1980 Audi 5000 Diesel

If this morning’s Jetta TDi was a bit too new for you and you’d really like an alternative to the run-of-the-mill older Mercedes-Benz diesel crowd, we may just have the answer for you in today’s 1980 5000 Diesel. Audi was still quite a fledgling in the United States in 1980 and the reputation of the early 100s – while comfortable cruisers – didn’t really help the company much. In the days before Quattro then there were few Audis to be found on these shores, but they’re smart looking cars, and in the case of the second generation 100/200/5000, quite well built. Still, it’s very rare to see them out and about today, and even more rare in the condition of today’s diesel:

Year: 1980
Model: 5000 Diesel
Engine: 2.0 liter inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 118,609 mi
Price: $9,995 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Audi 5000 Diesel on eBay

Diesel lover special, 1980 Audi 5000 Diesel !!!!!!!!!!

Belonged to German couple in Oregon, New belts, New Brembo brakes, fluids, filters……………………………look at the pictures, unbelievable condition. ZERO rust. Once in a life time. Starts, Runs, Drive EXCELLENT.
5 Cylinder naturally aspirated diesel, 5 speed manual transmission, interior like brand new. amazing car.
Can come with 20 Day Temporary tag (except for Massachusetts residents), and New Hampshire state inspected if needed!

Title is clean and on hand.

Don’t be afraid to pick up the phone if you have any questions.

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It’s close to unbelievable that this car still exists in this condition in New England, but here it is. The paint seems a bit faded on the hood and the wheels aren’t the original silver color, but overall this car shows very well. The interior in particular looks amazingly clean and late 70s-chiq. I’m also pretty amazed by the condition of the engine bay, something that’s not generally known to be so clean on diesels. Were I to snap this up, about the only changes I’d undertake would be perhaps to make it a bit more “Euro” with some 200 5T pieces like bumpers, headlights, and perhaps a 5-bolt conversion to run some R8s. Otherwise I really think this car is just about perfect. The price may seem high for an older 5000, but as we often say you couldn’t buy a bad one and make it this nice for this amount of money. If you really want to stand a bit out from the crowd, here’s your ride!

-Carter

1991 Audi 100

When talking to automotive enthusiasts about the car you own, most would lose interest when the answer to “Is it a quattro?” is “No”. But as a non-quattro Audi owner, let me be the first to say that circumstance just isn’t the end of the world. Indeed, because of their quattro-baised layouts, the front wheel drive Audi platforms from the 1980s are some of the best handling FWD cars made and are quite enjoyable to drive. This extends not only to the mid-sized 4000 and Coupe GTs, but also the 5000 and later 100/200 variants. Though heavy for their power output compared to the large BMW and Mercedes-Benz competition, the front driver 5000/100 is a well composed cruiser that’s quite dependable and even gets reasonable fuel mileage due to the great aerodynamics. 1991 was the last year of the Type 44 100/200 platform, and though they’re rare to see in good shape a nice 1991 example has popped up on Ebay:

Year: 1991
Model: 100
Engine: 2.3 liter inline-5
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
Mileage: 95,000 mi
Price: $1,600 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi 100 on eBay

********JUST INSPECTED************
Badge good until end of November 2014
Clean Car. 95 K miles
STOCK!!!
Front Wheel Drive
Moonroof
Heated Seats
Good Tires
West Coast Car No Rust
Radio does not work

Buyer Responsible for taxes, license plate, registration, transportation,
All sales are final
Anybody can stop by and drive it before they bid…..I have no problem giving test drives before end of auction
Winning bidder owns the Car
I am selling the car locally so I can end the Auction at any time
If you want it click on Buy IT NOW.or shoot me an email for an offer

Sure, the automatic isn’t to everyone’s taste, but having owned one of the Audi 3-speed autos it’s not a bad ride – and let’s not forget it isn’t a 20V Turbo. This is one of the top-spec 100s from 1991, with leather and heated seats. The 2.3 liter inline-5 is smooth and has reasonable torque. If you’re looking for a little style, dependability and a reasonably fun driver, this might just be the ticket – the price is sure spot on for a great condition winter beater!

