Porsches Past: 1981 Porsche 924 GTP

Pablo over at flüssig magazine tipped us off to a rare 924GTP for sale in Germany, a template for what would ultimately become the 944. Sit back and enjoy another history lesson courtesy of our water-cooled Porsche guru.

The ‘P’ stood for prototype…this car was the 944 prototype and secrecy had to be kept for two more weeks; the 924 GTP, chassis 924-006.

Under the hood, the engine was pure Porsche. Their first water-cooled four cylinder engine Typ 944/71 (internal designation Typ 949), derived from half of the 928’s V8 but of completely new design, displacing 2.5 liters (2,479cc). Utilizing dry-sump lubrication and placed into the engine compartment at a 45 degree angle, this large capacity was obtained with huge 100 mm bores and a relatively short 78.9 mm stroke. But there was something a bit different going on above those bores…an all new sixteen valve head coupled with a KKK K28 exhaust driven turbocharger breathing in through an air to air intercooler.

Let’s talk about the cylinder head since it bears special mention here. This was a one-off design by Dipl. Ing. Hans Metzger, and although you might think, “ah, so that’s the one that they used for the 944S!”

And you’d be wrong.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924 GTP

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10K Friday Poor-sche Edition: 928S4 v. 944 v. 944 Turbo v. 924 v. 944 S2 v. Boxster v. Boxster S

“Poor Man’s Porsche”; while it’s a moniker usually attached to the 924 series, the reality is these days it applies to everything outside of the 911. The surge in 911 prices has been so great, that it has also pulled other lesser alternatives to the 911 up as well – try to get into a clean 912 and you’ll be surprised by the price. Even the lowly, forgotten 914 is in the mid teens for a really clean example of a flat-4 model up towards $100,000 for original 914-6 models. So does this mean you need 6-figures to be a true Porsche enthusiast? I don’t believe that’s the case – I think there are a plethora of great options at or around $10,000, so I’ve lined up an assortment. Which do you think is most worthy of wearing the crest of Stuttgart?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 928S4 on eBay

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1980 Porsche 924 Turbo

It probably sounds crazy, but I find the 924 Turbo pretty fascinating. Born at a time when smaller displacement turbocharged engines were the wave of the future and the rage in motorsport, the 924 is still one of the most aerodynamic cars to make it to the public. This resulted in good fuel economy, which combined with hatchback practicality meant it was a reasonable daily driver. But the weight distribution and turbocharged power plant meant it was at home on the track, too – in turned up Carrera GT, GTS and GTR versions it was a hugely successful race car. It was good looking, too – subtle curves, great ATS wheels and just enough vents and ducts to hint at performance potential. Really, it’s a great package – but in spite of this 924s in general remain one of the cheapest Porsches available. That means you can get into one for quite a deal these days while the rest of the market continues to pull out of reach:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay

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1977 Porsche 924 Martini & Rossi Edition – REVISIT

The 1977 Porsche 924 Martini & Rossi Edition has reappeared at auction, due to a high bidder who failed to get in touch with the seller. Back up for auction, this is your chance to get an affordable slice of what happens to be one of the most popular racing liveries of all time.

The below post originally appeared on our site April 1, 2014:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini & Rossi Edition on eBay

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1981 Porsche 924GTS Clubsport

Over the past few weeks, we’ve written up a few Low mileage 924s and even a rare to see 924 Turbo, but if it’s a rare site to see those cars come up for sale in good shape, it’s just downright rare to find their overachieving brothers for sale at all. Porsche took the already fairly potent for its day 924 Turbo and upped the ante to take it racing; but they did more than just add the already famous monkier “Carrera” to the name. The 924 Carrera GT sported big flares, bigger spoilers, bigger wheels, bigger brakes, and all to deal with the massive increase in power. It was available in three different trim levels; the standard GT got an impressive 210 horsepower; moving up to the “GTS” got you 245 horses. But if you were a real racer, you opted for the 924 Carrera GTS Clubsport – with 280 horsepower and set up to race with a cage and race seats, this was a race car you could road register:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924GTS Clubsport at Jan B. Lühn

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1980 Porsche 924 Turbo with 37,000 miles

