1987 Porsche 959

The Porsche 959 was one of the most legendary vehicles from the 1980s, if not the past century. Born out of the homologation rules of Group B rallying, the 959 enjoyed a four year production run and paved the way for future all wheel drive 911 models. The 959 was also steeped in controversy, as many folks tried, unsuccessfully to import them to the U.S., including Microsoft founder Bill Gates. Canepa Design eventually developed a modification package that included a reworked turbo, engine management system and exhaust, allowing the 959 to be road legal.

There is no telling whether this particular 959 is one of those U.S. legal examples, but these come up for sale too seldom, making it worth the feature.

The seller states:

1987 Porsche 959 supercar.

This is a rare one owner collectible, imported directly from Germany 1988 and kept in a private collection till now.

All service up to 5600 miles done by Stuttgurt Porsche factory, and it has only 7,800 miles. The paint still looks new and the interior is like a new car condition, a beatiful black leather.

This car comes with all books and tools from factory. Once it was over $1 million and it could go back sometime ……..it certainly a rare jewelry for a real Porsche enthusiast to own.

In total, there were 337 959s ever built, and prices reflect their rarity, accordingly. They are still relatively young in terms of a classic car and values seem to be all over the map. Originally costing $225,000 when new, Bonhams sold one for $204,000 back in 2004, and reports have it that Jerry Seinfeld had bought one for $700,000. The asking price of $375,000 seems to be right around the midpoint of the few I spotted for sale online recently.

In case you missed it, Top Gear recently featured the 959 alongside its contemporary, the Ferrari F40, in their last season:

-Paul

No-reserve 1974 Porsche 911 for sale in honor of our “barn find”

My best friend lives in Washington now, having departed California about a year ago to return to our childhood home. His parents still live there, and we have long dreamed of commandeering their underused German treasures: a 1987 VW Westfalia, and the S-ified version subject of today’s 1974 Porsche 911. The Westy is in pretty good shape, but unfortunately the white 911S has been woefully neglected in the garage, its 30k-mile rebuild going unappreciated and the body wilting with rust. It has now been bequeathed to said friend though, and as funds allow, a rejuvenation is planned.

The mid-year 911s are not as desirable as the 69-73s with their crash bumpers and impending emissions-choking equipment, though the latter was thankfully postponed until the 1975 model year. Porsche integrated the bumpers better than most, and the new 2.7L flat-6 put out 150hp normally and 173hp in S trim – enabling the 2300 lb car to be quick even by today’s standards (GTI quick, mind you- not 911 quick). So, these ’74s may not be the ultimate collector’s wet dream, but they’re good enough for me, having pulled me from my Audis and BMWs and leaving me chomping at the bit for my first 911 experience. Today from eBay we have a beautifully clean, 60k mile 911, and I’m getting excited.

The seller has written some nice history and details, but it’s best summed up by this:

This early edition 2.7-liter Porsche 911, unencumbered by power-sapping emissions systems, featuring a rust free pan and a most striking color combination, must be one of the best values to be found in the vintage Porsche marketplace today.

The no-reserve auction is just over $10k at time of writing with a week left. I’m not experienced enough with the sensitive subject of vintage 911 pricing to make a true estimate, but the price could go up quite a bit and I’d still consider this a fun and relatively inexpensive entry into the car, the myth, the legend that is 911.

I’m ready to visit home and start wrenching.

-NR

Lust-worthy CLK63 AMG Black Series for sale

No massive back story here, it’s pretty simple: my european car came today featuring a modified CLK63 AMG Black Series and I can’t get it off my mind. I re-watched the unrivaled Top Gear segment and had to live the dream the only way I can: eBay ads. It’s simplicity, audacity, and brutality make it perhaps the most lust-worthy post-1980s car I can think of. I want it, and I want to rage in it.

So how to rationalize this dark fantasy? Well, I certainly can’t in my current paygrade, but if I were in the position to spend $70k or more on a sports car, I would overlook the newer M3, the RS5, R8, CTS-V, GTR, the myriad 911s, etc. etc. as they are positively weaksauce compared to this… this is the kind of unique, raw, incredible German machine that I would choose. It’s badass in a way the Aston Martin Vantage V8 only wishes it could be. All 18,600 of glorious driving miles are at around $50k at time of writing with 4 days left; other buy-it-nows range from $75-90k. I’d give organs to have this car in the garage.

-NR

1986 Porsche 928

We haven’t featured a good, clean 928 in a while, so here you go. I have to admit, I was a bigger fan of the later 928s with their smoother styling, but with a 5 speed manual and a classy color combination, this earlier 928 is rather attractive to me. Incidentally, this 928 features the later 5.0 liter V8, debuting in 1985.

1986 Porsche 928s
5 speed Manual- very rare- Not many manual transmission 928’s around!!
8 cylinder 4C 32 valve motor.

exterior color: Blue
interior color: blue with cream/white leather seats
very special and stand out color combination!

