1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

The 964 iteration of the Porsche 911 fell into a bit of a no-man’s land in terms of collectability for a while but is now gaining a little more of the respect it deserves. This iteration of this venerable sports car had a short run. The first model introduced was the Carrera 4 in 1989, which introduced the notion of an all-wheel drive Carrera to the mainstream. The model range was succeeded a few short years later in 1995 by the much loved 993, the final air-cooled 911. In that short span, there was a good deal of variety in terms of model variants, however. One of the most fearsome was, as usual, the Turbo.

This would be the last rear-wheel drive Turbo that Porsche would unleash. As such, it has started to become a bit of a legend. Introduced in 1990, the 964 Turbo used the same 3.3 liter engine as in the previous Turbos, but was upgraded slightly for better performance, capable of 320 bhp and 332 lb-ft torque. It would not be until 1993 that Porsche would unveil a Turbo based on the new 3.6 liter engine that debuted with the Carrera and Carrera S. The 3.3 Turbo was more common than the 3.6, with 3,660 being built versus 1,500. This 1991 Turbo on offer in California has just shy of 40,000 miles on the clock and comes with a few tasteful performance upgrades.

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Year: 1991
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 39,990 mi
Price: $100,000 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Very rare 1991 965 Turbo with know history from new only 39,990 miles from new meticulously maintained, non-smoker, with no paint work or accidents ever as new and with [EXCELLENT TO LIKE NEW CONDITION WITH PERFECT INTERIOR] originally sold out of Calrsbad San Diego Porsche dealership to a Physician California for $100K USD. I have all books, keys, contracts invoice sale books with dealer stamps and service records from new. This 965 Turbo also as very rare factory order sport seats.

Lots of $$$$ spent and with reiceipts lightweight flywheel and clutch package, with over 430BHP and B&B triflow exhaust system with heaterboxes and high flow cats, limited slip differential, The suspension is Bilstein PSS9 fully adjustable coil over suspension, has been lowered and adjusted, thus handles as if on rails.

This is an very clean and exceptional example of the last real rear wheel drive Turbos, less then 700 copies. Recent SMOG and PASS with extremely low emissions. Absolutly no dissappointment. E-mail for more info or addional pictures. Won’t find a nice example in this condition with this history. All books, maintenance records, original tools, spare, jack, keys and totaling over $30K in upgrades. Serious inquiries only please. Thank you.

Engine:
3.3 liter
K-29S-11-11 Turbocharger originally used on 962 Porsche single turbo race cars will flow over 600 HP
1 bar boost spring
HPV Electromotive’s Direct ignition system {DIS}
Lightened flywheel with cluctch package
B&B Try-flow Headers/ with heat exchangers
European fuel system/K&N filter

Suspension:
Limited slip differential
Billstein PSS9 fully adjustable with coil over suspension

RH Germany 3.6 turbo three-piece wheels (18×8.5″ & 18×11″) Brand new Dunlop 225/40/ZR18 front 265/35/ZR18 rear

Additional factory parts included, with under 17K miles when removed

Factory fuel system

K27 Turbo

Complete distributor system

Some addional exhaust system included

Paint- 9.5
Interior- 9.5
Mechanics- 9.5

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As usual, Porsche 911 Turbos do not come cheap, no matter the year. But the asking price of $100,000 left me scratching my head. A 911 Turbo of this vintage with anywhere between 20,000 to 40,000 miles should run you between $50,000 and $70,000 at the most. Sure, this Turbo has been breathed on a bit to put performance up there with the best of them and the mileage is quite reasonable, but the seller has an uphill battle in reaching for six figures.

-Paul

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5 Comments

  1. I’ve had the huge poster of this car on my wall in 1991 in war torn Yugoslavia thinking I’ll never have one. Now I live in US and I could probably afford one (have lift and working on BMW’s for the last 10 years, but I want to get me a Porsche).

    To me, the 964 represents the everything I wanted in Porsche. Having said that, this seller is adding up the receipts and coming up with this number. We all know it doesn’t work that way.

  2. A fellow instructor friend of mine used to run one of these at the same drivers events I went to. It was so pretty. I would chase him through corners, and I distinctly remember being right on his tail in the downhill at Lime Rock, and watching him rocket away at track out – gaining car lengths every second. Most amazing to me was the surreal glow that was emanating from the driver’s side tail pipe. I asked him about it and he said “Yeah, that cat gets pretty hot when you’re on it” or something similar. It just burned into my retina and I’ll never forget how magical it was. Everyone should have a moment like that.

    Yeah, I want one too.

  3. I get it…the 964 is iconic..and not because of the movie Bad Boys….
    this was the widowmaker….and many have not survived…..but at this number is is tickling around the 911 3.6 variant….granted it would probably have more miles….but for me the Holy Grail of the 964 is the Turbo 3.6
    still this is a stunning car…..would take this over a 997TT any day of the week and twice on Sunday

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  5. I agree with MDriver the 3.6 turbo is the Holy Grail. These cars are not nearly as much of a widow maker as the earlier turbos. I had an 89 RUF modded turbo which was downright scary. My ex wife drove it once and got on the boost with the car pointed the wrong way and ended up in a scary spin. We were fortunate that no one was on the road with us. The 964/5 Chassis is much more refined and although the lag is still there the chassis take a lot of the edge out of it.

    These 3.3 Turbos are great cars just not yet commanding that 6 figure price IMO, key word being “yet”.

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