2007 Porsche 911 Turbo

Some days I really like yellow cars. Other days I do not. This might be one of those days I don’t like it. What we are looking at today is a 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo obviously finished in Speed Yellow, but to me it just feels a little too light. I looked at a 2004 GT2 last month that was also in finished in Speed Yellow, but comparing those two cars, they feel totally different to me. Maybe it is just the 996 vs 997 thing, but this Turbo just seems like a real let down to me when it comes to wowing me with the color. Your thoughts?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

If I could find whoever spec’d this car out, I would give them a firm, but polite, handshake to thank them for bringing this car into the world for all of us to enjoy. This 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS up for sale in Northwest Germany is finished in none other than paint-to-sample Irish Green, and boy does it look amazing. Even better, the madmen at Manthey Racing put a few little special touches on this.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS at Early 911s

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1987 Porsche 944 Turbo

Let’s say that instead of just hoping that some day your car will be worth a mint, or indeed even caring what other people think about your vehicular choices, you just want have a car which looks good and is enjoyable to drive. Let’s not forget, this advice is coming from someone with somewhat polarizing vehicle choices…so, take the advice with a grain of salt, but I’m going to persist in my argument that the 944 Turbo is the car for you. A true David of the 1980s, the 944 Turbo was the understated and unassuming Goliath slayer, turned down by the factory so as not to have its performance overshadow the 911 range. Being faster than a 911 is pretty much verboten in Germany and especially in Stuttgart, but nearly everyone that experienced a 944 Turbo in the 1980s came away with the impression that in every statistical (and in some non-statistical ways) it was a better car than the Carrera.

But, as our astute readership has previously noted, certain cars – the Audi Quattro, the BMW M3 and M5, and of course the 911 range – were the cars groups of individuals dream of. The 944 Turbo really wasn’t. There weren’t many people that hung 944 Turbo posters on their walls, because there was always something from Porsche that was a little bit more special – the 928 was more futuristic, the 911 was more comforting as a predictable classic, and “Turbo” was synonymous with only one Porsche in history.

That model wasn’t the 944, nor was it the 924. And though both of those respective cars outperformed their brethren in period and were very impressive outside of the Zuffenhausen lineup, the market of today in many ways continues to mimic the original sales trends. The 944 Turbo outsold the Quattro, outsold the M3 – neither, it should be noted, limited production cars. But today, probably in part because of its success, the 944 Turbo just doesn’t get the wows, the attention, or the press of its contemporaries. Of course, there’s one more thing it doesn’t get as a result – their price:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

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1966 Porsche 912

A few months ago I took a look an early Porsche 912 that while the price was right, had a bunch of issues known and maybe more than weren’t yet found. As luck would have it, another 912 popped up, this time an even earlier car, that has a little high price tag but perhaps is a much better starting point. Dare I say that this is even a turn-key example? I maybe won’t go that far since it is a 1966 after all, but heavy lifting is not required on this one.

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1976 Porsche 911S Coupe Signature Edition

What was the first special edition 911? It seems like the chicken and egg argument, if I’m honest. But certainly in the running must be the 1976 911 Signature Edition. Created to commemorate…Ferry Porsche’s signature, apparently….the Signature Edition treatment was applied to just 200 911s, all of which were finished in Platinum Metallic with color-matched wheels over a brown-beige leatherette and tweed interior. The pièce de résistance was the steering wheel, though, replete with Porsche’s signature embossed in the center. These are rare cars to find in the market today, so it was worth taking a look at this 911S Coupe for sale:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S Coupe Signature Edition on eBay

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2018 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

The winter months are here for some of us, but that won’t stop the seemingly never-ending offerings of Porsche 911s in wild colors. This 2018 Carrera 4S is finished in the slightly lighter hue of Riviera Blue with the matching brake calipers for extra points. Unlike Miami Blue that is an optional color on the 991 generation, Riviera is only reserved for the paint-to-sample program, so that means tack another $7,000 or so to the sticker. Of course, why stop there when it comes to the options, so a $112,000 base price for a Carrera 4S is now $156,970 when it is all said and done with the options. Now just 6,800 miles later, it is up for sale.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

I don’t mean to harp on the Porsche 996 Carrera 4S so much, but the entire package of what they offer, especially at their current prices, always seem to draw me back in. Whether it be the wide rear end, 18″ Turbo Twist wheels, or the heckblende rear reflector, these cars just seem to do it for me. For what they were working with, I think Porsche nailed this design and pulled just enough pieces from the Turbo to keep you interested, but not so much that it was almost as expensive as the Turbo and no one would bite on it. Now, some 15 years later, this are at the bottom of the price curve and ripe for the picking. Time to snag one?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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2004 Porsche 911 GT2

In terms of the “windowmaker” Porsches, the 996 GT2 certainly seems worthy of that title. Hard to believe that a 996 can be deemed scary, but that is exactly the kind of false confidence that gets you in trouble with these. Having a twin-turbocharged car that will get you to 60 mph in under 4 seconds without the help of traction control or stability control is the perfect combination for the result of “I just lost it” after getting a little too confident. I think Porsche knew this, and as a result only 303 examples of these cars made it to the US from 2002 to 2005. To put that into perspective, that is half of how many Carrera GTs there are.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 GT2 on eBay

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1979 Porsche 935 Kremer K3 Replica

Even though they don’t generally get the big headlines, arguably the Porsche 934 and 935 were the most important car in developing the racing history and reputation of Porsche. While the 356 and early 911s were certainly notable, it was in the mid-1970s with the introduction of turbocharged 911 in 935 form that Porsche developed a sizable following of independents who raced the all-conquering Turbos. In turn, it was these race successes that convinced enthusiasts that the Porsche 930 was THE car to have. The 935 was, in many ways, a development of the earlier 934. Wide flares coupled with wheels and brakes from the prototype category 917 and 936 gave a purposeful and classic look. While the roofline and doors remained effectively the same as the production cars, few other details matched what you could buy at the dealer. One of the biggest developments was the aerodynamic “Slantnose” developed with help from Kremer; it would become the signature look for not only the 935s but also the most expensive versions of the 930 in the 1980s. The 935 also helped breach the gap in between the 917 program and the start of the 956/962; while the 936s were the direct transference between the two, it would be the 935 that would carry the Porsche flag around the world. Amongst the notable wins for the 935 were around 150 international victories including all-out victory at Le Mans in 1979 and multiple wins at both Sebring and Daytona.

So it’s little surprise that there’s no shortage of replicas, and this particular ’69 911 has ended up being a pretty impressive Kremer K3 replica:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 935 Kremer K3 Replica on eBay

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2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition

Usually when manufacturers start pumping out ‘special editions’ it is either at the beginning of the generation or knocking on death’s door as a last grasp to get people to buy the aging model before retooling for the next model. Today, we have the former. This Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 is already a huge hit for Porsche fans as everyone guessed, and the European-market already has a ‘special edition’ to go with it. What is it? The Sports Cup Edition. You might be looking at that photo and thinking it is a track-focused model with a bunch of lightweight parts and more hardcore suspension. That would make total sense, right? Nope. Just some stickers.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2020 Porsche 718 Cayman GT4 Sports Cup Edition at Prestige-Selections

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