Press "Enter" to skip to content

Tag: Turbo

2013 Volkswagen Golf R

Following on the heels of the R32 from yesterday, one other issue I personally have with paying big money for a Mk.4 Golf is that you can get a newer, faster, and more practical model for around the same money – or much less. Take, for example, this 2013 Golf R.

In 2012 Volkswagen brought the U.S. the spiritual successor to the Golf Limited – the Mk. 6 Golf R. Gone was the VR6, replaced by the more potent and tunable 2.0T that could now be specified with a manual and all-wheel drive, and importantly in 4-door guise. Did I buy one? Nope, because this German wonder rang in at a shocking $36,000 with options. For a Golf, mind you. But once they started hitting the used market, to me they became more appealing. Unlike the R32, they dropped in price. And they still came in great colors, like today’s Rising Blue Metallic.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Volkswagen Golf R on eBay

1 Comment

1985 Audi Quattro

This slick ’85 Quattro is still available, now with much better photos and an asking price that dropped to $75,000.

For U.S. Quattro fans, ’85 models are a bit special as they held numerous upgrades over the prior models. Like the rest of the Type 85/B2 lineup, those included revisions to the exterior, most notably the slanted grill and color matched spoiler, but also inside a new dashboard and revised seat fabric patterns. Like the ’84s, wheels were 8″ Ronals, and the more reliable fuse box was also carried over with the upgrades.

A few unique colors were offered on the ’85 up models, but since importation ended after one ’86 made it here, all colors are a bit special. Unique too was the headlight treatment, which had chrome aero bezels to match the grill. A total of only 73 of these upgraded 85s (plus the one 86) made it to the U.S., and they’ve pretty much always been the most sought of the scant 664 original Quattros sold here. This particular ’85 comes to market looking minty fresh in what appears to be Tornado Red.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Audi Quattro on eBay

3 Comments

1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

Among the craziness of the used car market in the past two years is what has been happening with the 993 Porsche 911 Turbo models. For a long stretch there, you could grab a nice example for somewhere between $100,000 to $135,000. For that amount I think it was well worth the price of entry. It is an unmistakable design, enough pep and power to keep up with modern exotics, and not a total disaster to own like some of the mid-1990s cars that hail from Italy. Now, in 2002, if you want a nice 993 Turbo…oh boy.

This 1996 up for sale in Tennessee is reportedly a one-owner car finished in the sleek Polar Silver Metallic. It has just over 51,000 miles and a fresh engine-out service that ran almost $28,000. I suppose you could say a $28,000 repair bill was worth it when you see this asking price.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1 Comment

2007 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

I know I’m not exactly throwing out a hot take here, but the 997 generation Porsche 911 Turbo seems to be aging well. It unmistakably looks like a 911 and doesn’t have odd or dated design elements like a certain prior generation. Inside it’s also a perfectly pleasant place to be. Yes, the infotainment system is not great, but as long as you aren’t using it for navigation, it is perfectly serviceable. Performance wise, still really fast with 0-60 runs in the high 3 second range. What isn’t to like? Well, it still is an expensive car both to buy and service, as demonstrated by the 2007 up for sale in North Carolina. I’ve purchased my cars for less than the most recent service bill. Come check it out.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

3 Comments

2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

Hard to believe we are here, or maybe not, but the best of the best 996 Porsche 911 Turbos are transacting for over $100,000. I suppose it was inevitable as rising tides lift all boats, but I didn’t see it coming this fast. Keep in mind I’m talking about the standard 996 Turbo, not the GT2 or GT3, as those are already well into their own categories of crazy growth. Still, would you take this over a classic 930 Turbo? I’m not sure.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

4 Comments

1995 Audi S6 Avant Euro-Spec

This C4 is listed as sold for $12,950 on November 20, 2021.

Back in January (and, again in July!) I took a look at this European-specification 1995 Audi S6 Avant. So why is it back? Well, in July it moved to a different seller, has different photos, and is now a no reserve auction. Strangely, the new photos also appear to be taken in Europe, but the car is claimed to be in Stamford, Connecticut – and the July auction was also supposed to be no reserve, but here’s the car again – and, again, with a slightly different description with some contact information. Each time a bit of new information is disclosed. Scam? Perhaps, but if you’re interested maybe it’s worth a call.