-Carter

Afternoon Accessories: Audi 5000/100 Euro Headlights

Ever drive a mid-80s Audi at night? I have, many times. It’s downright frightening with the U.S.spec lights. With barely enough candlepower to light up the entire lens, I’m not sure how the DOT thought those lights were “safer” but I find driving at night much safer when I can see. Drive an older 5000 or 4000 in a light rain at night and you’ll know what I mean; it’s definitely a case of guessing where the lanes are. A popular upgrade on both models is to swap in European market headlights, such as these today on Ebay:

Year: 1984-1991
Model: 5000/100
Condition: Used
Price: $175 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Audi 5000/100 Euro Headlights on eBay

You are looking at a Rare Hella Audi Driver and Passenger side Euro headlights e-code, this lights came out from 1990 Audi 100/5000. They will fit all 100/5000 from 1982 to 1991, they’re used but in good working condition (see pics.). there are no broken pieces all mouting tabs are intact. 4 light bulbs and rear caps are included. If you have any question regarding this item please e-mail or call 916-548-4823.

Please check all 10 detailed pictures above!!!

While the single H4 Hellas aren’t as sexy looking as the H1/H4 twin units, they do provide a substantial upgrade in headlight power. Just make sure to wire them properly with relays, as otherwise you’ll find yourself melting your headlight switch in a hurry. At $175, these sure seem like a great deal!

-Carter

1989 Audi 100 Quattro 2.4 Turbo Diesel

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If this doesn’t spark your interest in a diesel, not much will! The Audi 100 Quattro is not a car that we often feature at GCFSB. Both generations of 100 quattro – C3 and C4 – fall squarely in the shadow of their more powerful big brothers. In the case of the C4, the S4 quattro stole all of the limelight from the relatively unremembered 2.8 V6 powered 100 quattro (which would be renamed the A6 quattro in 1995), while the C3 100 quattro was around for only a very short time – like the turbocharged 200 and 200 20V quattros. While not many opted for the less powerful 2.3 10V motor, they’re known as solid workhorses of cars, with many still hitting their stride with 250,000 plus miles. Like old Benzs, these cars were strong, dependable and well built – if admittedly quite slow. Today’s example has resolved some of the “slow” issue in a unique way; this particular quattro has received a 2.4 inline 5 turbo diesel transplant:

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Year: 1989
Model: 100 Quattro
Engine: 2.4 liter turbocharged inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 98,296 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Audi 100 Quattro Turbo Diesel on eBay

Purchase of new house necessitates sale:

1989 Audi 100 Quattro converted to turbo diesel.

98,296 miles on chassis, 18,936 miles on engine. (Engine swap done at 79,360 miles on chassis.)

Link to build thread on VWDiesel.net: http://www.vwdiesel.net/forum/index.php?topic=25252.0

Link to build thread on MotorGeek: http://www.motorgeek.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=45746

YouTube video: http://youtu.be/XVP1p0f2Oik

Link to vehicle specifications on AudiWorld: http://www.AudiWorld.com -> Tools -> Model Guide -> 100 -> 1989 Audi 100

Fuel economy – I drive mostly around town, and always get better than 30 MPG. On a road trip staying between 55 and 65, it gets about 35 MPG.

As far as power, it does surprisingly well. It’s much quicker than it was in gas form. There’s always more power to be had. I would suggest a free-flow exhaust system for starters. Next would be a bigger turbo.

2.4 liter (2370cc) diesel engine from Canadian Eurovan application. 79.5 mm bore, 95.5 mm stroke, 22.5:1 compression ratio. This engine also features oil squirters under the pistons.

This is an indirect injected diesel (IDI) engine, not a direct injected (TDI) engine. In general, it revs higher, and is a little quieter than a TDI engine.

It uses 100% mechanical fuel injection, and is extremely reliable. Apart from the starter and the glow plugs, it only requires 1 wire to run, and that’s for the fuel cutoff solenoid to the fuel injection pump.

It is licensed and titled as a “Diesel”, and thus shouldn’t be any problems getting it registered in your state. In the state/county where I live, diesels don’t require emissions inspections.

