1990 BMW 750iL

The late 80s and early 90s was a great time to be a fan of German cars, as each manufacturer advanced in leaps and bounds. Volkswagen had the succession of 16V, supercharged, and then VR6 engines. Porsche launched the supercar 959 and beefed up the 911, 944 Turbo and then 968, and the 928 GTS. Mercedes-Benz had the audacity to replace the stalwart R107 with the R129, launched the W124, W201, and finally the W140 and generally remained the benchmark of the world. Audi’s success with the Quattro proliferated the model range, and the company that dared to be different ended the 80s with the wild quad-cam all-wheel drive V8 quattro and introduced the S and RS model ranges in the 90s.

BMW was not to be outdone. While the M brand had its roots in the 70s, it was really the 80s where they stretched their legs; the introduction of the definitive sports sedan and coupes of the M3, M5, and M6 still have repercussions today. But they weren’t about to let the go-to W126 and the upstart V8 quattro have all the large-executive limelight. The E23 had been an interesting alternative all along, and it was quite advanced in many ways. But it was its successor, the E32, that really took BMW to the world stage in the large executive market. And the top-tier model was nothing to sneeze at. Gone was turbo power, and in its place BMW sistered two of their M20 inline-sixes together on a common crank, creating the M70 – a 5.0-liter V12 with an aluminum block and the best part of 300 horsepower. This was 1987, mind you, and that was still a pretty big number. Complex, expensive, and not without fault, the 750iL generated a lot of headlines and more than a few headaches for the other brands and its owners. Finding a clean one today can be tough, but this one with some period Racing Dynamics mods looks swell:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 BMW 750iL on eBay

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1997 Mercedes-Benz CL600

As the years go on, the W140 Mercedes-Benz coupe is looking more and more appealing to me. The European version, at least. I say that half joking, but it is true. Why? Some very small changes that seem to make all the difference to me. Slightly shorter bumpers and different 18″ wheels as we see here, along with amazing colors like Viola Metallic. As luck would have it, that is what we have with this 1997 CL600 for sale up in Stuttgart, Germany.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Mercedes-Benz CL600 at Bob Forstner

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2004 Maybach 62

Oh Maybach, how far will you fall? Normally when screaming about depreciation, its the Maybach 57, not the king of the hill 62 like we have here today. Just to refresh, the 62 was the extra-long wheel base version that measures 20-feet-long (!) that allowed rear passengers lay completely flat. It rang in at $360,000 … in 2004. Just to put that into perspective, the 2004 Rolls-Royce Phantom was only $320,000. This car was unbelievably expensive and its hard to argue it was worth it when you see it now and take a close look at it. That also probably explains why it is so cheap now.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Maybach 62 on eBay

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2004 Mercedes-Benz S600

Fresh off last week’s 2018 Mercedes-Benz G65 AMG, I thought I’d look at one of the first vehicles equipped with the M275 engine, the W220 S600. This engine replaced the god awful M158 V12 that lasted a few short years and was by far the better engine for the job. It was so good, they literally put it in almost every vehicle in their range for the next 15 years, including that G65 that I just mentioned. You would think an old twin-turbocharged V12 would be nothing but trouble, but they are fairly easy to live with as long as you remember it is an old twin-turbocharged V12.

This 2004 S600 up for sale in Texas comes in with just a little over 32,000 miles and seems to be in top shape. Admittedly, it isn’t the most attractive car ever in terms of looks and of course the tech is a bit dated, but for the price, is it worth look?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Mercedes-Benz S600 on eBay

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2018 Mercedes-Benz G65 AMG

As we near end days for gasoline-powered vehicles, I think we are going to look back at the first 20 years of the new millennium and say to ourselves, “They put what in what?!” Even in the days of $4.00 a gallon for fuel, V12-powered vehicles were in no short supply. All the German marques, with the exception of Porsche, had 12 cylinder vehicles in their line-up and most of them were equipped with a pair of turbochargers. The big sedans and coupes? Sure that makes sense. A lumbering hulk of a SUV that has been in its same body since 1991? Come again?

