1991 Audi Coupe quattro

A few weeks ago, our reader John sent me a listing on Craigslist for this car. I immediately laughed. It’s not that the car was modified to look like an RS2 in the front and resprayed. On the surface, that’s pretty common and overall it looks reasonably done. It’s not that the car didn’t get a matching engine transplant; the unappreciated 20 valve normally aspirated 7A inline-5 is still there. It’s not that they didn’t do a 5-bolt conversion with larger brakes. No, what made me laugh was the color – Sprint Blue Pearl. That’s a B7-spec color, and while to non-Audi nerds it may not matter, it’s the wrong color. Nogaro Blue, technically, would also be the wrong color, since the RS2 was oft-anointed in the special shade of RS Blue. Now, technically that color seems to be the same color as the later B5-chassis shade, but nevertheless the person who repainted this car in the spirit of the RS managed to be 3 generations off in color. It’s that kind of attention to detail that always worries me about modified cars:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe quattro on eBay

Continue reading

1991 Audi Coupe Quattro with 17,000 Miles

For me, it’s been a week of some unappreciated cars, and the Audi Coupe Quattro ranks up there as one of the most unappreciated Audis. But unlike the wild turbocharged wonders that were available in the rest of the world, the U.S. market received only the 7A inline-5 20 valve motor. Basically, it was a 16V Volkswagen motor with one more cylinder; with a 7,200 rpm redline, the sonorous 5-pot put out a respectable 164 horsepower. That wasn’t much less than the E30 M3 had and matched U.S. bound turbocharged Quattros – but the power delivery was such that the car didn’t feel fast off the line, and the weight didn’t help. The B3 was hefty, saddled with improved safety options like PROCON-10, anti-lock brakes and a stronger platform, it was also decidedly more luxury oriented with electric seats, sunroof, windows, air conditioning and even an electronic lock for the differential in the rear. It was the 1980s Audis all grown up, but the impression left in many enthusiast’s mouths was that it was a bit soft and a bit slow. Ironically, the 7A even gained a bad reputation amongst enthusiasts as an underpowered unit that lacked torque – but a look at the original power numbers prove it was the most powerful of the non-turbo, non-V8 cars Audi offered at the time. 1992 would see a switch to the B4 platform with the V6 power unit and the end of B3 production; slow sales and a high price meant the Coupe Quattro was removed from the U.S. bound lineup after only a reported 1,500 made it here. Despite their perceived lack of sport, the legendarily stout Coupe Quattros served many of their owners well and many are still kicking around. Only one, though, is in the condition of today’s example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro at Sutherland Auto Sales

Continue reading

Fan Favorites: 1990 Audi Coupe, 1991 Audi V8 3.6 quattro 5-speed and 1995 Audi S6 Avant

Audi fans are an interesting bunch. To be fair, I think that most devoted followers of a specific brand in any circumstance are an interesting bunch, but knowing the Audi folks a bit I’m closer to the understanding. What I find interesting is that there’s such a schism between the model fans and who they attract. Each has a devoted following, and each of those groups is a microcosm in and of itself. Take my model group, for example – the Type 85. In that model group, there are the three major notables: the 4000 quattro, the Coupe GT, and of course the Quattro. Then within each of those subsets, there are further fan specializations; 84 4000S quattro versus the 85-87; early GT versus 85-87 and then the “87.5” crew; and of course each one of the model years of the Quattro has its followers. As with the GT, Audi fans have come to naming half model years to differentiate the upgrades; 87.5 GTs received a revised engine and brakes along with some other minor details, but then there are “95.5” S6s and “2001.5” S4s; heck, there are even “2005.5” S4s. Fans become semi-obsessed with differentiating each of the subset models and what makes them special. Today, though, seeing any of these cars in great shape is special to me – and these three each have their special fan base. Thanks to our reader John, here’s a roundup of three fan favorites that are sure to make some smile:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on craigslist

Continue reading

1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V – REVISIT

The 1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V that I wrote up early last month is back up for sale, with a substantially lowered “Buy It Now” price – now only $2,800 from $4,200. Clearly the seller is motivated to move this car, but these are solid, good performing and long-lived cars that are reasonably easy to work on. Parts are a tad bit hard to come by and expensive these days, but the price makes this rare Audi compelling.