Original text from January 2021:

It used to be a bit unusual to see 90s-era European-specification cars come this way. But with the advent of the internet and 25-year-old cars being relatively cheap in other areas of the world, coupled with a current soaring market in the US and nostalgia for easier (they weren’t, but it’s okay to think they were) times, it’s less unusual to see Euro-only models for sale stateside. That’s not the case today; this S6 Avant was available here in nearly identical spec. However, there are a few things interesting on this one and it’s worth taking a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi S6 Avant Euro-Spec on eBay

6 Comments

1995.5 Audi S6 Avant

Defying the odds and most aspects of common sense, a group of fans out there still loves, maintains, and drives Audis from the 1980s and 1990s. Why is this so outrageous? Well, first off, there just aren’t many left. Audi never really broke many sales records here in the US. When we look at this car’s model year, Audi sold about 18,000 cars in total – helped in no small margin by the early launch of the A4. Between 1991 and 1994, Audi averaged only about 13,000 cars per a year. To give us some perspective on that, let’s look at Ford’s F-Series trucks. Even in the midst of pandemics, global parts and labor shortages, and inflation, Ford has managed to move between 45,000 and 84,000 F-Series trucks from showrooms each month of 2021. But that’s the Ford truck, you say, not a luxury car. Fair enough. Let’s look at the least popular Volkswagen on offer – the Passat sedan. Volkswagen is on track to sell more of those here this year than Audi sold total cars in 1995, and they’ve already outsold the ’91-94 years by a safe margin with two months to go.

The secondary part of the problem is Audi’s insistence that we don’t need parts for our 25+ year old cars. It’s not that Audi doesn’t make said parts – they do, and sell them through Audi Tradition. And judging by their recent partnership with Ken Block, Audi’s interested in showing off its historical cars here in America. But they refuse to sell you parts to fix them.

This means, of course, that enthusiasts are left to fend for themselves, creating groups of faithful fans that buy, trade, and sell parts amongst themselves, tricks and tips, and…of course…really good examples for sale that pop up. So let’s dive in to this late-production Magnolia S6 Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995.5 Audi S6 Avant on Quattroworld

2 Comments

2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe

For my personal cars, I like them as unique and as special as possible. Naturally this can be difficult to achieve if you don’t have an unlimited budget and certain cars can be hard to find, but this is something I try to seek. Of course that doesn’t mean wrap the car in gold leaf, and we can all agree that certain color combos aren’t exactly beautiful, but you know what I mean. Today’s car, a 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo, is right in my wheelhouse when it comes to being unique. It certainly looks like a normal black 996 Turbo, which is true until you open the doors.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 Turbo Coupe on eBay

8 Comments

2012 Audi TT RS

Once in a while, a truly special package comes along and is seemingly gone in the blink of an eye. The TT RS was that package for Audi, marrying the fantastic 8J chassis with the outrageous 2.5 liter turbocharged inline-5 and a 6-speed manual. With 360 horsepower on tap driving all wheels and a sticker price below $60,000, it was Audi’s answer to the BMW 1M, and it was a good one. Though the driving experience perhaps wasn’t as “pure” as the Munich monster, the TT RS was a potent alternative that was on par with the competition, if not better. It was a Porsche killer at a fraction of the price, and the same rings true today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Audi TT RS on eBay

5 Comments

1983 Audi Quattro

There was a point where it was very hard to find a clean Mk.1 GTI anymore, and consequently the values on them rose sharply and quickly. Predictably, the moment that occurred a bunch of really nice examples subsequently popped up for sale and have continued to emerge as the car has finally been recognized as a classic. Now, couple that scenario with the racing pedigree of the Quattro and sprinkle in a dash of ///Mania into the mix and you’ve got a recipe for some very expensive cars.

With only 664 originally imported to the U.S. and a fair amount dead, balled up in rally stages or repatriated to the Fatherland, the remaining cars that do emerge generally fall into two categories: well maintained examples that fetch high dollars, or needy chassis for the project-minded enthusiasts. Today’s car looks quite clean at first glance, and though it’s not a perfect example it does appear to be highly original. How does that affect its value?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro on eBay

3 Comments