2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50

The 996 Turbo occupied a strange area of value in the Porsche world for a bit, though it generally seems like the market caught on. And its no wonder; the 996TT not only offers supercar levels of performance in a package which can exploit it, the macho looks overwhelm the uninspired headlights, and the Turbo motor doesn’t have the same IMS worries that the normally aspirated models have you worried about. On top of that, this particular car has the X50 performance package – a desirable option, with K24 turbos, a re-mapped ECU and GT2 intercoolers added to the 3.6 liter flat-6 netting 444 horsepower. This is mated to a 6-speed manual, too. And if you hadn’t noticed somehow, it’s a pretty special color – Speed Yellow – but following up on Andrew’s W111 this one has a very unusual and unexpected interior. If the great package, great options, and unusual color combination weren’t enough, this 2003 Turbo has just 8,500 miles on it. The price? Hang on to your fried eggs and wait until you see that interior:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 on eBay

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Almost S: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 Sonderwunsch/Exclusive

As they had with the 964 Turbo, Porsche continued the ultra-exclusive Turbo S package on the actually new 993 Turbo. With 430 horsepower pumped through two turbos to all four wheels, these were not as outrageous as the GT2, but plenty fast and luxurious to make up for it. Big yellow Brembos, a revised aerokit and flank vents that were a nod to the prior generation all helped to distinguish these cars. And with only 345 produced originally, from the get-go these were big dollar collectables. Of course, Porsche made a splash recently when it made a special brand-new one-off 993 Turbo S, ultimately selling it for a touch over $3,100,000.

So I’ll introduce this post by saying that this car is not one of the original Turbo S models. However, if anything, it’s a bit more interesting and even more exclusive. This car started life as a normal 993 Turbo, but was sent through the Porsche Special Wishes/Exclusive department (production coincided with rebranding of the Special Wishes Department to Porsche Exclusive) and given the bulk of the Turbo S details with a few GT2 bits thrown in for good measure. Further, it was then draped in a Paint To Sample color, Ocean Blue Metallic. The main difference between this car and a S is the rear spoiler and badges, which remained standard 993 Turbo items. In many ways, this car is the spiritual successor to the 911 Turbo S 3.6 ‘Package’ I just looked at, and it’s equally exclusive at a claimed one of two produced:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 on eBay

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1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 with 6,350 Miles

As I discussed in the ’91 911 Turbo post, while Porsche claimed that a fair amount (85%!) of the “new” Turbo was “new”, in reality it was an evolution of the ’89 Turbo wrapped in a smoother package. However, as our reader Howard pointed out in the comments, one very important change outside of the look was the suspension, which moved away from wooden carts the antiquated torsion bar setup to ‘modern’ coil springs. Coupled with the new limited-slip differential, anti-lock brakes and more sophisticated engine management (hence, smoother power delivery), the ’91 Turbo was a lot more livable in day-to-day situations.

Of course, that meant that it was possible to introduce even more power. Since the ’91 Turbo was a replacement for the defunct 965/969 V8 project, it made sense that Porsche hadn’t developed a new Turbo motor for the initial 964 Turbo launch. But for 1993, Porsche took the 964’s 3.6 liter and mated it with the turbocharger from the 3.3. The result was, of course, the Turbo 3.6. The extra displacement meant power was up 40 to 360 and torque 52 to 384 lb.ft, while both numbers were achieved lower in the rev range. To show off this new-found power, Porsche installed some fantastic Speedline-made Cup wheels and discrete “3.6” badging after the Turbo script. Despite the relative undercover looks, these are sought cars.

Today’s car is listed as one of the 288 Turbo 3.6s imported in ’94, and with a scant 6,350 miles on the odometer you know the price will be high. How high?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S 3.6 ‘Package’ on eBay

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1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

As the Turbo era died off in the early 90s and nearly everyone abandoned forced induction thanks to newer, more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards, Porsche’s ‘Gott verdammt, ve continue to do things the same vill!‘ attitude extended to boost. Instead of backing away from their somewhat flawed design, Porsche doubled down and launched a ‘brand new’ Turbo model of the 911 for 1991. I say ‘brand new’ because while the body looked modern and the interior updated, in reality this was the same old-school Porsche 911 Turbo underneath. It was still rear-drive only, still a single turbocharger with a ton of lag, and still capable of ripping your face off. Still displacing 3.3 liters, revisions to the intake, exhaust and ECU left the flat-6 churning 315 horsepower and 333 lb.ft of torque, the 964-era Turbo hit 60 in under 5 seconds if you threw caution to the wind and was within a breath of 170 flat-out. Outside, the 964’s smooth bumper covers replaced the impact-era units and 17″ Cup 1 wheels filled the flares, but squint and not much looked different from 15 years prior. Yet sure enough, newfangled technologies had crept in: anti-lock brakes, airbags, power steering *gasp!* In many ways, though modern and certainly capable of hanging with the best cars of the day if not exceeding their performance, they felt a bit like a dinosaur unabashedly sticking its middle claw up towards progress and the future. It’s that attitude, reputation and look that today continues to drive the desirability of this model in the used market:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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Zanzibar Red 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Here we have a Zanzibar Red 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe. I have seen Zanzibar in the flesh only once. It’s quite rare, but I think it’s a wonderful color. The German version of its name is Orangerot perleffekt. It’s a somewhat complicated combination though does describe the color pretty well. As the name implies the color is an orange-red blend that has the added effect of pearlescent metallic that Porsche has utilized with a few different colors and especially in the ’90s. I suppose it’s kind of like if we took the old Blood Orange/Tangerine from the ’70s and then gave it some sparkle to somewhat diminish its overall showiness. On a 996TT it looks pretty electric!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Zanzibar Red 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