I run Mobil 1 Turbo Diesel oil, and have changed the oil and filter every 5000 miles.

It is always properly warmed up. It starts in the cold well, especially when the block heater is plugged in.

The gear ratios aren’t ideal, but I have run it up to 80 MPH no problem. I mostly run it at 55 MPH or less.

It runs about 12 PSI of boost just casually rowing through the gears. It will peak at about 15 PSI when floored. When cruising down the road at a steady 55 MPH, it runs about 4 PSI.

It smokes very little. Basically the only time you can see it, is if you floor it while the engine is bogged down. There’s a good example of it in the YouTube video.

New spare parts – Brake fluid reservoir, clutch master cylinder, clutch slave cylinder, Zimmerman cross-drilled rotors for front brakes (2 sets), Hawk pads (front), stainless steel brake lines (front), brake caliper rebuild kits (front and rear) 034 Motorsport short shift kit, VDO pyrometer and wiring kit, tail light (Hella), oil drain plugs and gaskets, rear trunk lid “turbo” and “D” chrome badges from Europe.

I will also include a set of Bentley workshop manuals.

The Engine:

When VW/Audi remanufactures an engine, they recondition the good useable parts, and replace the rest with new. This particular engine has a brand new block among other things. The head was remanufactured to new specifications and new swirl chambers were installed.

The number of new parts on this car is staggering. Just a quick, yet incomplete rundown:

Pistons – Genuine

Oil pump – Genuine

Starter motor – Genuine

Camshaft – Genuine

Lifters (Hydraulic) – Genuine

Valves – Genuine

Front crankshaft sprocket – Genuine

Camshaft front sprocket – Genuine

Tensioner pulley – Genuine

Upper and lower timing belt covers – Genuine

Valve cover (imported from European Audi 100 TD application) – Genuine

Multi-layered steel head gasket (from European Audi 100 TD application) – Genuine

ARP 2000 head studs, ARP 2000 connecting rod bolts, ARP main bolts

Dual mass flywheel and clutch from early S4 application – Luk – (Absolutely no gear chatter)

Pilot and release bearings – Genuine

Intercooler – Genuine

Upper and lower intercooler hoses – Genuine

Coolant reservoir – Genuine

All coolant hoses, including heater core hoses – Genuine

All belts – Genuine

Water pump – Genuine

Aluminum lower thermostat coolant flange – Genuine

Aluminum upper head coolant flange – Genuine

Rear head coolant flange – Genuine

Thermostat – OEM

Fuel injectors – 155 bar – Bosch

Fuel injection lines – Genuine

Turbo oil lines – Custom made by 034 Motorsport

Valve cover oil separator/breather – Genuine

Glow plugs – Bosch

Glow plug relay – Genuine

Block heater – Autobahn (Genuine)

All engine gaskets, seals, fasteners, and hose clamps – Genuine

Again, these are just some of the new parts. All of the other parts were refurbished to “as new” condition:

The already very low mile fuel injection pump was rebuilt to “Super Pump” specifications by Performance Injection in Canada (a.k.a. “Giles”). It is supposed to be able to supply enough fuel and proper timing for 250 HP, in case you decide to turn the wick up that high.

Turbo professionally rebuilt

Intake manifold – glass beaded, port matched and painted

Exhaust manifold – cleaned, no cracks

Aluminum oil pan from Audi 20 valve 3B/7A application

Pyrometer thermocouple already installed in the turbo, just needs to be connected to the gauge.

Body stuff:

Headlights – Hella

Floor mats – Genuine

Hood struts – Genuine

Shift knob – Genuine

All of the proper engine-specific tools were used in the assembly of this engine, including a freshly calibrated torque wrench.

I installed a different transmission with slightly better gear ratios. Before doing so, I replaced all of the external seals. I also replaced the transmission mounts with new.

I purchased the wheels and tires new from the Tire Rack a few years ago. The wheels are 17″ ASA in excellent condition with the exception of a little bit of pitting from the elements on the machined lip. They have never been “curbed”. The tires are Dunlop Direzza Sport Z1 215/45-17, and are in ok condition, except for the fronts which wouldn’t pass Utah safety inspection because of excessive wear on the insides. (Everything else passed the safety inspection just fine though.)

