1997 Porsche 911 C4S

I have always been a huge fan of the classic 911. From certain angles and in certain colors they possess a combination of beauty and aggression that makes me forget they’re 30-year-old cars. Then I come across a 993, especially one of the Carrera S variants with their wider rear arches, and my perspective is completely shifted. Suddenly the classic 911 shows its age when compared with the delicate curves of the 993. In the end, both are fantastic designs and with the air-cooled 911 market continuing to show strength, either model should provide great return on investment. The car we have featured here is an Arctic Silver 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe, located in California, with only 39,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

Feature Listing: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

With air cooled 911 prices always on the rise, it seems that enthusiasts are more fearful than ever than to modify their precious sports cars. However, there are still a few adventurous owners out there willing to give their 911 their own personal touch and improve upon the standard formula. Such is the case with the follow mid 1970s 911 coming to us from our reader Nate, looking sharp in RS livery.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

1975 Porsche 911 Carrera

I’ve developed a much stronger interest in these cars lately. Not because of any particular affection I feel for the 1974-1977 model 911 itself, but simply because these cars remain somewhat low on the price scale, especially considering their age. They aren’t the best performers and have been known to have engine issues, but I’m curious where the market for them is headed and what sorts of options we come across in terms of the condition of the cars. There were two models produced for the US market during these years (the 911 and 911S), primarily distinguished by a 25 horsepower bump (up to 175 hp) in the 911S, and these cars were distinguished from their predecessors by being the first models to have the new impact bumpers. The example featured here is a Light Yellow 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera, located in Illinois, that has seen 117,500 miles.

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1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

As the air-cooled 911 market has accelerated it has been nice to see some of the nicer driver-quality cars come up for auction and the example here fits that description quite well. Here we another car in Guards Red, though this time a 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa located in Atlanta. The mileage isn’t too high at 111,500 and this one stands apart from the rest with some very sexy HRE deep dish wheels and custom seat inserts that I’m sure will be a very love/hate addition to this car. Needless to say this is not a Targa that will be prized by collectors, but that means it should be obtainable for a better value. With an engine that should have plenty of life left in it that’s the sort of driver-quality Carrera that we’re looking for!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

1979 Porsche 911SC

For years now the decision facing any buyer interested in experiencing the joy of an air-cooled 911, without breaking the bank, came down to choosing between the 911SC and the 3.2 Carrera. Each model offers a similar experience with the 3.2 priced slightly higher, as we would expect. Overall, however, there were few major differences and both could be had at a good value. As the market for the 3.2 Carrera shifts upward, those decisions may now be made much easier if, and it’s a big if, the market for the 911SC remains a much more reasonable value. At the very least I expect prices for the 911SC to lag slightly behind and there should still be good values remaining for driver-quality examples such as this Guards Red 1979 Porsche 911SC, located in Massachusetts, that has seen 88,497 miles. The question anyone in the market for one must grapple with is how long can you wait? The time to get one may be now.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 911SC on eBay

Original Owner 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

When my mother went to buy her first car, she had her sights set on a Volkswagen Karmann Ghia. Ever the practical man, my grandfather told her she shouldn’t be buying something without a backseat. He steered her towards buying a 1972 Super Beetle instead, even if he was a very “buy American” consumer at that point. So a Super Beetle with an Automatic Stick Shift gearbox it was. To this day, every time a Karmann Ghia will pass, my mother always mentions how much she wanted one, but at this point, it’s unrealistic she’ll probably try her hand at ownership. This 1973 Karmann Ghia for sale by The Gallery Brummen in The Netherlands is an amazing survivor with original paint sourced from an owner in Switzerland.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia at the Gallery Brummen

1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

There is something to be said for a great interior in any car, but especially in a convertible. With the top down and the sun shining every little detail tends to stand out not only for the world to see but even for you as the driver. The interior is what we see and feel and it is what connects us to the car and provides immediate sensory feedback. A terrible interior can make a great car seem boring, and a great interior livens up even pedestrian models. Thus, it should come as little surprise that I really love the interior on this 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet. Other than the steering wheel, I have always loved the layout and look of the classic 911 interior and when presented in this shade of Tobacco leather I find that everything fits together perfectly, especially on a car in a shade of dark blue like the Marina Blue we see here. The contrast works to make the car seem more alive and driving more enjoyable. As we continue our slog through the variants of the 3.2 Carrera, this Cabriolet with 106K miles provides us another look at this escalating market and the current demand for driver-quality examples.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

We have featured a few 3.2 Carreras for sale lately as the market for these cars rises and owners look to capitalize on interest in the car. Here we have another example that will provide us with an interesting look at where Carreras in various states of condition and mileage are selling. Given some of the sales we’ve seen, this particular Carrera might even be a pretty good value. This Guards Red 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa, for sale in California, comes in the rare combination of red on red and sits at just shy of 80K miles. We’ve seen in the past few weeks this 1989 Carrera Coupe with 57K miles sell for $45,000 and this 1986 Carrera Coupe with 162K miles recently sold for $27,000. So, where might Targa values lie relative to these coupes?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on Excellence Magazine

1973 Porsche 911T

Opportunities for finding a pre-1974 911 for any sort of reasonable amount of money are few and far between and typically requires that we stretch our definition of reasonable to a certain degree. But, when considering 40+ year-old performance icons these sorts of facts shouldn’t surprise us. The model that does still fall well short of a six-figure price tag is the 911T, Porsche’s entry-level 911 produced from 1968-1973. This no frills version of the 911 featured a 2.0 liter flat-six that produced 110 hp when first introduced and served as the gateway to 911 ownership. By the 1973 model year, displacement had increased to 2.4 liters with an appreciable bump in hp as well (140 hp). The T remained throughout its life the most basic model available and, in a sense, was the last time a truly entry-level 911 was produced. The example feature here is an unrestored Leaf Green 1973 Porsche 911T, located in New York.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911T on eBay

1967 Porsche 911S Coupe

In its earliest years Porsche offered a variety of trim levels to suit a wider array of buyers. The 911T, E, and S each fit within their own performance window and provided buyers more opportunities to get into the 911 that most appropriately fit their performance needs and budget. For the 1967 model year Porsche introduced the 911S. With 160 hp, along with revised chassis and braking, the 911S offered captivating performance for its time and began to establish the 911 as an iconic sports car. The example featured here has recently undergone a full restoration: a Sand Beige 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in California.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay