1998 BMW M3 Sedan

While the E30 320is was the defacto M3 Sedan of the first generation, it was not until the E36 generation that fans finally received a full-fat four-door small M. The sedan was then skipped on the E46 generation (I can hear ZHP fans shouting that their car is a real M right now), returned for the E90 generation, and then became the only body style thereafter as BMW introduced the new 4-Series nomenclature. Since its launch in the US for the ’97 model year, the M3 Sedan has been a niche model within a niche lineup on performance cars; practical and good-looking in a way that the long-door coupe sometimes lacks proper proportion in. Indeed, to me the most recent three generations of M3 Sedans look better than their two-door counterpart. While I’m not sure I feel the same way about the E36 generation, it’s nonetheless great to see one surface in a nice color with lower mileage, as many were loved well and driven hard. This Estoril Blue Metallic example I’m looking at today sure looks the part; but I’m not sure the juice is worth the squeeze:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 BMW M3 Sedan on eBay


Year: 1998
Model: M3 Sedan
VIN: WBSCD9322WEE08235
Engine: 3.2 liter inline-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 49,500 mi
Location: Daytona Beach, Florida
Price: $44,900 Buy It Now

Enclosed shipping included anywhere in the lower 48 US states with buy-it-now price.

Please reach out with any questions about the car, I’m happy to discuss.

Additional enthusiast inventory can be found on my website, www.coastalautoconnect.com

Pre-purchase inspections welcomed.

Videos of the car:

Walkaround:

Driving:

Engine running:

Undercarriage:

Coldstart:

Estoril Blue Metallic is a great color, full stop. It looks excellent on this sport example; the Luxury Pack equipment is always a ‘Womp Womp’ moment for me when I see an E36. Outside of the clear corner lights and black grilles, both of which are pretty easily reversible, this one looks pretty stock. Inside, the light gray leather looks about as good as you’ll find. There are minor modifications here, too – a European-specification steering wheel seeming to be the only change. Under the hood hides a Dinan strut bar and a pretty stainless-steel exhaust system. In all, it’s pretty ‘stock’ for an E36. Condition appears to be great, though no history is really discussed.

So let’s lay the cards on the table. It’s been in an accident, it’s claimed to have had seven owners, and the asking price is $45,000? There’s just nothing to support that price. A very similar car sold recently for less than half that amount, and while it’s not like they’re making more these are also not impossible cars to find. Cool to see, yes! But they’re not worth the same as an E90 or F80 M3.

-Carter

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2 Comments

  1. Glad I’m not alone in thinking almost $50k for a prior crashed E36 was absolutely insane. Good heavens. Again, what on earth is wrong with these sellers? How can you not know the value of what you are trying to sell? I just don’t get it.

  2. At this point seems like around $25k is the top end for super pristine low mileage examples. Not sure who is paying $40-50k for these. My guess is nobody. Pretty stoked I got mine for 8 a few years ago!

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