Options:
6 way power seats
aftermarket cd player, detachable face.
included is the stock radio(not in car)
4 sets of keys
original porsche wheel locks(black) *not on car

Maintenance: All service up to date
Brand New tires- all 4- Continental Extreme Contact DW 225-50R 16

Condition: As you can see from all the pictures this car is in great condition, cosmetically and mechanically. This car as always been a weekend car, this is obvious from the small amount of miles it has!!

928s usually seem to fall into two categories, either pristine or ones that are clapped out. This example obviously falls into the former category. After witnessing a colleague go through hell who bought a 928 that was run hard and put up wet, well, you don’t want to take a chance on cars with a questionable history and certainly not when it’s one of these.

-Paul

1981 Mercedes 380SEL Koenig Specials Widebody

Coming out of a Florida estate sale is this nice looking Koenig Special. The car has a bit over 100,000 miles on the 3.8 liter V8. The seller doesn’t come off as an expert on Mercedes vehicles, but does provide what sounds like an honest and fair description of the car in a video overview posted within the ad.

The paint is showing some expected wear, but in general the widebody kit and the interior look very good for a car like this. Those of you who follow the big Benzs with the “Miami Vice” style kits of this era know that most that come to market these days have many cracks, dings, chips, and defects. This one looks fine as is; a new owner could make it exceptional with a strip and high quality respray. Other than this being based on the lower output 3.8 instead of the 5.0 or 5.6, this one appears to be a good candidate for preservation. The 3.8 does make this a bit more uncommon in terms of other Koenig models. The car is a Euro model and was imported through proper channels, it has the correct importer markings.

The seller makes a mention of this car having a twin timing chain setup, which is nothing special, but a common conversion on the 3.8 as a preventative maintenance measure. Outside of the paint problems, its missing part of the climate control system, the speedo doesn’t work, there is a modern radio (good or bad depending on your purist intentions a period correct Alpine unit would look great), and lastly for some unknown reason the gold trunk Mercedes emblem has been replaced upside done.

The ask is $8,500 with bidding up at a reserve not met $6,200. Lots of depreciation on a car that cost over $100k when new. Even with the flaws and the less exciting engine, I have a real soft spot for these cars and the presence they command out on the road.

~Evan

1965 Mercedes-Benz 220Sb

Mercedes-Benz was never one to give into styling fads until the last decade or so. However, the craze for tailfins in the 1950s led the styling team of the Stuttgart firm to introduce the fintail, or Heckflosse in German. These sedans were a restrained, German interpretation of a popular styling element that would last well past the tail fin craze left the US. The last Heckflosse left the factory in January 1968. Here is a clean, dual carburetor 220Sb outside of Washington, D.C. for sale.

The seller states:

1965 Mercedes Benz 220SB, 6 cylinder engine, automatic transmission. Always garaged, second owner. Original paint, great condition, compression is good, new stock transmission, all new brake lines, Original miles. Have maintenance records dating back 10 years, original books and man

While at the Mercedes-Benz Club June Jamboree in 2006, I remember running into a non-fintail 250S sedan in a similar gray on red color combination. I simply love the contrast of these period correct hues.

Incidentally, a few years before I came along, my father drove a 1967 230S, which was the final evolution of the Heckflosse, with a revised 2.3 liter, twin carb M108 six cylinder. It was black over parchment, with a 4 speed manual on the floor. We still have plenty of pictures of this car, one of which I sent to Mercedes-Benz for use in their ad campaign a few years ago “No One Ever Poses With Their Toaster.” You can see my father and his friends similar ’67 230S in white at 0:30 in the following video:

-Paul

Italian Audi Insanity

One of our readers from Italy was kind enough to call attention to a trio of astonishing Audi Quattros for sale online in Italy. We’ve posted some pretty nice Quattros in the past, but these three turn the four-ringed insanity to 11.

First, we have an Audi Quattro Treser hardtop convertible. “A what!?” you say? I know… though I featured a Treser coupe a while back, I had not seen Treser’s convertible creation before. The coupe’s standard hardtop was absolutely mundane compared to the folding weirdness of this Quattro. Walter Treser was the head of development for the UrQuattro and went on to create his own aftermarket Audi business; the success of the parts business allowed him to get even more creative with things like this pre-Benz SLK convertible hardtop. An elegant convertible with the top down, things get a bit weirder when you push the Autobot button… it kind of looks like a Subaru Brat with a tonneau cover. Funky styling aside, I can’t argue with the rarity and inherent coolness in having a coachbuilt UrQuattro. I can argue that there are better places to spend ~$65k though…

1984 Audi Quattro Treser Convertible for sale on automobile.it

We’ll turn the needle up closer to 11 with this next Quattro, another Treser, and a cabriolet at that; but why not throw in a massive widebody kit and some Testerossa-style side strakes for good measure? Instead of a brat, this looks like a stepside truck. With the same funky 2+2 top up, 2-seater top down system, you can bring the family along, as well as hide them when it gets nice out and you need some Italian bird to notice your Ferraudi. Luckily the 2.1 I5 has been brought up to spec too, pumping out 340hp over only 25k km. 78 grand for some truly rare strange.

