1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe

I am a little excited about this car. Here we have a Forest Green Metallic 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe, located in Houston, with a variety of rare options including Recaro classic sport seats and the performance kit that raised output to 330 hp. It has traveled – using the term quite loosely – a mere 217 kilometers over the course of its life. As a final-year 930 this particular example sits as a museum piece showcasing some of the unique history of these machines.

So why my excitement? Well, no lie, I have had my eyes on this car for years, though I’ve never seen it. What I mean by that seemingly contradictory statement is that for as long as I can remember I have seen this 930 listed on RPM’s classifieds and it was clear from the description that it was a special car. The ultra-low mileage obviously makes it super special, but even with more typical mileage it’s still a special car. However, it always was listed as “pictures coming soon.” I began to wonder if it actually existed. Finally it does. I can’t say I know precisely when everything was posted, but I happened over to their site earlier this week and there it was. I am not disappointed.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe at RPM Sportscars

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1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – Sonderwunsch

Porsche’s Sonderwunsch Programm – now known as Porsche Exclusive – provides customers with a wide array of options to make their car just that extra bit more special. The most well known vehicle to pass through their doors probably was the original Slantnose 930, which took the excessive performance of the 911 Turbo and gave it a front-end to match. Then there are even rarer, but less obviously special ordered, examples like the 993 Speedster, commissioned by Jerry Seinfeld, but most commonly cars ordered through the Sonderwunsch Programm showcase one consistent feature: color. There is, of course, a (significant) cost associated with making such choices and we always enjoy coming across these cars with their unique color combinations, especially in the interior where we are more likely to see greater diversity among the various trim pieces, carpets, and seats. Occasionally these Special Wishes cars are tame with only an external color choice that most may not even realize was specially ordered. In other cases they can be downright wild – for better or worse. The one we see here, a 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe, located in Alabama, appears to have found a nice middle ground with plenty of details that set it apart from any standard 911, but without going crazy. The color combination may not be to everyone’s liking, but I would assume that would have more to do with individual color preferences rather than the particular choices made here. I think the choices made here were fantastic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet

As the last of the classically-styled 911 models, I’ve always had a particular fondness for the late-80s 911s more than any other iteration. Known also as the 930, the Turbo version of these cars was introduced in 1975 as the first turbo-charged version of the 911 and featured a 3.0 liter flat-6 that produced 256 bhp. Enlarged to 3.3 liters in 1978 and fitted with an intercooler, engine output was raised to 300 bhp, which resulted in a very quick car that, due to being rear-engined and suffering from turbo lag, was somewhat at odds with the laws of physics.

After briefly being removed from the US lineup due to emission regulations, the 930 returned in 1986 with a slightly lower output 3.3 liter engine (282hp) and for 1989, the last year of this model’s production, it received a 5-speed manual transmission. In addition, Porsche’s Sonderwunsch (“Special Wishes”) Program allowed 911 buyers to customize their car in a variety of ways, most famously through the availability of a flatnose version of the 930. But sometimes an owner simply wanted to upgrade the interior, which brings us to the car featured here today. This 1989 911 Turbo Cabriolet, located in Texas, with just under 21,000 miles has had its interior specially fitted almost entirely in burgundy leather.

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Year: 1989
Model: 911 Turbo Cabriolet
Engine: 3.3 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 20,900 mi
Price: $92,500 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet on eBay

Diamond blue metallic/Burgundy, 20,900 mi, factory “Special Wishes” leather interior options, limited slip, supple leather, heated seat-left, short shifter, steering wheel with raised hub, velour luggage compartment, fresh service with new tires, $102,999 MSRP, immaculate condition.

Factory “Special Wishes” Options

Special leather enclosed speakers
Special leather center console with additional instruments
Light rootwood dashboard
Leather instrument rings
Leather door lock rosette and knobs
Leather ignition lock rosette
Leather control knobs (4)
Leather glove box knob
Leather turn signal/wiper switch
Leather fresh air vents side dash
Leather heat/vent control knobs
Leather shift lever cover
Leather shift lever knob
Lighted make-up mirror, right sunvisor
Belt line leather- burgundy

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I’ll just come right out with it: I love the interior. Burgundy is easily my favorite color for a leather interior and I wish it was available more frequently. The original buyer of this car clearly felt the same since it appears that anything that could be covered in burgundy leather, has been covered in burgundy leather. For some, it might be a bit too monochrome, but I think it’s gorgeous. I’m not sure I’ll ever appreciate the dissymmetry of the whale tail on a cabriolet (I love a whale tail on the coupe), but regardless, it’s still an eye-catching car. The asking price, however, is at the top of the scale for a 911 of this vintage and while it is low mileage, quite unique, and the Sonderwunsch options were very expensive, I think it would take a very particular buyer for it to sell at $92,500. Without the “Special Wishes” options a car like this probably goes for around $70,000. So at $90,000+ we’re looking at a pretty high premium, no matter how beautiful the leather.

-Rob

1988 Porsche 930 Slantnose Sonderwunsch

In an era when cars look more and more alike, enthusiasts with the means will always seek out a way to have something unique that is tailored to their tastes. Case in point, the Porsche “Sonderwunsch” program, which is currently known as Porsche Exclusive. This program offers buyers the opportunity to specify options and configurations not normally seen in the standard Porsche lineup, such as the famous 964 Speedster Widebody, a particular body or interior color to sample, or in the case of this 930 Turbo for sale in San Francisco, the Flachbau, or Slantnose option.

My fellow contributor Brian and I look back on the 1980s with fond memories from time to time and this 930 Slantnose pretty much epitomizes the era, in the same way the Testarossa did for Ferrari and the Countach did for Lamborghini. Finished in Grand Prix White with Fuchs wheels to match, it doesn’t get much more over the top than this.

1988 Porsche 930 Turbo Slantnose on eBay

GP White over Black 4-speed, 3.3 Turbo, upgraded turbocharger, Ruf intercooler, $103k MSRP. This is a factory M505 steel slantnose coupe and is 1 of 271 total cars built in 1988. Options include: steering wheel with raised hub, Heated seat left and right, LSD, GP White Fuchs, left seat lumbar support, velour luggage compartment, supple leather. $13k of recent maintenance including new clutch, engine reseal. Speedline multi-piece 18″ wheels are available separately for $5,500.

Like many 911s, values for the 930 Turbo have been strong over the years, and for those with the Slantnose option, even more so. It’s fairly rare that I see a high mileage Slantnose, as those who bought these cars typically had a stable of toys to choose from. For a 24 year old car then, the 40,000 miles covered is typical for one of these sports cars. If this were a 930 without the Slantnose, we might be looking at a $40,000 to $60,000 car, depending on mileage and provenance. At $70,000, this seems to be in the ballpark for what a Slantnose is worth, as I’ve seen a few come about in the $50,000 range and some edging close to six figures.

-Paul