1998 Mercedes-Benz CL600 7.0 AMG

If you are feeling déjà vu, you are on to something. Last month I checked out a 1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG and now a month later, we have the brother 1998 CL600 7.0 AMG. It is probably safe to assume these both came out of the same collection, and believe it or not, this one checks in with over 100,000 kilometers on the odometer. Long live the M120!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Mercedes-Benz CL600 7.0 AMG at Car Sensor

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1998 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG Wagon

When it comes to the old rule of Mercedes-Benz wagons are worth significantly more than their sedan counterparts, the AMG models are no exception. It is basically having your cake and eating it too, only this cake is really rare and extremely hard to find given they didn’t make many at all. Today’s car is a currently forbidden fruit as it isn’t 25-years-old yet, but the clock is ticking fast and it will be legal in no time. Say hello 1998 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG Wagon.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG Wagon on eBay

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1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG

I don’t think it is necessary to explain to those who understand.

That’s the only description from the selling dealer for today’s car. Granted, that was translated from Japanese, but it is the general gist of it. If you know you know, if you don’t, this isn’t the car for you. The iconic W140 Mercedes-Benz S600 punched out to 7.0 liters by AMG Japan and equipped with a bunch of other little special touches. In terms of 1990s sedans, this is up there. The price? Well, if you have to ask…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Mercedes-Benz S600 7.0 AMG at Car Sensor

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1998 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

We made it to April and the convertible season is finally here. Personally, I’m not a huge convertible guy, but I appreciate them, and certainly more so when it’s on an iconic model. For the Porsche 993 generation, Porsche had a tough job to stash the folding soft-top somehow behind the rear seats and in front of the engine firewall, all while making it look good. Truth be told I think they did a great job considering the challenge, but I can’t say I’m ever tempted to go buy one. However, if I were in the market, today’s car might be one of the better ones.

This 1998 911 Carrera Cabriolet up for sale in Miami has the understate black exterior but went all in with Lobster Red leather on basically everything. Even better, this one has some extra goodies to top it all off.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

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1998 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Please take your seat and buckle your seatbelts, because you will need them for this one.

This is a 1998 Porsche 911 Turbo S that was reportedly commissioned by His Highness Sheikh Nasser Al-Mohammed Al-Sabah, the 6th Prime Minister of the State of Kuwait. It is by far one of the craziest color combinations I’ve ever laid my eyes on. As you can see from the outside, it’s an unusual shade of Vanilla Yellow, but it isn’t until we open the doors until we see one of the most bizarre and perhaps offensive color schemes in existence. Please brace yourself for this one.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Turbo S at Pfaff Reserve

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1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S

Just when it looks like 993 prices were stabilizing, here come the Carrera 4S! While the C4S 993 cars always brought a premium based on the good looks borrowed from the Turbo, all of a sudden these are bringing Turbo-like prices. Yes, it makes sense that the really low-mileage examples are bringing big money, but regular examples? Still into the six-figures and then some. This 1998 up for sale in Atlanta has a really healthy amount of miles with a little over 72,000, but the price? Hold your breath.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S on eBay

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1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S

The 1998 model year was the swan song for the 993 generation, along the air-cooled engine. For some reason, Porsche skipped on the 1998 911 Turbo for the US, so we were left the Targa, Cabriolet 2 and 4, Carrera 4S, and Carrera 2S to chose from for the last of the run. All models were wore the wider body shell, supposedly because Porsche had an abundance of them they needed to use before switching to 996 production. But “abundance” doesn’t necessarily mean there were a lot destined for North America. For the most desirable Carrera S, that meant 1,292 for North America. However, there was some funny math from Porsche on these. All of them were technically manufactured in 1997, but Porsche held some of the supply back and rolled them out as 1998 models. Today’s car was built in October 1997, so it would have been considered a 1998 model year anyway, but I’m guessing this was near the end of the run.