Last week, I wrote up a clean and original 1982 924 Coupe, a reminder of the relatively unloved father of the much more appreciated 944 and 968. Despite there being many of these good handling, fun to drive and affordable Porsches available in very good condition, most people still stay away from them because they’re “not true Porsches”. Perhaps even more unloved than the 924 is the more potent version of the aerodynamic coupe, the 924 Turbo. This is probably due to the generally unloved nature of the 924, which resulted in low residual value for what was at the time a complicated and expensive car. Today, finding a good condition 924 Turbo is more difficult than finding regular original 924 coupes, but there’s a nice one on Ebay today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay

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1982 Porsche 924

The enthusiast world is a pretty interesting and fickle place. Take a small displacement, lightweight and attractive coupe from the late 1970s/early 1980s, put a Volkswagen Scirocco badge on it and people fork over $8-10,000 for a very clean example. Take the same formula, put a Porsche badge on it and call it a 924, and very few want in and feel that over $5,000 – even for a very clean example – is sometimes too much. Such is the case with most of the early – and for that matter, late – Porsche 924s we’ve looked at recently. Unlike it’s bigger brother 944, we seem to see a large amount of clean, low mile all original 924s. Paul recently looked at a neat 1977 Porsche 924 that really embodied how clean and good looking the original design was. Today’s example is a little later in the production run, and in more classic to see Guards Red – but in equally impressive condition:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 924 on eBay

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1977 Porsche 924

It ain’t easy being green. Well, when it came to being the Porsche 924, it wasn’t easy just being. Porsche traditionalists weren’t keen on this front engined coupe with a power plant shared with an Audi. But, over time these early water-cooled Porsches have built a respectable fan base with prices staying at a reasonable level. This early 924 is genesis when it comes to the 924/944/968 series. Certainly a car that will grab the attention of P-car enthusiasts who appreciate these models in their purist form.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 on eBay

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10K Friday: Poor Man’s Porsches – 914 v. 924

While I’ve spent a lot of time on 10K Fridays looking for the most car for your money, today we’re going to take a different path and look at the least Porsche for your money. Sound a bit strange? Well, while other Porsche models have taken off in value or are on the verge of being completely unaffordable, it’s refreshing to know you can still get a nice quality Porsche on a budget. Could you get into a beaten 944 Turbo for this money? Yes, and perhaps if you’re looking for a performance car that would be a better choice. But in the true spirit of the creation of both the 914 and 924, I want to look at the most simple versions of both of these cars. Which would be the one for you? Let’s start with the 914:

Year: 1972
Model: 914
Engine: 1.7 liter flat-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 100,000 mi
Price: $7,500 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Porsche 914 on eBay

1972 914 porsche from california new tires fuel injected very rust free for more info call dennis 847 521 9442

I have to admit, I’m a more recent convert to thinking clean 914s are pretty cool. They’re not the most attractive by any measure, but they have a Lotus-like simple design. Think of this car as the Porsche Europa and it makes a little more sense. Pop the top and you’ve got a fun, simple targa design. This model has some upgraded alloys and looks reasonably clean. Miles are lower and the price – $7,500 – wouldn’t get you into much of any other Porsche; that is, except the underdog 924:

The 924 is such a clean and elegant design, it’s nice to see them in their original spec. Sure, they sprouted flares, spoilers and big wheels and became more aggressive but the original design is still impressive. With that engine running well, you’ll be in the mid-30 mpg range cruising in what is still a very aerodynamic design today. In Guards Red over tan, this is a great looker:

Year: 1981
Model: 924
Engine: 2.0 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 29,574 mi
Price: $5,995 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 924 on eBay

Runs and drives very well. The body and paint are in very good condition. The interior is in good shape, but the seats have rips and the dash is cracked. Has a clear title.

Yes, the engine is anemic, and like many of the early 924/944 variants the dash is now cracked. But for a full $1500 less than the 914, this package is really quite neat. Like the Targa roof on the 914? Well, most of the top of the 924 is removable and ultimately the experience isn’t that different. This particular 924 was well equipped and with very low miles seems in great shape! The price is high for a non-2.5 924, but considering the condition it would be a better deal than buying a worse-condition one and trying to restore it. Not many love the 924, but it is pretty amazing that nearly two decades after it’s launch the 968 was still looking fresh with effectively this same design.

Which would I choose? For me, it’s a no-brainer – I’d choose the 924 over the 914 any day. As an affordable classic and entry level car in the Porsche world, it’s still unappreciated and values reflect that, but it’s a clean and neat design that can be owned on a strict budget – not something that can be said of many Porsches!

-Carter