1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant

Though it was instantly recognizable as an Audi, the all-new-for-’92 C4 bore little resemblance to the boxy C3 it replaced. Fluid lines and curves dominated the design, while new running gear and motors made a splash in performance. The C4 continued to stress Audi’s pioneering aerodynamic tradition, but the result this time was a car which seemed far less top-heavy than the chassis it replaced. It looked more trim even if it was a bit bigger than the outgoing model.

On the fly, the 100’s new motivation was a revelation. The 2.8 liter V6 replaced the 2.3 liter inline-5, and though horsepower was only 172 and torque 184, both figures represented a nearly 30% gain over the 5-pot. New, too, was a 4-speed automatic transmission. And while the inside looked little different from the last of the C3, only switchgear was shared and the C4 brought a host of new safety and convenience features to the large-chassis Audi.

Strange, though, was the re-appearance of Audi’s earlier naming convention in the US. Back in the early days of the 5000, Audi had used the “S” and “CS” monikers to denote turbo and quattro models at times (but, again being Audi, inconsistently). Well, the S and CS were back after a four-year hiatus. Base model 100 came with steel wheels, while the “S” model stepped you up in options and gave you alloys. But outside of the 20V turbo S4 model, the 100 to get was still the 100CS, which was the most loaded and gave you the option for Audi’s quattro drivetrain. Fully loaded, they were around $35,000 – not cheap, but also not the most expensive in class, and were still pretty unique in offering all-wheel drive. But like the C3, the front-drive 100/100S/100CS outsold the quattro model by a fair margin and are more common to find still kicking today. Audi claims they traded just 2,230 of the new 100CS quattro in 1992, only portion of which were wagons, so let’s take a peek at this Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant on eBay

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1992 Mercedes-Benz 500SL

This R129 sold for $13,000 on 3/6/22. Looks like it was a decent deal!

We made it to March and for some areas of the country, sSpring is in the air. For those who don’t have winter, congratulations: I envy you. That means that our cars are beginning to see the light of day and we are heading into buying and selling season as we prepare for driving again, and for some, that might be looking for a convertible. The easiest and one of the most cost-effective ways is to grab a Mercedes-Benz SL-Class as you basically have your pick from every budget level. In terms of bang for buck, the R129 is the way up there, and today’s car is something you don’t see everyday.

This Euro-spec 1992 500SL up for sale in San Diego has a little different look if you might have noticed. That is because it is wearing the handsome AMG body kit as well as some cool white AMG gauges. Don’t get too excited, as there isn’t a punched-out 6.0-liter under the hood, but rather the standard 5.0-liter M119 V8 we all know and love. Still, this one might be worth it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500SL on eBay

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1992 Porsche 944 S2 Coupe

In terms of pure value for money with the Porsche brand, the 944 S2 is way up there if you are hunting for a car that doesn’t cost $60,000. A half-decent coupe can still be acquired for $15,000, and the cabriolets are even a little cheaper. Even though these cars are going on 30 years old, they certainly aren’t slow. A healthy example can still put down a 0-60 time in 6.2 seconds, and even more surprisingly the can muster up a top speed of 150 mph. Yes, the maintenance can be pricey, especially when it comes to the timing belt service, but you wanted a Porsche, right?

Today, we are looking at a 1992 944 S2 coupe up for sale in Norwich, England, although I’m scratching my head at the model year. My understanding is that the production was done for all 944 models in 1991, so it’s likely this dealer is going by the registration date rather than the production date. Whatever the case, it is finished in the very rare color of Maritime Blue and has a matching shade of blue on the inside as well. What’s not to like?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 944 S2 Coupe at Dbure Valley Classics

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1992 Mercedes-Benz 500SEL

This W140 sold for $13,600 on November 17, 2021.

I still think the W140 Mercedes-Benz S-Class is occupying that no man’s land area where it isn’t old enough to be a full on classic, but certainly not new enough where original owner’s still are using them. When you look up 1990s styling, this is very much it, and maybe this isn’t a good thing. On the other hand, if you wanted to daily drive one, you certainly could as long as your wiring harness hasn’t turned to dust on the pre-facelift models. We are seeing the really nice Grand Edition and V12 cars sell for serious money, but the rest of the model line up seems to lag behind significantly.

Today’s example, a 1992 500SEL up for sale in Chicago looks like your typical early build, but shows an impressively low 25,000 miles. Even better? It’s Malachite Green Metallic.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500SEL on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

To me, the Porsche 964 was that perfect blend between the old school Porsche feel but modern enough amenities where you could drive it everyday and not feel like you were giving up everything. By the time the 964 rolled around in the early 1990s, you had basically all your power accessories, a half-decent air conditioning system, and an airbag steering wheel for when you bounce the car off a tree. On the other end, you still had the classic flat-six that has been around for ages by now, though it was bumped up to 3.6 liters, and the looks are still unmistakable as a Porsche. Because of this, among other reasons, 964s values have shot way up in the past 10 years or so. Long gone is finding a half decent Carrera 2 for $33,000, as those are suddenly $60,000. Rare color and low miles? Tack another $20,000 on to the price. This 1992 up for sale in Miami is no exception.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

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1992 Porsche 968 Coupe

The 968 occupies a strange space in the Porsche world. Limited in production, good looking, well-built and with good chassis dynamics and performance, it should have all of the hallmarks of a collector car in today’s market. Many prominent automobile publications have bashed you over the head with that, too – it’s not just me banging on here. Petrolicious posts an article (the same one, usually…) seemingly every week about the Porsche 968 Club Sport, Hemmings has repeatedly said it’s the best of the breed, and Hagerty told you to get on board in 2018 and buy one. And when Bring a Trailer sold one in late 2017 at $36,250, it seemed 2018 was poised to be the year of exploding values on the 968.

