2001 Porsche 911 Turbo

The last time I looked at a Porsche 911, I proclaimed that in the right application, a nice amount of wood isn’t a bad thing at all. It turns an already good car in something a little different, and clearly I’m not the only one who feels that way as that car seems to have already sold. However, Porsche didn’t always get it right when it came to putting wood inside the 911. Case in point, today’s car. This 2001 911 Turbo up for sale in Illinois is finished in Black over Natural Brown leather with the light wood interior package. Sounds great, right? Not exactly. You’ll understand what I mean when you look inside this car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S

Wood trim in a Porsche 911 has always been an interesting debate. On one side, this is a pure sports car, leave the wood for BMW and Mercedes-Benz if you want luxury. On the other, some will argue that this is also a GT car and having some wood on the dash, steering wheel, and where ever else they could put it is just fine. Clearly buyers want this, because billion dollar car companies don’t just blindly do things without tons of research and market analysis, no matter how much we want to believe they do. This 2006 911 C2S has some wood on the inside and not just the shift knob and steering. No, this 997.1 is optioned with the Makassar Package to finished off the Sea Blue interior just right in my eyes. Wait until you see it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche 911 Carrera S at U Drive Automobiles

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2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

About a month ago I took a look at one of the strangest colors I’ve seen on a Porsche 911. It wasn’t the actual color that was strange, but rather the name of literally “Ferrari-Yellow.” Like I mentioned, Porsche would rather shut the company down rather than put a competitors name on one of their cars now, but it looks like the lure of the Ferrari-Yellow goes further than we thought. Today, I wanted to look at the next generation of that car, the 996 C4S. This 2004 for sale in New York is finished in the popular “Speed yellow” and just like the 993, has the turbo-twist wheels, matching calipers, and some extra bits of yellow on the interior. However, they really went all out with the yellow on this car. Just wait until you see.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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1987 Porsche 944 Turbo

1987 saw some minor changes to the fantastic forced-induction 944 Turbo; most notable was the addition of ABS, which meant no more Fuchs. Instead, higher offset ‘Phone Dials’ were added, with an option for the forged ‘Gullideckel’ polished wheels. The other change was in color combinations available. Azurite Blue replaced Copenhagen Blue in the dark tones, while two new standard colors were introduced – Lemon/Summer Yellow (LMIA) and Malven Red (LY3E). Both of these colors were a one-year only option on the 944, and both are pretty rare to see. I looked at a Lemon/Summer Yellow ’87 Turbo back in 2016:

Summer Dreaming: 1987 Porsche 944 Turbo

But I think this is the first time I’ve seen a Malven Red Turbo, and it looks like a good one to consider:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

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Roll the Dice: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo

It seems to me that unless you are buying new, a Porsche 911 Turbo isn’t a bad place to park your money and still actually have a car to drive around. If you are buying a new 911 Turbo, you have a level of wealth where the deprecation on your car probably doesn’t matter all that much to you anyway. Enter the 996 Turbo. By far the most inexpensive 911 Turbo, these wasserboxer examples still offer a ton of bang for the buck. Looking at recent auction data, the majority of these cars sell for somewhere in the mid-$30,000 up to about $60,000 for the low mile and rare color examples. Anything outside of that range usually has something exceptional about it, both good and bad, and today’s car is exactly that.

This 2001 911 Turbo up for sale in Connecticut is a black on black example with with just over 87,000 miles. It has some cool options like a full carbon fiber trim kit, crests in the headrests, and navigation. However, it is much less than the usually floor that these usually trades hands at. There is always a catch.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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2012 Porsche 911

For a much love as I give all the Porsche GT and Turbo cars, very rarely do I look at the standard 911 Carrera. Rightfully so as those headline-capturing GT and Turbo cars can basically go toe-to-toe with any car in the world and hold their own, but that certainly doesn’t make the base 911 any less good. This is especially true on the 991 chassis. The lowly base 911 is hardly that. It came in at a respectable 350 horsepower and a choice between the 7-speed PDK gearbox or a 7-speed traditional manual transaxle that was a world-first at the time. A 0-60 run needed just 4.4 seconds and this all could be done in a package tame enough to drive 365 days a year with no fuss. The price wasn’t cheap however as the base 991 started at $83,000. I wish I could put “started” in size 84 font as stuff you think would be standard can easily tack on another $10,000 without even realizing it. Got to have those 14-way sport seats, after all.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Porsche 911 on eBay

