1987 Porsche 924S

Please join me in giving a warm welcome to our newest contributor (and longtime reader) at German Cars For Sale Blog, Carter Johnson.

-Paul

Often overlooked by both people who own Porsches and people who want to own Porsches, the 924S remains a bit of a hidden gem. Even people “in the know” often dismiss the 924S as nothing more than a budget offering undeserving of the Porsche name. However, if you could get past the dashboard which carried over from the earlier Audi-engine model of the late 1970s, the 1987 924S was quite the performance bargain. Underneath, it was infused with 944 DNA in the form of engine, suspension and brakes, and while the exterior remained understated and lacked the sexy flares of its 944 and 944 turbo brethren, the 924S was actually quicker to 60 and top speed than the 944, and due to a slightly more slippery exterior, returned better fuel economy as well. As most were under-appreciated, values fell quickly and most were abused – thankfully this is not the case with this low mileage Guards Red 1987.

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Year: 1987
Model: 924S
Engine: 2.4 liter inline-4
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
Mileage: 50,700 mi
Price: $12,900 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 924S on eBay

1987 Porsche 924S. One owner since new! Gorgeous Guards Red with Porsche logo black interior! 50,700 original miles! Original factory manuals! Full service records from new! Factory removable sunroof! Automatic transmission! Like new inside and out! Possibly the finest, most well documented 924S in existence!

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This car appears to be setting the market for a pristine example. There are two ways to look at the steep “Buy it Now” price – $12,900 is a tremendous amount for a 924S, or $12,900 is a bargain for a pristine classic Porsche. While $13,000 may get you past 944 Turbo entry and even brush a bargain 968 price, it’s unlikely that you could find a example of this quality level of either of those models for anywhere near that amount. While $10,000 might be a more realistic price, it’s just about impossible to find a 924S in this condition and you certainly couldn’t replicate it for the asking price. The only downside for most enthusiasts is the automatic transmission. Still, since it’s not an ultra-low mileage museum piece, this is a classic car that could be driven to events and enjoyed on weekends for many years to come. Better yet, you’d be driving a red Porsche without breaking the bank on maintenance or restoration. Twenty six years later, perhaps the promise of the entry level Porsche has finally come true!

-Carter

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10 Comments

  1. I am sure there is a buyer somewhere for that nice looking 924. I just dont think you’ll find one at that price given what you can buy a nicer 944 for these days.

  2. I was excited about this car, until I saw it is being sold by Daniel Schmitt. Take it from a St. Louis native- double up on the due diligence or you WILL get burned. Schmitt’s ad copies are breathtaking masterpieces of hyperbole. He does have some occasional good stuff, but he typically deals in cosmetically pleasing basket cases. And no, he will not “make it right” once your check clears. Do a Google search for the (urinating) contest he got into with the Rennlist forum a few years ago.

  3. Non-starter with an automatic. Any of the aerodynamic benefits are lost.

  4. Well done Carter!

    This car is missing the 3rd pedal but it would make for a great autobahn cruiser.
    I am a sucker for nice low mileage cars, especially ones with great driving dynamics.

    Most people that are looking at buying a Porsche understand the brand.
    This probably won’t float their boat and I would expect quite a price discount will be required to close a sale.

  5. It would make a poor autobahn car. You would not survive in the left lane in this car. Its slow by todays standards, dead slow. It was not much to begin with, nothing more than a wannabee Porsche made from the long discarded parts bin.

    As far as the dealer goes… if you’re a buyer make sure you do all of your homework, it does not matter who the seller is. If you buy a car like this or any other classic or older sports car and you dont get a PPI its on you.

  6. Howard, thanks for your input. The 1978 you linked to is sure a pretty car, but the early 2.0 and the later 2.5 have very different driving dynamics, so I’m not sure it’s really comparing apples to apples. Still, it’s a valid argument that the seller is asking too much for this car. Regarding the 3 speed Auto, it’s not as bad as you would think. I had the same transmission in a 1986 Audi GT, and while it lacked a bit off the line, on the go it wasn’t too bad at all. Having driven on the autobahn, this car would do just fine, since you’re not allowed to cruise in the left lane anyway and most areas are regulated. Check for an update later this week on a car you may be more interested in! Thanks, Carter

  7. You’re right its probably not as good a data point as I first thought. Either way that red one is grossly over priced. I have spent months and months in Germany and driven thousands oof KM’s on the autobahn. You wouldnot be running with the big dogs or even the puppies in that thing.

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