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Tag: rare Audi

1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Why would anyone even contemplate paying over $70,000 for a 27-year-old, complicated, and turbocharged Audi wagon? Because of the badge that adorns the front – the magical ‘Renn’ added to the S2 badge, along with the legendary name Porsche scripted below. That meant that this relatively unassuming Audi 80 quattro Avant had been produced in Zuffenhausen on the 959 production line rather than Ingolstadt or Neckarsulm and had added a healthy dose of even more “Sport” to the small chassis. Ostensibly, though the Sport Quattro was the first RS vehicle, the RS2 was the first to wear the badge which has become synonymous with Audi’s speed department. For many Audi aficionados, though the RS vehicles have become much faster and more luxurious, just as the with W124 500E and the E30 M3 Audi has never made a car better in its overall execution than the original. Not that it was slow by any means; Porsche’s massaging of the ADU inline-5 resulted in 311 horsepower – even more than the Sport Quattro had from essentially a very similar motor.

So despite being much heavier than the Sport had been, the RS2 wasn’t much slower; sub-5 seconds to 60 and a top speed north of 160 mph. Along the way, it was capable of bullying everything outside of a supercar; yet this car also established the move from Audi’s 2-door halo vehicle to a long line of fast five doors. Porsche also upgraded the brakes and wheels with Brembo units and 17″ Cup wheels creating a signature look, and tacked on 911 mirrors for good measure.This car was legendary from the start, and the upgrades to the motors and wheels spawned an entire generation of enthusiasts to turn up their inline-5s stateside. Now that these cars are legal for importation, though, it’s possible to find the forbidden fruit already imported:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant on eBay

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1991 Audi Coupe Quattro

This B3 sold for $4,150 on May 13, 2022.

Time to consider another Audi icon – the Coupe Quattro. Of course, it was quite hard to follow the original act, but in Europe alongside the RR Quattro 20V was the all-new B3 generation S2. Performance was about par between them, but they had intensely different characters. The new car was safer, quieter, more round, and a lot more practical – while the original Quattro had always looked like it had a hatchback, it was the successor that actually had one.

Of course, in the U.S. we didn’t receive the S2. The Coupe Quattro made due with a thoroughly upgraded 2.3 liter DOHC 20V motor – the 7A. Deep in the middle of the recession and not fully recovered from Audi’s 60 Minutes debacle, the very expensive Coupe Quattro sold slowly. A total of approximately 1,700 of them were imported at over $30,000 each. Considering the cost, the performance was rather soft; the heavy Coupe sported only 164 horsepower and though it was smooth and reasonably quick on the highway, off-the-line performance was lackluster at best. Still, though the internet fora would have you believe otherwise, performance between the U.S.-spec Coupe and original Quattro was pretty similar.

Options on the Coupe were limited to the Cold Weather package, 8-way power seats, and Pearlescent White Metallic paint – two of which are seen here on this Tornado Red ’91. ’91s also had the upgraded glass moonroof rather than the early steel panel, though they lost the infamous “Bag of Snakes” tubular header early models carried. ’91s also gained rear sway bars and are the rarest of the bunch, with only 364 sold in the model year and a further 58 traded as leftovers. This one is probably more of a project than most would want to take on, but let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

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1972 Audi 60

The Audi…60? Yep, you read that right. For a short time after the union of NSU-Auto Union and Audi in 1969, Audi launched a series of model names that were in effect slightly reworked DKW F102s from the early 1960s. If they look like older Mercedes-Benz models, you have a good eye – in fact, for a short time Daimler-Benz owned Auto Union, and the F102 had been updated during their ownership from the oddball two-stroke engines DKW utilized to new Mercedes-Benz four-stroke powerplants – the M118, which was unique to Audi’s use and only lasted a short time. With displacements between 1.5 and 1.8 liters, the F103 came in three power outputs initially; 72 horsepower, 80 horsepower, and 90 horsepower – and as a consequence were named the Audi 72, 80, and Super 90. In 1968, the 72 was replaced by the 75, and a new, lower-output version was launched; the Audi 60, which actually only had 54 horsepower. As mentioned these were short-lived cars, because in 1972 the revolutionary Volkswagen EA827 water-cooled motor was used and slotted into every pretty much everything the company produced.

The F103 is thus a strange bit of Audi history, helping to cement the brand’s reintroduction. A bit over 400,000 were made, which doesn’t sound too bad – except that the follow-up B1 chassis sold nearly three times that amount in about the same amount of time. Sufficed to say, these are rare cars to come across today, but a nice-looking ’72 – the last model year for the F103 – popped up in North Carolina. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Audi 60 on eBay

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2006 Audi TT Roadster 3.2 quattro

VAG’s decisions on who would be able to shift their own gears have always been a bit confusing, but the period of the 3.2 VR6 is really where this came to a head for U.S. customers. In 2004, Volkswagen brought their hottest Golf (finally!) to our market, featuring the singing VR6 in 6-speed manual only form with the R32. Great, but Audi offered the same platform in slinkier TT 3.2 Quattro form. However, fans of manual shifting were overlooked as Audi opted to bring the top TT here only with DSG.

On its way out of production, Audi threw the kitchen sink of options at the top-spec TTs; you could get Celebration 18″ alloy wheels, baseball optic leather upholstery, navigation, Bose sound, and a bunch of other special equipment. Additionally, the 3.2s came standard with most of the lower-range optional equipment, such as xenon headlights and a power-operated top – and the 3.2’s got a neat vented front bumper cover that was also shared with some special European-only models like the Clubsport. Today, they’re harder to find than most TTs, but that doesn’t always mean they’re super expensive:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Audi TT Roadster 3.2 quattro on eBay

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2003 Audi A8L

While they’re no longer the largest, fastest or most luxurious executive sport sedans on the market, the D2 Audi A8/S8 does still offer enthusiasts a substantial package for a very unsubstantial amount of money. While I’ve spent a lot of time previously covering my favorite S8 models, the normal A8 and stretched A8L tone down the sport but also come to the market at an even more budget-friendly price. To maximize your value, look towards the A8L models. These were expensive sedans back in the early 2000s, though today’s prices really dwarf the MSRP of $67,200 for the lang model. Still, corrected for inflation that is about $100k in buying power today – far from a pittance.

This all brings us to today’s A8L. Let’s say you really wanted one, but you didn’t want anything wrong with it. Well, that’s apparently what happened with this particular example; 2Bennett Audimotive gave it a more-or-less ‘open checkbook’ mechanical overhaul to the tune of $40k, replete with a few S8 modifications. Impressive? Not as impressive as the asking price today, so put the coffee down.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Audi A8L on Hemmings

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