1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

There is a lot going on with the 993 Turbo. As the last of the air-cooled 911 Turbos it will always exist in the rarefied air that enthusiasts reserve for only their most hallowed cars. But, just as Porsche was saying goodbye to one piece of technology it was bringing on board another: the 993 Turbo was the first to receive all-wheel drive as standard, a feature that has remained standard on every Turbo since, with the exception of the ultra-low production GT2. That places these cars in an interesting position and while I feel its status as the last of the air-cooled turbos will ultimately win the day I still wonder (and I’ve said this before) how the market for these and the 964 Turbos will shake out long term. Only time will tell in that regard, though either way I think it’s safe to say that both models will remain highly sought after. The example we see here is a Black 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Arizona, with Red leather interior and only 24,500 miles.

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Tuner Tuesday: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

If yesterday’s Koni Challenge 997 was a little too extreme for your Porsche dreams, you don’t need to look far for another stunning deal. We’ve talked a lot about what an incredible performance package the 996 twin turbo still is; over a decade on, even box stock these are still cars that perform at near exotic levels. Despite that massive performance, they’re available for a relative song – we’ve even seem some higher mileage examples dipping into the $30,000 range. Today’s example has been turned up as many have, now capable of 600 horsepower ripping pavement through all four wheels. That means your trumped-up Beetle can embarrass most Ferraris, Lamborghinis and some small airplanes for only $50,000. It’s so fast, not only the pictures but even the dyno readout is blurry from speed:

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1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe

The poster car: we all had them on our wall when growing up. Rarely subtle, these were cars that stunned you visually and were almost always very fast. At least, that was my wall. The most common poster in the ’80s was probably the Countach, which still today looks insane. The Countach, however, was insane. Porsche’s road-going version of Countach excessiveness was the 930 Slantnose, but because it was based off of the very streetable 911 it lacked much of the insanity of the Countach. The appearance of the 930 itself was hardly subtle and in the guise of the Slantnose all hints of subtlety went out the window. Unsurprisingly, given the iconic nature of the 911’s front end, not everyone is a fan of the Slantnose, but their rarity makes them quite highly prized by collectors. The example here is a Guards Red 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe, located in California, with Tan interior and only 28,115 miles.

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2001 Porsche 911 Turbo

Finding value in the 911 range is always a difficult proposition. Finding a value that also brings with it excellent performance can be darn near impossible. As with most things in life, there is always an exception. The 996TT has been that exception for a while now and even as values for an air-cooled 911 continue to rise, these little loved water-cooled models pretty much stay the same. With more than 400 hp on tap these are very fast cars that will deliver you to your destination with a dose of style and also ferocity and while the all-wheel drive setup provides security against the 911’s tail-wagging nature these cars are still capable of biting back against inattentive drivers. There really are few performance options for the cost of a 996TT on the market these days. The example here is a Black 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Massachusetts, with 55,908 miles on it.

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1987 Porsche 911 Turbo

I really enjoy seeing some of the closer, detail, shots of the 930. The car is instantly recognizable as a 911 and the details then provide us those subtle clues that hint at this being something more than a standard 911. The wider rear arches stretching over the rear wheels. Those distinctive lines of the spoiler that guide air into the intercooler and help differentiate this from the basic whale tail. Just the general slightly muscled and aggressive overall look, which lets everyone know that this is a car that requires respect from its driver but that it also remains a usable and streetable machine. The car we have here is a one-owner Guards Red 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Miami, with only 34,000 miles on it. The seller does not appear to possess much background or documentation of the car’s history, but from what we can see the care the car has received was considerable.

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1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6

Given the relatively short time in which it was around, it is kind of staggering to consider the number of variants produced of the 964. Even looking beyond the many different Carrera 2 and Carrera 4 models there were also 4 different turbos, the Speedster, the Carrera RS America, the Carrera Cup and the America Roadster. Granted, some of these were made in very small numbers, but still we certainly could not accuse Porsche of being complacent during this time! And here we have one of those rarer variants, a 1994 Black Metallic Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6. For the final two model years of the 964 Porsche released a turbocharged version of the standard 3.6 liter flat-six that had been the primary motivation of the rest of the 964 line since its inception. While this wouldn’t be the last 964 Turbo, that would be the 3.6 Turbo S, these are still highly sought after and prized by Porsche enthusiasts as some of the last rear-drive 911 Turbos Porsche produced.

