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Tag: 1992

1992 Audi S4

I’ve started a few discussions about the Audi C4 and the relative lack of good examples that pop up. This is especially true when they’re compared to the models that the S4 originally competed in the marketplace against; the M5 and the 500E. While neither are generally spring chickens when it comes to the used car markets, it’s not very hard to find an excellent example of virtually any day. The same can’t be said for the original S4. The 1992 Audi S4 is arguably the hardest to come by, and for some enthusiasts it’s the most desirable. Sales numbers and enthusiast’s accounts of how many ’92s were sold seem to vary; the general number of ’92s imported is often claimed at 250, but Audi’s sales numbers from 1992 claim some 907 Turbo models were sold (though, that number could include leftover 200 20V and 200 Turbo models). While the later S6 and A6, externally, weren’t visually much different, the earlier S4 stood apart from the regular 100 with ellipsoid headlamps and the then-massive 16×8 Fuchs forged alloys. 1992 models sported the lower, closer to European-spec suspension and a rear sway bar, but there were other, smaller changes – ’92s had steel sunroofs, for example, and “quattro” script rear defrosters that disappeared in ’93. Then there were really small changes; like the V8 quattro, ’92s had the “high intensity” wash system for the windshield – dropped in ’93, along with the S4 badge on the right of the trunk. In ’93, it would move to the left, and “quattro” was added to the right to fall in line with other models. 1992 models were still R12 air conditioned, so upgrading to R134 is common. The seller is correct that ’92s interiors had Elm wood trim, where later models would switch to carbon fiber, then Walnut. ’92s also had a trip computer with digital boost gauge and an ABS-disable switch, which also would be removed from the lineup in 1993. Finding a clean example of these ’92s, then, for some enthusiasts represents the Holy Grail of U.S. bound S-cars. And this example, in the signature Pearlescent White Metallic with black leather, is arguably one of the best we’ve seen:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi S4 on eBay

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1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC – REVISIT

The low mileage 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC we featured back in March has reappeared. As I prepare for another trip back to Europe in a few days, one thing I enjoy is getting to see all the vehicles we are denied here in the US. A car that sticks out in my mind lately is the Volkswagen Scirocco. Perhaps Volkswagen might reconsider sending this sports coupe back to the US with the falling value of the Euro, but it seems unlikely. The last sports coupe we would see from Volkswagen would be the car we see here. Whether its the earlier G60 or later SLC, good examples are in short supply these days. This particular car has triggered a bidding frenzy, so it should be a good car to watch to see where the market currently stands for the VR6 engined Corrado.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site March 16, 2015:

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1992 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

Like the 930 before it, the 964 Turbo would end its run having used two different engines. The first, a refined version of the 930’s 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-six, was used out of necessity while Porsche completed development of a turbocharged version of the standard 3.6 liter engine that debuted with the 964 more generally. The second engine, then, was that 3.6 liter, which came on board for the ’93 and ’94 model years. After nearly 15 years of use, inspiring the dreams of many, and helping establish the 911 as one of the world’s preeminent sports coupes the turbocharged 3.3 was to be put to bed. But Porsche, a company which takes a particular delight in final year send-offs, wasn’t quite done with it yet. Enter the 1992 Porsche 911 3.3 Turbo S Leichtbau (Lightweight). As the name would suggest the 3.3 Turbo S was taken in a slightly different direction from other Turbos and provides a nice contrast with the later 3.6 Turbo S, the apex of 964 performance and luxury. This is more in the vein of the GT2: a lightened, track-oriented, rear-drive Turbo that would debut a few years later for the 993. The GT2 perhaps is a more extreme example, but as we can see here the 3.3 Turbo S was not intended to provide a high degree of refined cruising and this specific example even has a more extensive roll cage than other versions I’ve come across (as rare as that may be). All told 86 examples were produced making these one of the rarest 911s and another of the exquisite 964 variants.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau on Pannhorst Classics

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Edit 8/24/2017: A little over two years later, this RS has resurfaced on eBay with 70 more miles and about the same $400,000 asking price.

Another week, another wonderful 964 Carrera RS. This time, however, we’ve gone a little more aggressive in the color department with a Rubystone Red (Sternrubin) 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS with contrasting interior and just 19,919 miles on it. I recall that we featured a Rubystone 964 Turbo a while back and that 911 had a Grey interior that, frankly, was entirely unbefitting of the dynamism of the exterior. We have no such problem here as the black interior with purple and violet seat inserts provides the right balance of flash and subdued character that highlights, but doesn’t overshadow, that exterior. Inside or out, there should be no mistaking what this car is.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

At one point or another during my time writing for GCFSB I have had the opportunity to feature nearly every variant of the 964 and as I’ve noted in previous posts there is a ton of variability within the 964 model range. The exception, the car I have yet to feature, is the 964 Carrera RS, quite possibly the best of the breed, especially were we to stumble across the ultra-rare 3.8 RS, which sadly this one is not. Nevertheless, the 3.6 version is truly a fantastic machine. The US market had to settle for the RS America, a lightened low-option version of the Carrera 2, that never fully approached, nor did Porsche intend it to approach, the full-on Carrera RS of other markets. The Carrera RS used the tried-and-true method of more power/less weight, combining a higher output version of the 964’s 3.6 liter flax-six with significant weight reduction – coming in 155 kg lighter than a standard Carrera 2 – to provide the sort of no frills performance that 911 enthusiasts had long craved since the original RS. To wear that moniker, the coveted Carrera RS badge, requires a special car and the version for the 964 filled those shoes quite well. It showed how far this newly redesigned 911 could be pushed and continued Porsche’s history of melding excellent road-going manners with track-focused performance. The particular example we see here is a Maritime Blue 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS with a contrasting black and blue leather interior and just 20,005 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on 4 Star Classics

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