1976 Porsche 935 Gr. 5 Turbo by Kremer


Update 12/12/18: This Kremer-modified 930 sold for $173,600.

I honestly don’t know where to even begin with this one. It’s so audacious that I think it’s best just to have a look at it first and then discuss it. But let’s at least lay out the basics: This began as a 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo delivered in Germany. It’s original color was the Ice Green Metallic exterior we see here – presumably sans graphics – with a leather-to-sample green interior. It was sent to Kremer Racing for their 935K package and the end result is the car we see here. I love just about everything about this 930. It’s kind of insane and perfect at the same time and fits very well into the crazy Porsche racers of the ’70s.

This Kremer-modified 930 will be up for auction this Saturday, December 8 as part of RM Sotheby’s Petersen Automotive Museum auctions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 935 Gr. 5 Turbo at RM Sotheby’s

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Double Take: 1980 and 1981 Audi 5000Ss

Update 12/2/18: The manual 1981 5000S has been relisted with a reserve auction and opening $6,500 bid price. It bid to $5,100 last time around and I was surprised it didn’t sell. Based upon the other Type 43 sales recently, the current listing seems ambitious so we’ll probably see this one remain for sale for a bit.

Update 11/11/18: The 1980 5000S sold for $2,600.

I wasn’t particularly effusive with praise for the Type 44 Audi 5000S, although it was almost certainly the car which kept Audi’s doors open and lights on in the U.S. during the 1980s. Part of the reason that the Type 44 was so successful was that it was a major step forward from the Type 43, a car designed in the 1970s that felt…well, decidedly like it was from the 1970s. It was big, boxy, not particularly efficient and not particularly technically advanced – especially when compared to the model which replaced it.

However, there were some great qualities about the Type 43. It was the model that introduced mass turbocharging to Audi with the 200 5T, a de-tuned version of which would appear in the U.S. as the Audi 5000 Turbo. Audi used that idea to launch the Quattro a bit later, and the rest is history. The Type 43 was also quite a handsome car, though like many from the period its looks were hampered by the DOT-approved bumpers. Although well reviewed by magazines and offering class-leading features and technology, the Type 43 never really sold in great numbers. A total of 163,442 sold here between its 1978 launch and 1983, the last model year before the Type 44 replacements rolled into dealers. That was just a bit better than the C1 Audi 100 had sold here, a car with a less-than-stellar reputation. Clearly, the Type 43 spent most of its time erasing the memory of the C1, and consequently it is important as it laid the cornerstones for the more successful Type 44.

Today C2s are pretty hard to come across, though we do see a regular flow of them across these pages. Today’s examples are the more pedestrian (and more common to find) 100 horsepower naturally aspirated versions rather than the early Turbo. Still it’s a bit of a treat to get two at the same time, so here we go:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Audi 5000S on eBay

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1986 Audi 4000CS quattro

Update 1/17/19: Listed as sold for $3,400.

Update 1/2/19: Although listed as sold for $1,976, this ’86 4000CS quattro has been relisted again with no reserve. At last check, the seller is looking for nearly $9,000 on their site.

In a recent post discussing my ultimate Audi garage and what sedan I’d pick, I proclaimed that I’d take a 4000 quattro over a B5 S4. To many, that’s probably a strange choice. In many very measurable ways, the S4 is a superior car. It’s much, much, much faster, more comfortable, quieter, more efficient, and I could even see the argument that it’s more attractive. You can still buy parts for the S4 and you’ll have much more ‘street cred’ among most enthusiasts.

I, however, am not ‘most enthusiasts’. Indeed, if two people pulled up to a Cars and Coffee – one in a clean Nogaro Blue Pearl Effect S4 and one in a fairly used 4000CS quattro, I know which one I’d gravitate towards. I’d like to think I’m not alone, either. The 4000CS quattro was one of the best examples of “greater than the sum of its parts”. With only 115 horsepower on tap and fairly mundane roots in an economy car, you’d be right to not expect much. But the 4000CS quattro over-delivered in just about every way thanks in no small part to a healthy dose of DNA infused from its bigger, turbocharged brother.

Early in the month I took a look at a partially restored example and concluded that you couldn’t really expect more for the $4000 ask. That car has sold on, it would appear, but today another Zermatt Silver Metallic ’86 has popped up. Will the same hold true?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi 4000CS quattro on eBay

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2000 Audi S4

Update 11/25/18: This S4 sold for $8,302.

Continuing in my theme of the ultimate Audi garage, this post is going to seem a little strange. That’s because if I was going to pick an Audi sedan to collect, the second generation S4 would be pretty low on the priority list. In fact, I’m not sure it would make the top five. Without a doubt the D2 S8, the B7 RS4, the C4 S4/6, the D11 V8 quattro 5-speed, and the 4000CS quattro would all make it higher on the list.