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2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50

The 996 Turbo occupied a strange area of value in the Porsche world for a bit, though it generally seems like the market caught on. And its no wonder; the 996TT not only offers supercar levels of performance in a package which can exploit it, the macho looks overwhelm the uninspired headlights, and the Turbo motor doesn’t have the same IMS worries that the normally aspirated models have you worried about. On top of that, this particular car has the X50 performance package – a desirable option, with K24 turbos, a re-mapped ECU and GT2 intercoolers added to the 3.6 liter flat-6 netting 444 horsepower. This is mated to a 6-speed manual, too. And if you hadn’t noticed somehow, it’s a pretty special color – Speed Yellow – but following up on Andrew’s W111 this one has a very unusual and unexpected interior. If the great package, great options, and unusual color combination weren’t enough, this 2003 Turbo has just 8,500 miles on it. The price? Hang on to your fried eggs and wait until you see that interior:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 on eBay

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2004 Porsche 911 GT3

Do you have roughly $65,000 burning a hole in your pocket? I have just the car for you. Well, at least the specific model. I know I’m not exactly predicting the lottery numbers here, but if you were on the fence about buying a 996 Porsche GT3, get off that fence and do it. These are not going to ever be cheaper than they are right now and it already seems like people are snagging them up and putting giant mark-ups on them just because they can. There are still good deals out there to be found if you look hard enough, but I suspect that isn’t going to be for long. Today’s car, a 2004 GT3 up for sale in Seattle, is offered at a Ferrari dealer so that means you are basically paying for the privilege of the staff there to acknowledge your existence. Still, I’ve seen worse deals out there.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 on Dupont Registry

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1978 Porsche 928

When I was about 5 years old, my father took me to the Porsche dealership. Rows of new arrivals from Zuffenhausen lined up, a cornucopia of Easter egg-colored speed machines. In 1983, the low, organic, flowing shapes of the 911 and 944 stood in vast contrast to the bulk of three-box designs that proliferated the marketplace. But there was one shape that really stuck out to me – the 928.

In 1983, Porsche hadn’t yet abandoned its hope that the 928 would ascend to the top of the Porsche model lineup, and because of this I don’t remember seeing any 928s outside. Where I did see them was inside the showroom, where I distinctly remember one residing. My father was taken by the 911 (still is, to this day), and perhaps it was a father-versus-son stereotypical response, but the air-cooled model looked old and antiquated. The 928 was, both literally and figuratively, the antithesis of the 911. Water-cooled, front-engined, Grand Touring. It looked like a spaceship both inside and out. Clearly, this was the future I was witnessing.

Yet the 928, for all its press and relative market success, never caught completely on. It was never able to wrest the crown from the 911 as the signature model for Porsche. But what is perhaps most surprising to me is that it is one of the few cars that today, over forty years gone from its design phase, that unlike basically every other car model produced in the 1970s and 1980s, it still looks futuristic today. Okay, admittedly, the plastics have aged, tiny wheels with big, comfy side walls are no longer the norm and flush-fitted windows, lights, locks and antenna would clean the design up significantly. But compare this design to a few contemporaries, for a moment – the 1976 Chrysler New Yorker, the Toyota Cressida, or the Fiat 128. Three different nations, three different versions of the present, none anywhere near as revolutionary as the design that sits here:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 928 on 928Classics.com

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1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

You can file this one under the “strange but true” category. This 1997 Porsche 911 C4S is finished in paint-to-sample yellow. However, this isn’t just any yellow. This is literally Ferrari yellow. It says “Ferrari” right on the door jam sticker. Ferrari’s name for the color is Giallo Modena because they are Italians, but Porsche calls this Ferrari-Gelb. (Literally Ferrari-Yellow) I would of loved to have heard the conversation in Stuttgart when the buyer asked for a paint to sample in a car literally from a competing brand. My guess is this was a very important person who spent a lot of money with Porsche over the years because Porsche doesn’t exactly bend over backwards for anyone off the street and they certainly don’t do it for less than those giant bags with ‘$‘ on the side of them. Given the paint to sample, you would be correct to guess this one also has some other cool little touches.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S at Klassik Sportwagen

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