Electric vacuum pump runs the HVAC controls and rear differential lock.

Alpine head unit with full iPod control – Actually shows the album cover and such on the display. It does not play CDs.

Infinity front dash speakers

Due to its thermostatically controlled oil cooler, the engine stays cool, even in hot weather. Yet, it produces plenty of heat in the winter.

The paint and body is in very good condition with the exception of a couple of small dings, and what appears to be some oxidation on the hood, roof and trunk lid. I’m sure a good buffing would take care of it.

It’s in good condition, but it has some small issues:

The headliner in the rear is starting to sag. This is a very common occurrence on these cars. It just started a couple of months ago.

Slight battery drain – Can be left over the weekend just fine, but after more than about 4 days, the battery will be too weak to start the engine.

The tensioning rod for the alternator belt is cracked – This causes the alternator to squeal a little under load. It could easily be welded or replaced

There is a small leak around the intercooler to manifold coupling that is causing oil to weep out and land on the inside passenger-side fender and firewall.

It needs a new shift boot – These are no longer available from Audi, but I have the leather, special thread, special leather sewing machine needle, and the old one to use for parts and as a template to make a new one.

The air conditioning works, but needs a recharge. The air coming out of the vents is only slightly cooler than the ambient air. For now the belt has been removed to conserve energy.

The transmission doesn’t shift as smoothly into 2nd gear as it should. I think it’s because of the Motul transmission oil I put in there. I think original Audi transmission oil should be put back in.

The engine oil pressure indicator stays on. I think it’s either because I have it wired wrong, or the wrong sender in installed. The actual oil pressure gauge works fine, and the engine always has plenty of oil pressure.

The front passenger-side power window doesn’t reliably roll up. It eventually does, but only after clicking the switch a bunch of times.

I think the front left wheel bearing is groaning a little bit. I can’t tell for sure, but it seems like there is a little bit of noise coming from that area when slowing down to stop.

The tachometer doesn’t work. This could probably be adapted to work by running the output from an alternator with a “W” terminal up to the instrument cluster. Behind the cluster is a switch for “Petrol or Diesel”, which I assume has something to do with where the tachometer gets its input from.

Slight power steering pump leak. I think it’s leaking near the bottom of the pump, and then down onto the block. The power steering rack itself is fine, no leaks.

Small oil leak near the front of the engine somewhere. It’s very slow, and has never noticeably affected the oil levels in the engine. It could be coming from the lower turbo oil line since I have seen a drip or two there before.

The exhaust system needs a flexible coupler between the downpipe and the rest of the system. Romping on the throttle can cause this joint to come apart.

Cruise control is not operational.

All of these things have been on my “To Do” list, but I no longer have the time to work on it.

Everything else works great (e.g. ABS, rear differential lock, CV joints, sunroof, defroster, lights, etc.)

Don’t buy this because you’re looking for a cheap diesel car to drive, or because you want to run Veggie oil in it. Buy it because you’re looking for a reliable, simple, safe, and iconic 80’s vintage Audi Quattro.

Cool, cool, cool. Sure, not the most stylish Audi out there, but this one is sure unique. Yeah, you’ll fly under the radar, but you’ll do so for a long time as this is one of the lowest mile Audi 100 quattros I’ve seen for sale in a long time, and the addition of the turbo diesel insures longevity to be measured in decades, not years. If there is one thing not to like, it’s the wheels; I’d prefer to opt for something smaller and a touch more appropriate, such as these period-correct and super rare Rials:

Of course, these cars originally came with 15×6 BBSs that can still be sourced, so there’s that option as well. The relative simplicity of this car is what makes it appealing; I love that it’s cloth interior rather than leather. It will be really interesting to see where this one ends up; value is tough to peg. Normally a 100 Quattro would have a tough time even fetching a few thousand dollars, but this is simply the best one I remember seeing and the uniqueness of the turbo diesel unit kicks it up another notch. Will it outperform (in price, at least) its 200 20V brethren? If there’s a 100 Quattro that could do it, this just may be it.