It’s not that the B5 S4 isn’t compelling, with the twin-turbocharged V6 cranking 250 horsepower through a 6-speed manual. Barring the RS4 listed above, a box-stock B5 S4 will outperform everything else on that list in virtually every test. It’s just that the B5 S4 is a lot more desirable when presented as an Avant. So why is this sedan here? A few reasons. First, it’s Nogaro Blue Pearl Effect, and that should get a pass every time. Beyond that, it’s pretty clean, it’s got the unusual but pretty light Silver leather interior, it’s all stock, and it’s a manual. But as an added bonus, it’s also no reserve:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2000 Audi S4 on eBay

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1979 Mercedes-Benz 300D

Update 11/20/18: This 300D sold for $13,700.

On Saturday, I will say goodbye to my 1983 240D that I’ve rehabbed and cared for the past two years. It was a classic Craigslist love story of everything looking great in the photos, but after traveling a long distance to go buy it, the car wasn’t nearly as cherry as the photos showed or the seller described. Funny how that happens. Still, I reluctantly took it home after negotiating a whopping $100 off the asking price. The past two years have been fun as it seems like everyone loves the thing, except my passengers who had to be on time somewhere as 67 horsepower is no match for moms in their 300 horsepower minivans and the concept of time in general. I wouldn’t have bought the car if it wasn’t for the Labrador Blue paint and matching hubcaps, and that is probably why it sold to its new owner. I think the W123 chassis is still brilliant and feels so damn good even after 35 years, but it just can’t keep up with the war that is daily traffic. My W116 300SD is a far better car for that, hence why I chose to keep that one even though it isn’t nearly as handsome. Not a knock of the W123, but the W116 S-Class was made to be the best sedan in the world and at the time it was pretty damn close to being that, even compared to the much more expensive cars from Bentley and Rolls-Royce. I’m not the only one who feels that way.

Today’s car, as you might have noticed, also has a pretty great color. This European-spec Pea Green 1979 300D shows just a hair under 25,000 miles on the odometer and should be a pretty mint example. I was super excited to dig into it to see a time-capsule car, but unfortunately, this falls just a little bit short. Let me explain why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Mercedes-Benz 300D on eBay

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2002 Audi TT 180 Coupe quattro

Update 11/20/18: This Audi TT 180 Coupe quattro sold for $6,290.

In its first model year, the Audi TT was only available in one configuration – 180 horsepower Coupe. You could choose between quattro and FrontTrak drivetrains, but otherwise it was fairly limited. As a result, most outside of the Audi rings just referred henceforth to every single TT they saw as just that – a TT. But the naming convention was actually more complicated than that, as Audi steadily introduced more models and configurations for the small Golf-based sporty car. For 2001 came the Roadster model and the turned-up ‘225’ version of the TT which had…you guessed it! 225 horsepower from a massaged version of the transversely-mounted 1.8T. That remained the order of the day for a further two model years until the introduction of the 3.2 model. Although the 180 model continued right through the 2005 model year, this 2002 represents the end of the availability of the lower-horsepower motor with quattro all-wheel drive.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi TT 180 Coupe quattro on eBay

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1986 Audi Coupe GT 20V

This Audi Coupe GT 20V sold for $11,900.

Yesterday’s Jade Green ’74 911 Coupe was for me a ‘Greatest Hits’ example. It was a great color on a great classic, with great wheels, great flares, a great interior and great graphics. While I’m certain it wasn’t for everyone, the 911 market of today means that whatever genre your particular greatest hits are composed of you’ll probably find what you’re looking for.

The same cannot be said for Audi, especially when it comes to 1980s examples. Yet here, today, we have what I would consider to be a pretty good attempt to make the greatest Coupe GT. First off, there are some who like the early Coupe or Coupe GT models, but as I’ve had a string of them my heart beats to the later ’85-up chassis. Couple the better looks with improved European headlights and you’re starting off well. Make it one of the better colors for the GT – Alpine White L90E – and things are still great. Inside, the best interior to match that outside was the limited edition Commemorative Design “Mouton” red leather. You’ll want the Nardi leather wheel to hold on to. Kick the wheels up a few notches to really make the GT look more purposeful, and while you’re there, lower the ride height too.

But it’s the go that really separates this GT. The stock KX is hard to develop, between the lack of parts, the CIS fuel injection, and the lack of parts. Did I mention the lack of parts? You can go the cam route and do a bunch of other goodies and once it’s all done, you’ll come out the other side with maybe as much power as the later 2.3 NG. Maybe. But since the GT is a one-wheel drive wonder, you won’t want to overdo the power department. The solution is the short-lived 7A 2.3 20V DOHC motor found in the 1990-1991 90 quattro 20V and Coupe Quattro. Match the 164 horsepower, 7,200 RPM screamer to the 600 lb lighter chassis of the GT and suddenly you’ve got quite a stunner. And why not throw in some period graphics, too?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi Coupe GT 20V on Bring a Trailer

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Jade Green 1974 Porsche 911 Coupe

Sold and headed to Germany. Amount undisclosed. Good luck, Charles!