The below post originally appeared on our site May 5, 2014:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V on eBay

Continue reading

Exceeding Expectations: 1986 Audi Coupe GT 20V Part 1

Nate’s M5 ownership experience that he wrote up got me thinking; it’s been now just over 16 years since I bought my 1986 Audi Coupe GT, and I’ve never really summed my ownership. It’s been a heck of a ride, to the point where my wife refers to the Audi as a “family member” that I’ll never get rid of. In many ways, she’s right – I’ve put a lot of heart, soul and sweat into that car and I’ll never get what I’ve put in back out of it monetarily, but the smiles that car has provided me could last a lifetime by themselves. It’s undergone many changes in my stay – from relatively stock to a highly modified track car, through 4 suspensions, 4 engines, 5 exhausts, 3 paint jobs and a few thousand miles on the race track, it’s been as much a friend as a possession.

Continue reading

1990 Audi 90 20V Quattro

While the Audi 100 Avant I wrote up the other day was certainly a treat to see, for most late 1980s and early 1990s Audi enthusiasts, the cars that they’re interested in are the quattro all-wheel drive models. There are certainly many popular ones to choose from; recently we’ve seen the 4000 quattro and S4 quattro really take off, but the 200 20V quattro and Coupe quattro also grace these pages on a regular basis. One car we don’t see much of, though, is the 90 20V quattro; effectively the same car as the Coupe underneath, these 90s were rare when new and are more rare today. Featuring the awesome 7A 20 valve 2.3 motor and the legendary quattro drive system, unlike the earlier 4000s they were galvanized, meaning at least some could survive life in the environment which they were designed to conquer:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi 90 20V Quattro on eBay

Continue reading

Motorsport Monday: A duo of crazy quattros – 1990 Audi 90s

Want to get into motorsport but lacking the budget to pick up a budget-racer like the Porsche 912 I wrote up earlier? Perhaps you own that 912, and just don’t want to trash it? Well, there are plenty of fun alternatives, and not all of them are on the beaten path. Take today’s twin 90s, for example. One has all the fun stuff to go through corners, and the other gets you there more quickly. Which would you prefer? Let’s start with the carver:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Coupe Quattro on craigslist

Continue reading

1991 Audi Coupe Quattro

The third generation Audi Coupe had big shoes to fill. The first generation 100 Coupe S, while not a big seller and not available in the U.S., is generally regarded as one of the more attractive German car designs in recent memory. Then there was the second generation Coupe, which in GT form was voted one of the best handling GT cars of the 1980s and was also an attractive design in its own right. But of course, both paled in comparison to the legendary Quattro, its impact celebrated universally now and rightfully afforded a place amongst the best and most influential cars in history. The replacement for these cars, then, had to be pretty special – and in many eyes, it just wasn’t – especially in U.S. form. Sure, the 20V normally aspirated engine was a great motor – but it was saddled with too much weight and the styling was rather bland compared to the fluid looks of the 100 and the angular awesomeness of the B2. Consequently and coupled with Audi’s image issues following the 60 minute debacle, not many of these Coupes sold in the U.S.. In spite of that, as there were with nearly every Audi model there was a devoted fan base that saw through the expensive pricing, the so-so performance and not particularly exciting styling to what was a quite competent highway car, capable of carrying a much better load than the cars it replaced with the new hatchback configuration, and as ever a snow machine. As these fell into second and third ownership, many turned towards the much more potent European versions for inspiration on how to correct the car that Audi sent to the U.S., and for good reason – the Euro versions were hands down better looking in either B3 or B4 version than what was sent here. Two decades on, the styling of this GT has aged pretty well compared to some of the contemporaries’ styling and these are handsome coupes overall. Today’s example is the last of the run for the U.S., but has been refreshed with Euro goodies and some paintwork that help it shrug off its many miles:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro on Quattroworld.com