-Carter

Heap of the Week: 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S

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If last week’s “Heap of the Week” Karmann Ghia T34 was a great restoration candidate because of it’s rarity, today’s 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S is as much deserving of that if not more. Luckily for you, if you’re interested in one of these cars and a restoration project, step one (take apart and turn it into an unrecognizable heap of parts) is already done for you! Completely stripped and ready for body work, this car appears to be a solid platform for a build – something that’s hard to say of any earlier Audi due to rust issues. You’d also be building what is decidedly the most rare post-war Audi in the United States, with only 5 known of here. Get out your elbow grease then for today’s Heap of the Week:

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Year: 1973
Model: 100 Coupe S
Engine: 1.9 liter inline-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $2,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S on Audifans.com

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1973 Audi 100 Coupe S. 1 of 5 in the US. Was brought to the US in about 1976 and has not been on the road since the early to mid 80s. The car is 98% complete. What is missing that I know of are the windshield, headliner, carpet and engine mounts. The body is remarkably solid with only a minimal amount of surface rust due to the car sitting in primer for at least the past 5 years. The unibody and all bolt on parts are very solid and there are no rust holes on the vehicle. Will need some more body work before painting. I believe the original color is marathon blue. This car also has a manual (crank operated) retractable sunroof which was apparently a rather rare option. Engine is 100 HP I4 carbbed pushrod engine. All engine parts are included as well as new gasket sets. Transmission is 4 speed. Brakes are inboard on front (new rotors and pads included) and drums in rear. Seats are in quite decent shape without any major tears or rips in the fabric. Seat color is dark blue. All interior pieces and exterior trim is included as well. Dashboard has cracks in it as does the vinyl hood around the instrument cluster. All the windows except for the windshield are in great shape and already wrapped very securely in bubble wrap. Grille, headlights and taillights are there. Bumpers are US spec sedan bumpers and not the original European coupe bumpers. Extra hood in perfect shape included. Front suspension is dual wishbone and rear is beam axle with torsion springs and panhard bar. 2 new shocks are included. Car would be a good candidate for restoration to original condition, or a rather unique platform for some fun go-fast modifications. Comes with clean Maryland title. Reason for selling is that I bought it four years ago and have not done anything with it since, and I think it should go to someone who has the time to do something cool with such a unique car. To see the true potential of the car, check out the April 2013 issue of Hemmings Sport & Exotic car where a 1974 Coupe S was featured. Area code on phone number is 410.

These are rare, rare, rare cars, even in the Fatherland. There just aren’t too many left kicking around in good shape. Certainly , when they are presented well, they draw a crowd. The design shows links to some of the best looking cars of the 1960s and 1970s, like the BMW Glas GT , Fiat Dino and even Maserati Ghibli. Below is an example of what this car can look like, as this is Rob Petschke’s impeccable award-winning example:

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I also put an image to a similar colored car to this car’s original shade in the gallery. Most of the major parts are included (though not shown), and despite what you might think, some of the parts for these cars can still be had, though you better brush up on your German. Some major components are also shared with the sedan, and when you were done you’d have a much more valuable platform, so you might even consider finding a not-restorable 100 and pilfering parts. Ready for a project? You’re getting in on the bottom floor of one of the most rare Audis ever!

-Carter

1972 Audi 100 LS

The third generation Audi 100 (5000 to the U.S.) was so revolutionary as a mid-sized sedan, it’s easy to forget that there were two generations of Audi 100s that preceded it. Long before the legendary Quattro debuted, Audi was actually selling a reasonable amount of 100LSs and Foxes here in the 1970s. Not the sportiest or most luxurious of the mid range sedans, the 100 wasn’t the best competition for BMW and Mercedes-Benz, but in its day it was a respectable car. Unfortunately, its day didn’t last very long; plagued with reliability, rust and electrical issues, many of these 100s left a sour taste in U.S. buyers mouths. Now 40 years later, finding a clean 100 is a tough job, but once in a while one pops up for sale, such as today’s black 1972 100LS::

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Year: 1972
Model: 100LS
Engine: 1.9 liter inline-4
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
Mileage: 66,000 mi
Price: $11,111.11 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Audi 100LS on eBay

I purchased this several years ago from the original “old lady” owner / driver in Maryland. It was all black with original paint. It was just professionally repainted with a cream colored roof.

