1985 Bitter SC 3.9

If you drew an imaginary line between the family trees of the C107 Mercedes-Benz SLC and the E31 BMW 8 Series, therein would lie the somewhat odd but quite interesting Bitter SC. Open the door, and it’s obvious that the Bitter was also the envy of the 1980s Maserati interiors which resulted in the perhaps even more ill-conceived TC by Maserati. But the level of luxury found in the Bitter speaks to a period when personal luxury coupes were all the rage, and most of them were equipped like the SC – full of wood trim, luxurious leather and electronic features, motivated just enough to pass the plebeian Golfs and Mercedes diesels that litter the Autobahn. Of course, in such a luxurious coupe you wouldn’t want to do anything as pedestrian as change your own gear – you’d have people who would do that for you, and Bitter was happy to oblige with it’s Opel (nee GM) derived drivetrain. History has treated these personal luxury coupes fairly poorly; the L6, the SLC and the Bitter SC all have languished in value while their higher-performance or topless cousins have accelerated away into the auction blocks. Perhaps that’s an unfitting tribute for what was a top-flight luxury coupe from the 1980s, one man’s attempt to match the mystique of legendary brands like Ferrari and Mercedes-Benz. It was a noble attempt, but as they say, it’s often lonely at the top:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Bitter SC 3.9 on eBay

1983 911 SC Targa

Another day, another crisp SC Targa found down in Florida. This one is a real head turner as it is covered in rather rare Schwarz Metallic paint. The ad says it can appear Slate Grey in certain light, black or even brown at other times. I think I saw  a 911 with this paint a few years back at a meet but didn’t realize it was so special at the time. Also could have been my eyes playing tricks on me, hard tellin no knowin I suppose.

Anyhow, I thought this ’79 Targa deserved some attention as it features not only a unique exterior but a very clean, very pretty Cork interior. This is certainly among my favorite color combinations for a 911, I think it works particularly well on this era. The leather on the dash and on the front seats is new and the Targa top has been reupholstered with OEM material as well. From a visual stand point this vehicle appears to need nothing and the mechanical side of the equation also seems to be balanced. Brand new tie rods and steering rack boots were recently installed, the seller notes that the A/C squeals at bit at start up but from what I’ve read that’s both rather common on these cars. Whether or not it is an easy fix is beyond me but if it was my car, I would keep the A/C off and the top popped to keep cool.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 911 SC Targa On eBay

1978 Porsche 911 SC Targa

Over the past couple of years my affinity for the Targa 911 models has grown considerably. I’m sure that their position as the “value” model in the classic 911 market has something to do with that as I usually expect a reasonable price tag when I see Targa in the title of a listing. Of course, we’re getting to a point where even these models are commanding a premium due to the insanity spreading across the rest of the lineup. Honestly, I don’t think getting a Targa is settling as much as some 911 enthusiasts would have you think. In fact I’m quite fond of these models these days precisely because they’ve long been the odd man out within vaunted 911 family. Convertible 911s (with the exception of the Slantnose) have never been my thing and never will be, so the Targa is that nice middle ground where I can still get a bit of open air motoring without sacrificing that classic shape I lust after.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 911 SC Targa

1982 Porsche 911 SC

Up until a couple of years ago I could not have cared less about any Porsche that wasn’t a 993. The older models were nothing but slow, featureless tin cans that were driven by orthodontists and euro snobs. Then, almost overnight I became fascinated with the 964, Carrera 3.2 and 911 SC. I dove into Pelican Parts with reckless abandon, started reading blogs dedicated to each generation and more importantly I learned what made one model’s driving experience different from another. I was hooked on classic 911’s and if I had only listened to my gut I would be the proud owner of an ’88 3.2 Carrera for what would now be considered an obscenely low price, it’s too painful to say anything further on the subject.

As with many new fans of these classic cars, I quickly learned that the SC is widely regarded as the best candidate for a person’s first 911. It’s not dangerously fast, it’s relatively easy to work on provided you’re somewhat mechanically inclined and there is a wealth of information out there to help you learn its quirks. It was (and to some degree still is) the most affordable way to achieve classic 911 motoring bliss but as this advert shows, affordable is a relative term. The big pluses here are that this car has lived its entire life in California, its only traveled 80,000 miles in the last 14 years and the color combination is one of my favorites. The tan leather with brown leather dash and door accents fit perfectly inside the Light Blue Metallic (L30T) shell. Within the last year the owner has replaced the alternator, fuel pump and sunroof cables, which all areas of concern with these cars. He fitted the rather clean Fuchs wheels with decent Dunlop rubber about 6 months ago and replaced all the shocks with OEM ones about 3 years ago.…

1982 Bitter SC

The Bitter SC is, to me, a very interesting car. Born from the relatively pedestrian Opel Senator platform, the slinky 2-door coupe seemed to borrow a fair amount of its character from the much more exclusive Ferrari lineup outside. Underneath, though, the looks were not backed up by a sonorous V12, but rather the 3 liter inline-6 (later bumped to 3.9 liters) from the Opel lineup. This was mated to a GM-derived 3-speed automatic. Though the power output was respectable for the day at 180 horsepower, the heavy automatic Bitter was much more a cruiser than a backroad bandit. That was reinforced by the interior, which has a definite bias towards luxury instead of sport. This was not a sports car but instead a grand tourer, and the appointments inside were made to the highest standards of the day. The competition was not the Porsche 911, but rather cars like the Maserati Kyalami and the Ferrari 400i. The SC was an exclusive car, with only around 400 examples produced; but today, they’re a great value in the classic car market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Bitter SC on eBay

