2001 BMW Z8

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Every time I come across a Z8, I start thinking about the funny place it holds in the market, slightly appreciating but not very appreciated, an interesting but maligned attempt at a German Cobra… and then I see it from the rear. While the F-Type’s reiteration may be making a play for the top derrieres list, the Z8 viewed from behind erases reason and makes me dream of using the monster S62 to slither a mountain road. This one looks classic in black and very serious with the hard top on. The Teutonic, measured approach to a passionate type of car makes them a bit of an odd duck, and a Z8 owners meeting would most likely host more of investors than enthusiasts. Alas, I dig these cars, but will never own one.

Click for details: 2001 BMW Z8 on eBay

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Year: 2001
Model: Z8
Engine: 4.9 liter V8
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 12,864 mi
Price: $169,900 Buy It Now

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Marino Performance is very excited to announce that we have just acquired what may be one of the rarest BMWs made! This 1-Owner 2001 BMW Z8 collectible that is literally beautiful in every way imaginable! This Z8 is being offered with all of its original bits including the factory hard top, soft top boot, 2 keys, and books! This Jet Black Z8 truly as new as they come with 12,834 pampered miles, the Crema and Black leather interior looks like it’s brand new, this car needs nothing but a new adoring owner! These cars have spiked in price over the last few years, so don’t miss out on this rare masterpiece! Thanks everyone for looking and best of luck to all!

Features
This BMW Z8 has many options including desirable features such as:
6-Speed Manual Transmission
M Driving Dynamics Control
5L DOHC 32-valve V8
Xenon Lights
Factory Hardtop
Remote Keyless Entry
Harmon Kardon Sound
6 disc CD Changer

As always we have set the price thousands below NADA and the Kelley Blue Book to give you the best deal!

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With most cars, we have to sift through the mediocre examples to find the great one-owner, well cared for, rarely-driven cherries. All the Z8s that turn up seem to be impeccable garage-queens. With that being the standard, I guess you’d have to assume that significantly using one in enthusiastic ways would put it significantly below the market mean and thus kill its value. What a shame.

-NR

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6 Comments

  1. Z8’s have always been odd ducks to me. The answer to a question no one asked…

    And a little too much retro, 50’s American diner styling for my tastes.

    Also:
    1. These appeared with no correlation to any racing program or BMW’s then line up. They just….appeared.

    2. The initial speculation occurred early and MASSIVELY. I recall these new just sitting on dealers’ lots with stupidly inflated prices….sitting…not selling…looking weird…

  2. I’m a relative newcomer to the site, so I don’t know if any of what I am about to write has been discussed here before. Anyhow, I have been a long time BMW owner and enthusiast (both cars and motorcycles).

    IMHO, there are a lot of both pros and cons to the Z8.

    On the surface, there is a lot to like.

    I find the overall design to be quite nice, especially considering that it comes from the Bangle era. Yes, there are certain details that don’t look right to me (the plastic dash, for example, is terrible). Nevertheless, I think it does a reasonable job of paying tribute to the original 507 without being too retro.

    When the Z8 was introduced, BMW promised customers a 50 year supply of spare parts and support which many thought would almost guarantee its status as a future classic and collectible.

    A wonderful V8 mated to a manual transmission (except for the Alpina version) in a roadster from BMW would seem, at first, to lay the foundation for a fantastic vehicle.

    However, as one digs a little deeper there are some areas of concern that any potential (and current) owner should be aware of.

    AFAIK, all the Z8’s left the factory with an open rear differential. Might not make much of a difference to some, but it’s a real shame, IMO. I believe there were some aftermarket LSD’s manufactured, but I don’t know if there are any still available.

    Most troubling, though, are some apparent areas of weaknesses in the aluminum chassis. Deformation and/or bending of the shock towers and/or subframe assemblies are sadly a little too common to be simply dismissed as merely isolated and/or accident related incidents.

    I am by no means an expert on this or any other vehicle for that matter. Nevertheless, I strongly encourage anyone in the market for a Z8 to do their due diligence before making a purchase.

    There are steps one can take to avoid problems (for example, BMW offers a Performance Package which should help), but once damage has occurred it is very difficult and expensive to correct.

  3. @VTBoss302 – welcome to the site and wonderful first post! The Z8 is a vehicle that makes my head spin – in both good and bad ways, you certainly touched on a few of them. I’ve honestly been thinking of how to make a few articulate points myself about the legacy of the Z8 (and am still working on brainstorming!). But you got it off to a great start. And FWIW I believe you’re right about the lack of LSD, AFAIK it’s unavailable outside M cars for 20-ish+ years. More soon…

    PS – spoiler alert, I think the neutered (lower HP) all automatic Alpinas were the worst possible note this car could have gone off on.

    Counterpoint – I think the Z8 hardtop is probably the sexiest factory hard top of all time!

  4. @Ry

    Thanks for the welcome and the kind words.

    It was not my intention to “bash” BMW, the Z8 or the seller of this vehicle and I hope I didn’t come across that way.

    All cars have their strengths and weaknesses. I’ll leave it at that 😉

  5. @Ry – in true Alpina form, the lower horsepower, only automatic Z8s turned out to be quicker around a track than the manuals. Makes you wonder what BMW was doing wrong!

  6. @Carter – I will have to go dig up side by side reviews, off hand I remember the Alpina handling being criticized in part due to its larger wheels (??).

    Interestingly, and not surprisingly, Hagerty reveals the ’03 Alpinas being valued at a discount today to all other models. I knew when they were taking the last batch and doing that particular “Alpina makeover” that something was up…maybe they made too many or didn’t make the base model hard edged enough, I’m not sure. But to have the least collectible be the last few hundred you made speaks volumes.

    That said – I’ve seen these in the wild 3-5 times, in motion only once, and dang it was awesome.

    Its legacy reminds me a bit of the 8-series coupes, with less crazy (for the time) tech. Cool cars but the potential ownership demographic is a bit narrow based on the car’s looks, price, & performance.

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