Has the original tan vinyl interior, with a little over 60,000 miles on the odometer. In very good condition, drives well. Minimal rust. Never been in an accident. I still drive occasionally, it gets 27mpg. Front brakes have been totally redone, booster bypassed for now. Excellent tires and new front shocks (Boge). The AC/air conditioner has been converted to a newer, more efficient type of compressor, replacing the old York, which vibrated too much and was quite a drag. The pulleys have all been machined to use current 38 degree V belts which was a real boner problem, because Audi spec’ed the original belt at something like 60 degrees and then stopped selling them! System not charged at the moment.

Radio is installed but not hooked up. This car has a good dash pad. Headliner has hole above right visor, not visible when visor in the parked position. I have many spare used and NOS parts. Car is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Gold/Silver accepted for payment. This is one of the best riding cars I have ever driven!

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I feel like it’s a common thread in my posts, but indeed this isn’t a car for everyone. Finding parts is pretty tough though they are available. Most of our fan base would pass this car off as too soft or not sporty enough compared to similar Benz or BMW models. Few want an older automatic. And, as is the case with this car being from Maryland originally, there is more rust in this car than appears on the surface. All of that said, it makes a very reasonable alternative to some of the normal iron that you see at shows. I have a friend with one of these in better shape, and it always seems to draw a crowd at shows. Sure, most people have bad stories to tell about some past relation that owned one and it broke, but what cars from the 1970s didn’t break time to time? I think this car’s design has continued to age well and still looks sharp, especially in black.

After talking with my 100 expert friend, we both agreed that this car is heavily overpriced. The very best 100LSs are not currently bringing the asking price of this car, and while this car is very nice, it’s not the best example out there. The rust would have to be addressed long term if you wanted to keep this, and doing so will be pricey for sure. Given the condition of the car, we both agreed that $5,000 – $6,000 was the right asking price for this car. The owner is certainly ambitious asking double that amount, but honestly is unlikely to get it. Despite that I hope this car finds a new loving owner who will continue to keep it up; finding clean 100LSs is going to continue to be a very rare event!

-Carter

2-Owner, Low-Mile 1974 Audi 100LS for sale

We come to this site, be it to read, write, or just ogle, because we share an affinity for something different.  That something different is German autos, unique in their attention to detail, unrivaled engineering, and strong (if restrained) styling themes.  Today we’ve got an important piece of German-car history that embodies these identifying elements, albeit one that I was heretofore unaware of.  Volkswagen bought Auto Union from Mercedes in 1965 with a main motivation being expanding production capacity for the Beetle.  Audi’s weak lineup led VW to place a moratorium on new model development, a command that was quickly disregarded by a top engineer.  He developed the Audi 100 on his own with VW only seeing it as a completed prototype.  It was good enough that they approved and released the 100 to significant commercial success.

This Audi 100LS has only had two owners over its 36 years and has covered just 50k miles.  It is thankfully not a garage queen, more a well-respected classic that’s not afraid to be used.  The look seems familiar at first but unique upon closer inspection, at first referencing recent Mercedes roots with the greenhouse and chrome trim followed by hints of Fiat in the tapered ends.  Engineering, design, and just the off-the-beaten-path nature differentiates it from more popular cars of the era and separates our tastes from the “standard” car guy or girl.

A testament:

This is a car that can be purchased and then driven with no issues. We drove it 5 hours to Waterfest some years ago, with no problems whatsoever and I would not hesitate to drive longer distances than that. Being an old car, there will always be things to tinker with if the owner chooses, but this is a turnkey, drive away toy- ready for cruising this summer. The mileage is accurate and I drove about a thousand miles each year.

The listing is worth reading if you’re interested in the car as it gives the impression that this has been a well-loved, well taken care of example of the first Audi under VW ownership.  It’s clean enough to show off yet not so perfect that it should be tucked away (no car should be, really), and sound enough to drive whenever you like.  The buy-it-now of $6,500 seems perfectly reasonable for someone out there like us who appreciates that which only German cars can provide.

-NR