Continue reading

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

While earlier this week I reviewed a importable 1989 Audi Coupe, the car we received in the United States in late 1989 was this car, the 1990 Coupe Quattro. While on paper the new B3 chassis car had specifications very similar to the U.S. spec Audi Quattro that it replaced, the truth was that the new Coupe sported much more luxury and the accompanying weight, dulling performance and making the car feel fairly sluggish. What the B3 coupes did gain was a much more user-friendly design and a less driver-dependent all-wheel drive system. With a commodious hatchback and fold-down seats, it was now easier to carry large items that the Quattro simply couldn’t fit. Further, where the early car had driver-selected lockable differentials, the new car sported the next generation of quattro, with Torsen torque-splitting diff in place of the old lockers and a electronic lockup for the rear that was disabled above 15 m.p.h.. Despite the dumbed-down for the driver but smarter for the car AWD system, these Coupes were nearly as good as the previous generation cars in snow and ice. They arrived expensive and at a bad time for Audi, so it’s no surprise that they’re a rare find these days:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

Continue reading

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

509

It’s been a few months since we posted the rare Ginster Yellow Coupe Quattro. That’s indicative of the market; coming by clean and well sorted Coupe Quattros or 90 20V Quattros is extraordinarily hard. Already rare cars to begin with, unmolested and clean examples are as rare as the proverbial hen’s tooth. Those that are unmolested are usually pushing 200,000 miles or in need of serious repair. However, once in a while a clean example pops up, as this sharp Pearlesant White with grey leather example proves today:

509

Year: 1990
Model: Coupe Quattro
Engine: 2.3 liter inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 126,000 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

This is the cleanest audi coupe that I have ever seen. It has new bbs 17″ wheel with new tires, (original speedline wheels included). This car is an early production model which has the tubular header. The car has many new parts including a new fuel pump and a new water pump. This car is also for sale locally. Please don’t hesitate to call with any questions, I can be reached at 908-685-2671 Tom

I’ll start off with the likes; like a big, all-wheel drive GTi, these cars are fun to drive. Though not seriously quick in stock form, they’re also not hugely slow, especially once on the move. Yes, you need to rev the 7A 20V to get the car to shift, but that’s where it makes great noises, so enjoy your trip up the tach – which you can easily do for the next 100,000 miles or more given proper maintenance. The early models have the stainless tubular header which is a work of art though unfortunately covered by the necessary heat shield. Some recent maintenance ticks the right boxes, and while Pearlesant may not be everyone’s favorite it sure fits the character of the late 80s/early 90s Audis well.

Is there a downside? Well, I don’t really feel like the wheels fit the car particularly well despite being one of the biggest BBS fans in the world. I’d rather see the mentioned Speedline wheels clean and on there. Want an upgrade? Plenty are available, such as these Team Dynamics wheels currently on Ebay (click the picture to link to the auction):

Otherwise, I think the only drawback is the entry price; clean Coupe Quattros have maintained a strong market in the mid to high single digits; still, it’s a lot of car for that amount – most enthusiasts are now considering $10,000 the number for a clean E30 non-M3 to put this into perspective. Ditch the US spec diving board bumpers for some S2 units, throw in some Euro lights and an S2 wheel, and if you have to go crazy, drop a 20V turbo into it; you’ll slay E30 M3s in a drag race and with proper suspension components, you can keep up with them around turns, too – all for less than half the amount of a well sorted M3, and you’ll be in a much more rare car. That’s a win to me.

On Ebay right now are some parts to dress it up and make it quicker (click the item to take you to the auction):

AAN 20V Turbo Motor

RS2 OEM Headlights

Audi Sport Nardi Steering wheel

-Carter