1985 Widebody Treser Convertible Audi Quattro for sale on automobile.it

Here’s where I say the amp went past 11 and got all Marty-in-Doc’s-Garage on me, a perfect red Sport Quattro, 1,050km (652 miles!) on a 220-hp S2 swap. While cool, the Tresers seem cut out for a specific kind of drug dealer, whereas the only thing the Sport Quattro is addicted to is winning. Decipher the German/Italian ad if you can; something about the Sport’s trick Kevlar roof and some other mild mods. The only way this car could kill it any harder would be if Hans Dahlback himself had modified it. 220hp should be plenty of fun, but the S2 can easily attain much more. Lively on that tiny wheelbase, the pitbull of the Quattro family.

1985 Audi Sport Quattro for sale on automobile.it

The range of $65-$80k for these things makes me think either a) These are even rarer in the rest of the world than I realized or b) cars are extremely expensive in Italy due to taxes and whatnot. I’m guessing it’s a mixture of both. Regardless, three very cool and unique takes on the UrQuattro (though I could only drive the red one).

-NR

1993 Porsche 968 Cabriolet

With everyone pouring over ridiculous Cayennes and Panameras these days (yeah, I just went there), we all forget about the simpler times at Porsche. This was a lineup filled with 911s and magnificently balanced front engined GTs. Here’s a really clean, two owner 968 cabriolet. And thankfully, it has three pedals.

The seller states:

Very nice 2 owner car. Only 60K miles, 6 speed, new clutch, Service are up to date, power top in excellent condition, Silver blue with gray leather and blue top.CD , Cold AC, climate control, Runs and drives excellent. Clean title, no dings and dents, carfax certified. Non smoker. Good tires. Good brakes.

I could think of a lot worse ways to spend $14,900. This car got me thinking that I could have had a Porsche for the price of my Cooper S. Granted, my Cooper S is newer and has less miles. Nevertheless, with 60,000 miles and a robust 3.0 liter four, this Porsche would be a solid investment and a lot of fun for someone in a more temperate climate. They are one of those early to mid 90s German classics that are becoming a rare sight on the roads today.

-Paul

1986 Mercedes 190E 16v with 2.6 & Evo II Kit

It will be interesting to see what this car will bring. You have a high mileage 190E 2.3 16v that hasn’t seen a lot of use of late, but does have some where north of 189,000 on the clock. The seller says that is when the odometer stopped working. At around 140k the car received the Bekker Imports stroker kit bumping things out to 2.6 liters. The car also added the Evolution II body kit. The massive rear wing has been removed due to owner taste, but he says it is available.
The seller is asking $5,000, which is a fraction of what this would bring if it was a genuine Evo car.
The car needs some work, seller says the paint needs a refresh, that the engine has some “hesitation”, and that the suspension could use some work.
Like I said I’ll be curious to see if anyone bites on this. With the stroker kit, the body kit, and the 19″ AMG wheels with only 4k on the tires, the MSRP on the mods alone would send you well over $5k.

 

~Evan

2005 Mercedes-Benz C55

Beginning in the mid 1990s, the AMG C classes from Mercedes-Benz have proved to be quite popular over the years, with a range of breathed on six-cylinder and V8 models appearing in the lineup. Here we have a clean, two owner, C55 for sale in Pennsylvania.

The seller states:

This auction is for a 2005 Mercedes Benz C55 Sport Sedan. I am the second owner of this vehicle. The vehicle is in immaculate condtion. It has been professionally maintained at a Mercedes Benz dealership since new. It has had all its regular maintence performed (Transmission service, coolant service, brake fluid service, oil changes, etc.). It has brand new rear tires with less than 200 miles on them. Front tires at 50%, front and rear brakes at 50%. The vehicle needs nothing. Runs excellent, looks great. Only reason I am selling is due to the fact I have too many vehicles and its time to get rid of a few. This car is very enjoyable to drive. I will definately miss it!

I sold my 2007 C230 Sport with 27k miles for $20,500 two months ago. Even though this is two years older, prices on the last of the W203 AMGs have finally reached somewhat attainable levels. Anything with 300 or more horsepower in a car this size is a riot to drive. I know this first hand, as I’ve driven several of these over the years. Even considering rising gas prices, a C55 in this kind of condition would be a smart investment in the coming years. I mean, where else were you going to put your money, the stock market?

-Paul