1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

Excellence Magazine ran a recent article on the 1969 911S as possibly the best of the early long-hood 911s. There wasn’t really an extensive argument for that claim, but rather it served as a reasonable introduction to the 911 upon which the article was intended to focus. Regardless of whether we feel the ’69 model year was the best, it was important as it was the year Porsche extended the wheelbase across the entire 911 line bringing to these cars greater dynamic stability and, at least to my eye, better looks. As tends to happen, I then came across a nice looking 911S and figured the fates must have aligned for me to feature it. So here we have a Burgundy 1969 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in New York, with a Tan interior and wonderful houndstooth inserts in the seats. It has undergone a full restoration though everything is said to be in its original colors and spec (I assume the steering wheel is not original).

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay

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Year: 1969
Model: 911S
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 2,900 mi
Price: $198,500 Buy It Now

1969 PORSCHE 911S COUPE
–Burgundy with Tan interior with Hound’s-tooth front seat inserts and Beige carpeting, Restored, Numbers Matching, 2.0 liter with mechanical injection, 5-speed “901” gearbox, PCA Parade Class Winner, Original colors and numbers matching, Sunroof, Absolutely superb in every way! VIN: 119300093

Of the total 911 series, the desirable ”S” coupes were revered for their exhilarating driving character, quality, engineering and iconic styling, are among the most collectible 911’s. This 911 S has benefited from a superb, award winning restoration.

Restored by a Southern California Porsche enthusiast and respected PCA judge this restoration was completed in 2008. No stone was left unturned and no expense was spared. Once meticulously detailed and prepared, the 911S was entered in the prestigious PCA Parade Concours d’Elegance at Keystone, Colorado where it was featured in the early 911 Touring class. After the judges has determined a score of 233.2 out of a possible 235 points, this car was awarded first in Class, an impressive feat in one of the most competitive Porsche shows in the country. It is also important to note that only .01 of a point was deducted for issues of authenticity.

Every hour and dollars spent on the two-year undertaking is documented in seven pages of spreadsheets and through the collection of photographs that illustrate the various steps from start to finish.

Since restoration, this 911 S has accumulated only 3,000 miles of careful, collector owned used and has been cared for properly and regardless of use. Although completed in 2008, the 911’s current condition is a testament to the restoration, it is still in absolutely superb condition and welcome on any concours lawn.

It is offered with tool kit, jack, owner and radio manuals and a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. We welcome inspections, you will be hard pressed to find another in this exceptional condition.

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Given their top-of-the-line status we don’t see a good 911S all that often and when we do it’s always worth taking the time to appreciate these cars. They are quite expensive though. As that top sporting model from Porsche this one walks an interesting line between performance car and refined cruiser. The colors definitely fall along the more elegant side of the spectrum; this isn’t one of the brilliant and flashy pastels that are so prized from this period. The Burgundy paint is complemented well by subtle gold accents and the interior is just fantastic. It’d be great if this one had sports seats because the houndstooth inserts look particularly good on their sleeker lines, but perhaps the more plush seats are intended to keep it aligned with the refined part of the scale. Either way I imagine the combination will have much appeal though for collectors I do think the pastels ultimately garner more attention and money. At nearly $200K the asking price probably will have to come down a bit, but it is a very nice looking example and I’m sure someone will gladly add it to an early-911 collection.

-Rob

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3 Comments

  1. I’m originally from the area, and I can vouch for the reputation of this seller. From PPIs for exotics to the work done in-house, you pay top dollar for Tom and his crew, but I have yet to hear anything but praise for the product you get. They actually stockpile things you’d expect factory restoration departments at exotic manufactures to maintain – like 1950s and 1960s Ferrari and Aston cylinder heads. I understand that they have also been the factory reps for Aston Martin Works Service in the U.S., and they are authorized to offer factory warranties on the work they perform (e.g., Gen-1 Vanquish 6-speed conversions). This is a longstanding vintage and exotic specialist in the business for the long haul, and it’s exactly the kind of place you’d want to shop for an investment-grade car like this 911.
    Best,
    Tim Mosso

  2. I just thought I would share a few thoughts on this car since I was the one who first sold it for the owner that built the car. The car was not restored in Southern California. It was restored by Tom Scott in Colorado. Tom’s probably forgotten more about 356’s than I could possibly learn. He thought he would take a stab at a 911 restoration and after this one, he told me several times, he would most likely not do another one again.

    He originally built the car himself and wasn’t so hung about about model year, color, options, etc. A very well respected specialist guided him a bit on the restoration but also explained to him the decisions he was making would hurt the value. Although I love ’69 911s (note, it is Chad McQueen and Nicolas Hunziker’s favorite year), from the collector perspective they are a bit of a red headed stepchild (no pun intended). When you learn about these cars, you realize that they were the foundation of the ’73 RS and many LeMans/race motors. The 2.0L Mag case S has the highest compression of any early 911 motor. They are a race bred motor.

    Tom found the car in Arizona and it had some significant damage on the roof where the passenger A pillar connects (looked like someone dropped something on it). He decided at that point, since it was for him, he would install a factory sunroof. Of course, he did an amazing job and it is nearly impossible to tell. He used a complete NOS factory roof clip from a 1974 and also found all the original wiring, switch, etc. He even was able to recreate the exact proper drain holes. Also, the pepita inserts were not original to the car but a great upgrade IMO.

    We were trying to sell the car in April of 2010 for around 80k…no takers. I disclosed from the get go about the sunroof issue and it freaked the crap out of everyone. Ultimately, they sold it to a dealer for much less who then took it to Scottsdale auction. Long story longer, the car changed hands several times and it seemed like everyone “forgot” to disclose the sunroof and made it like it was original. It wasn’t until the next buyer got it and ultimately called me. Hopefully, this dealer discloses this issue to future buyers as it will save them a lot of headache (and lawsuits) down the road. They are welcome to contact me directly with all the details.

    Cheers,

    Paul

  3. Paul and Tim,

    Thanks for your insights on both the current seller as well as this car. I’m sure anyone who might be looking at it further will appreciate these details.

    Rob

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