Road America, Mosport, Mid Ohio and finally even at Le Mans. This particular car is claimed to be his last ‘RSR’, but looks can be deceiving:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR at Atlantis Motor Group

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo

A few weeks ago I took a look at a 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo that was totally normal on outside, but then when you opened the doors things took a left turn. Judging by the comments, I wasn’t alone on this thought. Surprisingly, it sold for nearly $52,000, which I think is a premium for a 2002 Turbo, but it did have only 29,000 miles on it. Today, I came across another 996 Turbo, but as you might have noticed the unusual color is on the outside this time. This 2001 up for sale in New York is painted in Forest Green Metallic and shows nearly 65,000 miles. Problem is, it is much more expensive than the car from a few weeks ago.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo at 6 Speed Online

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2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring

You know why we’re here. This 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring is finished in Paint-to-Sample Ruby Star. Made popular on the 964, this wild color now has a home on the 991 and boy does it pop. The GT3 Touring is already a wildly popular car that is still selling for over sticker with a handful of miles on them, and adding a Paint-to-Sample color like this only piles on the price. The sky was basically the limit on custom options for highly preferred customers to the point where a you could order a GT3 Touring for around $140,000 and then literally add another $140,000 in options. Seriously, someone did that. Thankfully, that isn’t the case with this car but you are still going to pay over sticker for it despite having nearly 1,000 on the odometer. How much?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 GT3 Touring on Rennlist

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