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1992 Porsche 911 Turbo

Upon its release the 911 Turbo was an instant marvel. Here was a car that combined aggressive looks and prodigious power in a package that was actually reasonably practical and usable. The supercar world was turned on its head. Even today those early cars still provide an excellent driving experience and are capable of running with many performance cars. That initial offering saw its only significant change take place in 1978 as displacement increased from 3.0 to 3.3 liters, but for the remaining 12 years of its life the 930 simply continued to excel with a tried and true formula. Even when the 964 Turbo was released it still used the same engine that Porsche had utilized since 1978, except now that engine was improved and the car came in a more refined package. Still, the 964 Turbo was a brute and with all of that power being delivered to the rear of a car already having a rearward weight distribution it made for very exciting driving! As we continue to see prices rise for air-cooled 911s, and the Turbo especially, it becomes increasingly unlikely that these will be seen outside of someone’s garage, but we can still marvel at them from a distance. The example we see here is a Black 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Illinois, with 59,530 miles on it.

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1992 Porsche 911 Turbo

If Thursday’s 3.6 Turbo S has you thinking about the 964 Turbo, but perhaps not one sitting at the very top of the market, then the car here may suit your needs a little bit better. Here we have an example from the first iteration of these cars that utilized a refined version of the 930’s well-known 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-six. While the 3.3 liter 964 Turbo doesn’t have quite the power of the later 3.6 Turbo, it relies on a proven powertrain that still delivers exceptional performance capable of providing plenty of wild rides for any driver whose attention wanes at the wrong moment. While the Carrera 4 first was introduced with the 964, the 964 Turbo itself remained rear-wheel drive only. The example here is a Guards Red over Black 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Ohio, with only 36,630 miles on it.

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1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S ‘Package Car’

The Holy Grail. Indiana Jones found it and lost it; Arthur and his knights were thwarted by the French and arrested by British police. It is the thing we all search for, but is a constantly shifting and elusive form. For automotive enthusiasts there are numerous possibilities, but for fans of the 911 Turbo this is the model about which most will speak. The 964 Turbo could never be pinned down. Because a turbocharged version of the M64 initially wasn’t ready the earliest cars used the 3.3 liter flat-six from the 930. Then in 1992, as a final send-off for that 3.3 liter engine, a Turbo S was produced prior to the introduction of the proper 3.6 liter Turbo. But even this would not be the last model, because in 1994 Porsche took all of the remaining 964 Turbo chassis, some 93 cars, and created the 3.6 liter Turbo S. Most of those were also optioned as a Flatnose, but there were two variants that remain some of the rarest 911 models ever produced. The Japanese market received 10 examples, all painted Polar Silver Metallic, fitted with the 935-derived Slantnose, made popular on the 930, rather than the 968-derived Flatnose of the Turbo S cars. And then there is the model we see here: only offered in the US market there were 17 ‘Package’ cars, which had all of the standard Turbo S options EXCEPT the Flatnose. The front end was mostly akin to any other 964 Turbo. 17 were produced, 10 in Black, 2 with Black over Cashmere leather, 1 of those was an exhibition vehicle. All of which leaves this car as a 1 of 1.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S ‘Package Car’ at Sloan Cars

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1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose

A Black Slantnose 930: the poster boy of ’80s flamboyance and excess. There are a lot of things I love about these cars. Derived from the Porsche 935 racer, the Slantnose came along as an option for the 930 coupe. Gone were the iconic front headlamps so familiar to fans of the 911, replaced by a sloping front end with pop-up lights. While the shape might be aerodynamically sensible, porschephiles remain divided on the Slantnose’s appeal, but it is undeniable that the unique shape is one that can be taken in for quite some time. A 930 itself would rarely be a car for those who are faint of heart and a Slantnose 930 turns the attention-getting dial well upward. The particular example featured here comes from the 1987 model year and sits with just 38,800 miles.

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