Here we have a Jade Green 1974 Porsche 911 Coupe. Anyone familiar with these 911s will recognize immediately that this one is not original. In fact, it’s quite far from it. Jade Green is purported to be its original color though, which is nice!

So what do we have? First, it’s undergone a Turbo-look conversion (I feel like this is becoming a theme of the cars I feature). The conversion, performed in 1987, utilized steel 930 rear flares and rockers, along with the usual addition of the 930 front and rear spoilers. The engine is now a 3.0 liter flat-6 from an early 911SC mated to a 915 5-speed transmission. Current mileage on the engine is believed to be around 20K miles post rebuild. The interior is a bit more standard for this car though the seats now come from a ’87 3.2 Carrera and have houndstooth inserts. They look pretty great. Otherwise, it sounds like other than the radio and speakers the interior is pretty much original.

Obviously it is the appearance here that is going to attract notice and I think from the outside the combination of that very bright Jade Green exterior with the wide body of the 930 really makes for a head turner.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Jade Green 1974 Porsche 911 Coupe on eBay

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Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa


Update 11/13/18: This 912 Soft-window Targa sold for $50,217.99.

I began my post on a recent 993 Turbo S by stating, “this is everything.” In a very different way my reaction to this Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa is similar. For pure lust the Turbo S certainly wins the day, but some of the allure of that car was in the details and that is where the overlap lies with this 912. There is enough here to pore over that interested parties could spend hours simply looking through these pictures.

We’ll begin with the color. Golden Green is not a color I’ve seen before. It only was available for a couple years in the ’60s and generally isn’t one that we come across among the many PTS 911s that have been produced since. It is sort of in the vein of Lindgrün (also called Chartreuse) that was produced in the ’70s though Golden Green doesn’t look as bright to me. As the name suggests it possesses a yellow/gold hue to its non-metallic green. That golden hue allows it to change kind of dramatically from sun to shade. The pictures here do a pretty good job of capturing that transformation. This is said to be the only Soft-window Targa produced in 1967 in this color with only 4 others made in 1968. So it’s very rare. I don’t know how many Coupes might also exist, but as I said this is the first I have seen it so I’m guessing there aren’t many.

The other part of this is the Soft-window Targa itself, Porsche’s answer to what they thought would be the death of the open-roofed car. Such tragedies never befell the car industry and the soft rear window eventually was replaced with the glass rear with which we’re all very familiar on 911 Targas even to this day. But the SWT is an interesting design and interesting engineering answer to a potential problem. They make for great historical models and given their short production run are quite rare in themselves. So there’s a good bit going on here and the seller has provided quite a few pictures to document this Targa’s condition. Add to all of that it is up for auction without reserve.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

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1985 Audi Coupe GT

Update 11/16/18: This GT sold again for $3,474.

Update 11/2/18: After selling over the summer for $3,000, this fairly clean driver-quality 1985 Audi Coupe GT is back on the market. The no reserve auction is so far below $2,000, and the seller gives a very honest breakdown of the current status of the car and notes more problems with the car than the listing over the summer. Despite that, it’s still fairly hard to find a clean GT, so this one might be worth grabbing!

Update 6/28/18: The best part of a year after originally being listed, this reasonably clean 1985 Audi Coupe GT is back in a reserve auction format. Since the Buy It Now was $4,950 last September, we can guess the reserve is probably at or over $4,000. The Coupe GT market has moved forward since last year, so will it sell this time?

The 1985 Audi Coupe GT debuted the aerodynamic B2 refinements in the 2-door version of the Type 85. Just like the 4000CS quattro I looked at the other day, smooth bumper covers front and rear were met with wide molding and new rocker covers. DOT-required 9004 halogen lights replaced the upright quad-rectangle arrangement on 1984 models, and the new grill sloped to meet stainless trim which surrounded the car. Inside was met with a revised dashboard with new softer-touch plastics, a leather covered steering wheel and few other changes. Mechanically, just as with the 84-85 4000 quattro, there were very few alterations between pre-facelift GT and the ’85. The same KX 110 horsepower inline-5 and 5-speed manual (3-speed automatic available) drove the car, but the ’85 up wore the same 4×108 hubs and brakes (in front, at least) as the quattro.

As with the 4000 line, most of the manual bits available in early B2s disappeared, and in you bought a late model it probably came standard with power locks, mirrors and windows. Most GTs also came equipped with a sunroof (manual and pop-out) and the rear wiper. Today’s example follows that convention minus the rear wiper. The package proved to generally be considered more than the sum of its parts, and in 1985 Car and Driver tested eight GT cars and proclaimed the Audi Coupe GT the best package available, beating ‘sports cars’ like the Supra, Mustang, and Camaro. One of the 3,586 sold in 1985, this Alpine White example reminds of a more simple time when you could drive a car at 10/10ths and still remain (mostly) at legal speeds:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Audi Coupe GT on eBay

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