Now as we are well over 20 years-old on these C2S examples, demand for them is high. It is totally understandable. It’s the last air-cooled naturally aspirated, manual gear box, rear-wheel drive Porsche 911. They can even sell for Turbo money if the spec is right. The thing is, just because they are in demand, doesn’t mean you shell out the money simply because they exist. This car in Texas is a perfect example why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

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1998 BMW Z3

In the realm of unappealing BMWs, the Z3 might just take the cake. Sure, it’s partially rescued by unusual body styles or a big motor in the case of the Coupe or the M editions. But for a standard Z3, there seems to be little appeal. It was not the best built car from BMW, it was certainly not the best looking car they’ve made, and in the case of the four-cylinder models, you didn’t have much in terms of performance, either.

Here we have a ’98 Z3 1.9. Under the hood was the 138 horsepower M44, and since the Z3 wasn’t exactly the feather weight of the original Miata, it resulted in pretty average acceleration. It would wisk you to 60 mph in just a hair under 10 seconds, and hitting 100 would take the best part of half a minute. It did return nearly 30 mpg on the highway, but then my 135i does that too, and it has a bit over twice as much horsepower. Heck, go easy on the throttle and the M3 will return almost 30 on the highway.

But if you want a budget convertible, the Z3 is a solid German option. First, you could get a manual. Second, they’re cheap to fix and cheap to run. There were a lot of them, too, so used parts are available. And this one is presented in a pretty neat color – Violett-rot 2 (328) with some good options. Is there hope?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 BMW Z3 on eBay

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1998 Volkswagen Jetta GLX VR6

Purists decried the arrival of the “grown up” A3 chassis Golf and Vento, sold as the Jetta in North America. It was expensive, it was heavy (relative to the A1 and A2 chassis, anyway) and the performance was dulled – that was, until the introduction of the GLX model that replaced the earlier GLI models. Now sporting the VR6 that had debuted in the Corrado and Passat a few years earlier, the GLX was all around a screamer. It might have been heavier than the GLI it replaced, but it was quicker to 60, quieter on the highway, more comfortable and better in crashes (if things went south), and returned close to the same fuel economy as the thirsty, buzzy and boxy 16V had. The Volkswagen Jetta III, as it was known in the US, was introduced at a time when US sales were at their lowest and it appeared as if VW was considering pulling out of the US market, but this generation Jetta became the best-selling Volkswagen by the time the production run ceased in 1999. It was insanely popular and seemed to be the defacto college car of choice for both men and women. Because of that, many of these Jettas fell into disrepair or were totaled, so it’s rare to find a lower mile and clean GLX these days:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Volkswagen Jetta GLX VR6 on eBay

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1998 BMW M3 Sedan

So the E30 M3 is probably out of your league, and clean examples of the E46 generation are getting more expensive by the day. The solution is still the E36. The Internet will make arguments all day long about how this car isn’t as special as the ones that came before and after, but the reality is that it’s still a M3. And you could make a compelling argument that it did (and still does) a better job of bringing sports car performance to a practical package that’s affordable to almost everyone. The S52 3.2 liter inline-6 doesn’t sound as great on paper as the race-derived S14, but it had two more peak horsepower than that strung out four. More telling was torque; 236 lb.ft at 3,800 rpms versus the Sport Evolution’s 177 lb.ft at 4,700 rpms. Yes, it was heavier; the curb weight of the M3 Sedan you see here was about 3,200 lbs. But the additional power made up for it, and the results should be no surprise. 0-60 was dealt with over 1/2 a second quicker than the Sport, a gap that was maintained right through the quarter mile.

And practicality? It’s no contest, really. Not only is the E36 safer, but the E36 added 4-doors to the recipe. Not to mention the costs to keep one running – check out the price of a S14 rebuild today, for example. Owning a legend often doesn’t come cheap, and in this case you the current bid on this 48,000 mile 1998 M3 is cheaper than what a proper rebuild of the race motor will cost you.

Then there’s the driving experience. Downgraded ///motor be damned, these cars are absolutely stellar to drive. I’ve driven each of the first three generations of M3 on track in anger, and the second doesn’t give up much to the bookends. It’s not as toss-able as the original nor as powerful as the third, but overall it’s right there. The steering is near telepathic, the shifting precise, the power band broad. It’s a deceptively good car and deserves far better than the treatment it’s currently getting, which is to mostly be ignored in the marketplace:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 BMW M3 Sedan on eBay

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