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2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe

I feel like living a little lavishly today. Here we have a GT Silver Metallic 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S. It’s brand new and waiting to be purchased. The Turbo S itself combines the best of luxury and performance that Porsche can offer. It’s supercar performance that ensconces you in leather and comfort. There’s 580 hp directed to all four wheels. The dual-clutch 7-speed PDK transmission either can shift smooth and comfortably or put it in Sport Plus mode and it’ll bang home shifts as quickly and ferociously as possible. Rear-axle steering, center-lock wheels, and massive 410 mm six-piston ceramic brakes keep everything under control. The Turbo S isn’t quite the top of the luxury performance food chain since Porsche also offers the Turbo S Exclusive, but this will have to do for now.

This particular example has decided to turn the dial up just a little bit and that’s the reason I’m interested in it. For starters, it has carbon fiber wheels. They’ll set you back a mere $14,980. Please do not bump them into a curb. It’s fitted with the Turbo Aerokit, which adds a little dynamism to the exterior because you wouldn’t want passersby confusing this with a regular 911. The interior too receives a few carbon fiber accents helping to tie interior and exterior together. Also in that interior is the optional Burmester sound system. Frankly, if you’re willing to spring for the carbon wheels, I’d be disappointed if you didn’t also add the better sound.

All together I really like this Turbo S. I wish it wasn’t Silver, but it does seem to be making the most of what these cars have to offer and in that regard it’s a phenomenal example. And while not quite the Turbo S Exclusive it does come in around $50K less than one of those very limited models (and that’s without factoring in ADM).

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2019 Porsche 911 Turbo S Coupe on Rennlist

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Gelb Orange 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

I was scrolling through the Excellence Magazine classifieds and it seemed mostly typical. A lot doesn’t stand out and there was a lot that I had seen previously. I started to notice that there were a number of interesting cars available from Bologna, Italy. That seemed a little random. The cars were nice, but for the most part they weren’t really standing out to me given the high prices being asked. And suddenly I saw this one and stopped dead.

Ok, so the high price hasn’t changed, but I’d bet it’s near impossible to look through a list of Porsches and not take especial notice of this 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe. The color is listed as paint-to-sample Gelb Orange – meaning yellow-orange or perhaps amber orange. As far as I know it isn’t one of Porsche’s official offerings. I have never seen nor heard of it. It’s not quite Signal Orange nor Signal Yellow. The orange hue is a bit deeper than we see with Signal Yellow, but not quite as pronounced as Signal Orange. It sits almost squarely between the two.

Signal Yellow is my favorite Porsche color. It looks amazing on just about any 911 from any period. While it’s not fair to judge based off of a single car, I might actually like this one better.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Gelb Orange 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on Excellence Magazine

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1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Here we have another 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S. The final climax of the air-cooled 911 and quite rare. This one is not a ridiculously low-mileage garage queen like the last Turbo S I featured. While it’s hard to call any twenty-year-old 911 reasonably priced at almost $300K that’s pretty much exactly what we have with this one. Of course, there are reasons for that reasonableness. In this case, a touch over 80K miles and an engine rebuild account for the discount. Even so, is it worth it? It’s still around $100K more expensive than a low-mileage non-S 993TT and you likely could buy 2 of those if you allowed for comparable mileage and condition. Such is the cost of rarity.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I like a certain degree of completeness so why not go ahead and bookend things? This Black 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera resides at the other end of the 930 spectrum from the 1989 930 I featured on Monday. It isn’t from the first year of 930 production so this isn’t the perfect comparison, but since it is from one of the first two years when the 930 utilized a 3.0 liter turbocharged engine without an intercooler it still provides a glimpse into the model’s early days.

Looking at them both you could easily mistake one for the other. Their dimensions are the same even if the ’89 has gained a couple hundred pounds so you won’t notice much there. The most obvious difference is the rear spoiler. Porsche modified the 930’s spoiler in ’78 so as to accommodate the new intercooler that would feed air into the larger 3.3 liter engine. It has much more pronounced wings, which has garnered it the name tea tray compared with the whale tail of the 3.0 liter models. The fog lights too are different as they became integrated into the front bumper. We notice the same difference when comparing the 911SC and 3.2 Carrera.

While the outside is quite similar, the differences in the interior are much more apparent and show the evolutionary changes of the 911 in general over this time. We find a similar evolutionary development under the skin. Naturally power increased and with it came larger 4-piston ventilated disc brakes. The 930 now could stop as well as it could go. And, of course, in 1989 Porsche fitted the 930 with the G50 5-speed transmission, the biggest change these cars had seen since their displacement increase in 1978.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1989 Porsche 930 Coupe

How do we explain the 930? It’s appeal seems both undeniable, but also uncertain. It’s raw and powerful and appeals to all of our childish sensibilities. It’s kind of a Hot Wheels car come to life. In some cases you might really think that’s what has happened. But we’re grown now and not everyone wants a car with a massive spoiler and bulging rear fenders. All of that power requires your full attention in a world where paying attention has become a novelty. But there are times when I look at one – and I’m sure some of you do as well – and can’t think of why I might want something else.

Here we have a triple black 1989 Porsche 930 Coupe with 80,457 miles on it. This comes from the final year of 930 production, a significant point for those in search of one of these turbos since it was the only year Porsche equipped them with a 5-speed manual transmission rather than the previously utilized 4-speed manual.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

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