Somehow, someway, AMG figured out a way to squeeze the M275 twin-turbo V12 into the G65 and boy did it not disappoint. Despite weighing over 6,300 pounds, a G65 AMG would get to 60mph in 5 seconds. That is scary. Even scarier? The price tag. These started at $215,000. Just to compare, the little brother G63 AMG was $150,000. Was the extra four cylinders worth another $75,000? I mean, if you play in the league of six-figure SUVs, why not?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2018 Mercedes-Benz G65 AMG on eBay

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427-Mile 2001 Mercedes-Benz SL600

These ultra-low mileage cars that come out of the woodwork every so often can either can one of two ways. On one hand, they are stashed away with care and caution. Regular exercise, maintenance, and cleaning when necessary. On the other side, basically none of that. Just throw it in the corner under a cover and let it sit. Then bring it out and say it is perfect. That might be true in a loose definition, but not when it comes to really caring for the car. Today’s car, a 2001 Mercedes-Benz SL600 for 427 miles, maybe is on the latter of those scenarios.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Mercedes-Benz SL600 at Mercedes-Benz Classic All Time Stars

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1993 Mercedes-Benz 600SEL

Last week I looked at a really exceptional 1997 Mercedes-Benz S500 that looks to have found a new owner at right under $15,000. Probably a fair price for both parties, and I doubt it will lose much as long as the condition stays close to what it is now. Naturally, that got me looking around at other W140s, and wouldn’t you a 1993 600SEL popped up finished in the rare Nautical Blue Metallic. Granted, any color on a W140 that isn’t black, silver, or white is rare, but this one really seems to pop. Match that with the Palomino interior, and this one is well into “classic” status.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Mercedes-Benz 600SEL on eBay

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2007 Mercedes-Benz S600

In terms of depreciation of the W221 Mercedes-Benz S-Class, we are probably near the bottom. A little bit of a double-edged sword as prices are well in to affordable range, but that means they are also getting into the hands of those who maybe aren’t staying up on the maintenance. On today’s car, a 2007 S600, maintenance is a way of life. Believe it or not, a twin-turbo V12 from 14 years ago isn’t the nightmare fuel you’d guess it to be. Outside of a few small things, Mercedes really did an outstanding job making these V12 durable in terms of what disasters V12 in general can become. However, this isn’t all roses. We are talking about large sums of money to drive a 14 year-ago car that probably isn’t impressing anyone outside of a handful of people and of course, me.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Mercedes-Benz S600 on eBay

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1994 BMW 850CSi

I have a romantic vision that there will be some day that I’m able to go for a cruise on the weekend with my family in the fast GT car. Part of that stems from a childhood dream; my grandfather was lucky enough to own a Ferrari 250GT/L Lusso back in the 1960s and 1970s; it was long gone before I was any age to appreciate it, but I’ve always had a thought that I could buy one some day. Well, recent market changes have moved the Lusso from a $100,000 Ferrari to a $1,000,000 plus Ferrari – the chances of me ever buying one have gone from slim to none. Even the replacement models like the 365GTC/4 are also firmly out of reach too. So my dream of the classic Ferrari has moved on to more recent, affordable models. The 456GT is a great example – classic looks, perfect layout, and most reasonable examples can be had between $50,000 and $60,000. Great! The problem? Well, it’s still a Ferrari; frequent belt services seem to run between $6,000 and $10,000, the windows apparently fall out of place and are $1,000 to fix (if you can find and independent who can be trusted), even the brakes are multi-thousand dollars. What’s a reasonable option then? Well, I think the 850CSi is probably one of the best reasonable Ferrari replacements. But is it less money?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW 850CSi on eBay

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1991 Mercedes-Benz 600SEL

Don’t look now, but it seems like the Mercedes-Benz W140 chassis is finally getting its due. Does that mean go out and buy every Craigslist W140 you can find like people do with the 2.3-16v and W124 500Es? No. Please don’t do that. What I’m trying to say is that the very best of the best W140s are finally selling for prices that I would consider “premium”. Just as an example, a 1996 S600 Coupe with 36,000 sold for $32,500 last week and it looked every bit the part of a new car. The sedan is no different either, although the V12 cars and Grand Edition certainly seem to be the most desirable, and rightfully so. Today, I came across a 1991 600SEL up for sale in Germany with just 15,000 miles. Naturally the car perfect, but this one has a little surprise once you open the doors.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Mercedes-Benz 600SEL at Janzen Klassik

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