But it wasn’t. Bring a Trailer has, so far to date, failed to present a match to that one-off. It’s not for lack of trying – quite a few have come up since, including a Club Sport, but they’re all below $30,000. For reference, they’re selling at about the same price as E30 325is – and I’d argue that they’re a lot nicer. So here we are in 2021, wondering exactly where the values on these cars will head. Today’s clean Guards Red coupe is priced right below that 2017 sale from BaT – so is it a deal?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 968 Coupe on eBay

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1992 Audi 100CS quattro

So on to the C4 chassis. Though it was instantly recognizable as an Audi, the all-new C4 bore little resemblance to the boxy C3 it replaced. Fluid lines and curves dominated the design, while new running gear and motors made a splash in performance. The C4 continued to stress Audi’s pioneering aerodynamic tradition, but the result this time was a car which seemed far less top-heavy than the chassis it replaced. It looked more trim even if it was a big bigger than the outgoing model.

On the fly, the 100’s new motivation was a revelation. The 2.8 liter V6 replaced the 2.3 liter inline-5, and though horsepower was only 172 and torque 184, both figures represented a nearly 30% gain over the 5-pot. New, too, was a 4-speed automatic transmission. And while the inside looked little different from the last of the C3, only switch gear was shared and the C4 brought a host of new safety and convenience features to the large-chassis Audi.

Strange, though, was the re-appearance of Audi’s earlier naming convention in the US. Back in the early days of the 5000, Audi had used the “S” and “CS” monikers to denote turbo and quattro models at times (but, again being Audi, inconsistently). Well, the S and CS were back after a four-year hiatus. Base model 100 came with steel wheels, while the “S” model stepped you up in options and gave you alloys. But outside of the 20V turbo S4 model, the 100 to get was still the 100CS, which was the most loaded and gave you the option for Audi’s quattro drivetrain. Fully loaded, they were around $35,000 – not cheap, but also not the most expensive in class, and were still pretty unique in offering all-wheel drive.

However, like the C3, the front-drive 100/100S/100CS outsold the quattro model by a fair margin. Audi claims they traded 2,230 of the new 100CS quattro in 1992, and here’s one of the nicest ones out there:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 100CS quattro on eBay

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Swede Week: 1992 SAAB 900S Hatchback

If the Volvo V70 from yesterday moved the company into a new performance level and group of buyers with a modern performance platform, this SAAB 900 represents the last throes of Swedish independence. The 900 was introduced in 1978 and production ran all the way until 1994 and it was replaced by the Vetra-based 900NG, but the reality is that it was a development of the earlier 99 that was introduced in 1968. Yet somehow the 900 still looked as futuristic and different in 1992 as it did in 1982, or even 1972 for that matter. And though the chassis was rather dated by the Grunge-era, you wouldn’t know it stepping into one. These were solidly-built, well-engineered cars that dared to think differently, yet worked well. SAAB did an excellent job incorporating (and going above and beyond) safety regulations of the day, and the 900s integrated these features arguably much better than most despite their rather small production numbers. And, they were steadily upgraded over their production to breathe new life into the aging DNA.

Such is the case here, with this later 900S Hatchback. The ‘S’ introduced the 16V head on the backwards-mounted B201 2.0-liter inline-four to create the B202. Power jumped from a modest 116 horsepower to a slightly-less modest 128 horsepower. But in 1991, SAAB upped the ante again with a new 2.1-liter version called the B212. With another 10 horsepower, performance was at least on par with most of its contemporaries, and the 900’s low center of gravity belied its looks; these were good handling cars and offered great all-weather performance despite their front-drive only platform.

Of course, it was inside where the 900 really shined, offering copious interior space with a massive amount of storage available in the rear. I had a friend with one of these at the same time that I owned a Mk.II Golf, and the fit, finish, ride quality, and cabin space was so far above that of the Volkswagen, it felt as though I was in a luxury car. Today, clean examples of the 900 are harder to find, but this one looks nice:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 SAAB 900S Hatchback on eBay

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1992 Mercedes-Benz 300TE

Who says you can’t go home again? It seems like now more than ever the demand for nostalgic cars is thriving. Not just the really good stuff, but seemingly average cars that are extremely clean literally have people flowing in waves to check out and ultimately buy. Maybe because the 1980s and 1990s seemed like a simpler time, or because cars from that era literally were simpler. Combine that with the cars we lusted after growing up suddenly become available again and we don’t want to let this time pass us by. That leads me to an example of that, a 1992 Mercedes-Benz 300TE with just 18,000 miles. Either you grew up in one of these or wanted to grow up in one of these, the want for them is now strong even though it is a seemingly nondescript car in every way. Maybe that is a good thing?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 300TE on eBay

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Wolfsburg 3:16: A trio of modified Volkswagen GTI 16Vs

For some, the A2 is a religion and the GTI 16V is their prophet. Being that it’s the Christian Sabbath today (observed, at least – forget for a moment that it’s supposed to be Saturday!) I thought I’d take a look at a chosen few. The other meaning of sabbath, interestingly, is a meeting of witches with the Devil at midnight. Perhaps that’s more appropriate for these hot hatches, all of whom have a slightly evil temper and love mischief? Regardless, in the wake of the Rallye-inspired Golf this interesting trio of what were once original GTI 16Vs popped up, and all are worthy of a look. They range from mild to wild both in terms of mods and price. Are any of them winners?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Volkswagen GTI on eBay

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