1985 Bitter SC 3.9

As an automotive blog, we receive our fair share of emails suggesting we feature specific cars. Often they’re popular versions of cars that everyone likes to see; M3s, S6s, M5s, 190E 2.3 16Vs – the usual suspects. But probably once every other week or so someone spots something legitimately rare to see; this past week, we were sent two such gems. One was a rare Mercedes-Benz L319 delivery van – it was in rough shape but all there, and they’re very cool to see, with perhaps only single digit numbers in the United States – thanks to our reader Kurt for sending that one through, it had us dreaming! The other was an equally rare sight these days, but this car represented the opposite end of the spectrum from the Mercedes. Clearly loved and well cared for by the seller, this 1985 Bitter SC features the later, 207 horsepower 3.9 inline-6 and is presented in pleasing Anthracite Grey:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Bitter SC 3.9 on eBay

Heap of the Week Twofer: 1985 Bitter SC and 1989 Alpina B10 3.5/1

While we usually don’t like to show cars that are not at least good examples of the respective marques that they represent, occasionally some oddballs pop up that are just too good to pass up. Today is such a case, with two unique vehicles popping up on Ebay that rarely get seen at all. Unfortunately, both are in need of a fair amount of work, so depending on your comfort level I wouldn’t really consider either of these cars a turn key, collector vehicle as they stand. However, with the right about know-how, determination and a fair amount of work I think both of these cars could be resurrected to their former glory; certainly, both would bring smiles at shows wherever they went. Let’s look first at the rare duck of the two, the Bitter SC:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Bitter SC on eBay

1985 Bitter SC

As John DeLorean found out with his ill-fated sports car that lasted for all of three model years, starting your own car company isn’t easy. Such was the case with Erich Bitter, a name which is rather obscure outside of the most hardcore auto enthusiast circles. A former race driver, Bitter took mundane Opel mechanicals and created low production sports and luxury models which were sold in both in Europe and the US. The company started out with the CD in 1973, which was originally an Opel design study. Later, in 1979, Bitter unveiled the SC, which was based on Opel Senator mechanicals. One quick look and you might mistake it for a Ferrari 400i. Under the skin it was anything but, with an Opel inline-6 under the hood and an interior lined in leather dotted with GM switchgear. Under 500 coupes were built over ten years, with 22 convertibles and just five sedans. A few made their way into the US via Buick dealers such as this SC for sale in New York.

Year: 1985
Model: SC
Engine: 3.9 liter inline-6
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
Mileage: 66,540 mi
Price: $13,400

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Bitter SC on eBay

1985 Bitter SC … 66,540 Original Miles

Engine: 6 Cyl, 3.0L
Transmission: 3 speed turbo hydramatic transmission
VIN: W09526219FSB09175
Exterior: Blue
Interior: Tan
Body Style: Coupe

This German Beauty comes to us equipped with automatic transmission, power brakes, leather / heated seats, fog lights, power windows, power door locks, Blaupunkt tape / AM / FM and air conditioning.

Engine is in good shape, does not smoke, does not leak, nice and quiet. Transmission feels Perfect, shifts without any problems, without delay, and without noise. Suspension is in excellent shape, Car tracks nice and straight. There is no evidence of any electrical problems.

Convertible Week: 1982 Porsche 911 SC Targa

Wait…WHAT??!??! A targa featured during convertible week…are we losing it? Nope, this car is way too nice to not feature and come on, let’s face it, the targa is the man’s convertible. You can get the wind in your hair and not look like you’re going through a mid-life crisis. It’s the best of both worlds.

The SC was introduced in 1978 and featured a 3.0-liter engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection that underwent several upgrades throughout the life of the SC. By the time this car was sold in 1982, the output had been increased from to 204bhp. Mated to a 5-speed gearbox, the 911 SC could put down some impressive numbers. Zero to 60 took 5.5 seconds and the quarter mile arrived in the low 14 second range.

With the perfect color combo and no turbo look clutter, this black on black 911 for sale in Carlstadt, New Jersey is a great low mileage car to add to any collection.

Year: 1982
Model: 911 SC Targa
Engine: 3.0 liter flat six
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 66,300 mi
Price: $22,850 Buy It Now

1982 Porsche 911 SC Targa on eBay

1982 Porsche 911 SC Targa. Black/black, 66k miles, clean Carfax, garage kept. Acquired directly from Porsche enthusiast. Visit http://www.projectoneauto.com to view more pictures or call 201-635-1400. Buyback guarantee.

This is a great low mileage SC that I personally am about to sell everything I own to pick up. With only 66,000 miles, this car has seen 2,200 miles a year throughout its charmed life. With values on the 911 SC rising consistently, this car is a good deal at $22,850 and could be a steal with a bit of bargaining.

-Brian…

1983 Porsche 911 Cabriolet

After a long hiatus, Porsche released the 911 Cabriolet in the fall of 1982 as a 1983 model. Not since the 356 Speedsters of the ’60s had Porsche gone topless. It proved very popular with 4,214 sold in its introductory year and since then, the 911 Cabriolet has been a favorite on the Porsche roster. Based on the numbers these cars aren’t particularly rare, however, they are always sought after.

Generally low mileage cars like this one are commanding upwards of $30K, with average retail on the 911SC Cab at $26K. This clean looking, low mileage car for sale in Binghamton, New York could be a steal for someone looking to get in to the 911 game.

Year: 1983
Model: 911 Cabriolet
Engine: 3.0L flat 6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,000 mi
Price: $15,500

1983 Porsche 911 Cabriolet on craigslist

driversside

This is a 1983 Porsche 911 convertible in very good shape, standard 5 speed, 36,000 original miles with current inspection, please call. Doug Hall- 607-722-0946

Well, Doug’s post here isn’t too full of information on the car with regards to history, condition, etc… but I’m sure a phone call will give you a sense if this car is for you or not. With an asking price of $15,500, and only 36K original miles, this car certainly warrants further investigation.

-Brian…