1987 Audi 4000CS quattro

We usually try hard to steer clear of nefarious characters, both in automotive products but more often in sellers. Today’s 4000CS quattro comes from a flipper in the Pacific Northwest who has gained a well-deserved reputation in the rather close-knit classic Audi community for misrepresenting, over selling, incorrect information about the cars, high and unrealistic prices and my personal favorite – the inability to take a whole picture of the car with normal perspective. So why am I once again showcasing a car of his? Well, two-fold; I’d like to correct the once again poorly researched information he’s provided (and, he managed to provide TWO whole frame photos!), and it’s just so infrequent that we get to gaze on a reasonable condition 4000CS quattro that I thought it was worth a look. Can we see past the seller to find a potential reasonable ride?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS quattro on eBay

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Seeing Red: Audi 4000 quattro Roundup

The Audi 4000 quattro was like a Sherpa to thousands of European car enthusiasts; a steadfast winter standby with slick styling and Rally-bred sure-footedness. On paper, looking back today the 4000 was probably a bit dull; nearly 2,900 lbs of brick-on-brick design with a measly 115 horsepower motivation. But numbers don’t tell the whole story of the B2 Audi, because in any configuration it’s a great handling car. The quattro, however, had some special features that would have been headline items for any sports sedan until very recently; four wheel independent suspension with a large front sway bar and four wheel disc brakes. Couple that with the first all-wheel drive system fitted to a small car, sprinkle some luxury items in and cut the price of the exotic Quattro in half, and it didn’t matter that it wasn’t particularly fast. What the 4000 quattro was, though, was one solid all-around performer. The subtle changes from the front-drive sedan resulted in a car that felt more grown-up and refined, yet still pushed you to do silly Hoonigan things. 4000 quattro owners that I’ve talked to almost always have the same proud story; the time that they managed to get their 4000 quattro stuck. Normally, that would be a cause for embarrassment, but such was the grip of the plow-through-anything small sedan that it became a badge of honor when you outdid the car’s twin-locking differentials. The secret, of course, was just to make sure all four wheels were in the air! But because of this type of sillyness inducing competence amongst dropping residual value and a second or third tier of ownership that didn’t always repair or maintain the cars, few are left in good condition. However, I managed to scratch together a trio of three-quarters of the U.S. bound production years, all in the fetching shade of Tornado Red. We’ll start with the end of the run:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS quattro on eBay

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Rare B2s: 1987.5 Coupe GT “Special Build” and 1986 4000CS Quattro “Commemorative Edition”

I’m not sure who is funnier – enthusiasts or marketing specialists. Let’s start with marketing specialists; for Audi, the introduction of a new “Fox” design brought with it a specific name for North America – the Audi 4000. There were various trim levels available, but by 1985 the trim specifications were limited to “S” specs. Now, at one point, the “S” actually stood for a slightly different Sport trim specification, but in 1985 you couldn’t get a non “S”. That changed slightly in 1986; if you wanted a quattro, your only option was the 4000CS quattro. Presumably, that stood for Commemorative Sport – but while in 1986 the CS versus S meant the difference of a turbocharger in the 5000 model range, in the 4000 there was no option. In part this can be viewed as the problem with the cars directed towards the United States; in Europe, there were two different trim specs with different motors, too – the 80/90 and 100/200. But to throw even more confusion into the lot, there was then a series called the “Commemorative Design” which was launched in 1986, too. Those Commemorative Design editions were available in Coupe GT, 4000CS (front drive), 4000CS quattro and 5000CS models and were a celebration of 100 years of the automobile. Convoluting things even more, there was now a 4000S and 4000CS front drive, but no 4000S quattro. Make sense? It seemed uniquely un-Germanic, but also signified that Audi did things differently than the rest of their compatriots. What did the Commemorative Design get you? Well, that’s interesting, too – because it varied by model. In the GT and 4000CS quattro, it was color-matched trim in your choice of white or graphite metallic with a special red leather. The GT was slightly different, with a digital dashboard making its appearance in that model – but not only in the Commemorative Design, as a slew of normal 1986 models also came with the digital dash for some reason that no one completely understands. The red leather was not carried over to the 4000CS front drive interestingly – it instead got Audi 5000-spec wheels, Coupe GT brakes and split leather and Alcantara seats. The 5000CS Commemorative was only available in front drive spec and similar to the 4000CS front drive, making the front drive 5000CS more luxurious than the 5000S quattro – which was more expensive. Of course, these cars weren’t called the “CD” models – because there actually was a 5000CD in Canada which was spec’d more like the 5000CS. Still with me? To quote Adam Sandler from a memorable Saturday Night Live skit, “Who are the ad wizards who came up with this one?”

Now to complicate matters even more, in 1987 Audi launched a revised Coupe GT which it then promptly discontinued. The car was substantially changed – a new engine bumped up to 2.3 liters (the NG/NF that would see duty in the later 80,90 and 100 models), along with new to the GT 4-wheel disc brakes and – like the Commemorative Design, color matched trim. There was also a slightly different gearbox and different dashboard – still digital – just to confuse things even more. There were only a few hundred of each of these models that were imported to the U.S., making this whole exercise a bit strange in the grand scheme of things. But what’s undeniable is that B2 enthusiasts generally love these cars the most, creating their own names for them – the “Special Build” GT and “Commemorative Edition” 1986 models:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987.5 Audi Coupe GT on Craigslist

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1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

The less glamorous version of what was a fantastic chassis and engine combination, the Audi 4000 quattro brought rally-bred performance to the masses. You really could think of it as the original “WRX” because while the big-brother Quattro that stole all of the headlines in its day is currently a reasonably good value compared to some of its contemporaries, when they were new the turbocharged, box-flared brother was simply out of reach of most enthusiasts. Original sticker price of the Quattro put it around the same price as a well-equipped Porsche 911; equivalent today to a base model R8. It was therefore very exciting to see a nearly identical drivetrain layout passed down to the more pedestrian sedan version, complete with a similar-sounding inline-5 and locking differentials. You got all of this in a slick-looking 4-door package for around $20,000 – not cheap, mind you, but half the price of the Quattro. For many fans of the Quattro package, it proved to be legendary in its own right:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on eBay

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1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

“It was bound to happen”. Over the past few months we’ve seen a spike in Audi 4000 Quattro prices, and with the spike the nice examples have started to come out of the woodwork. As a $2,500 car, you keep it until it dies. As a $5,000 car, you treat it well and it changes hands from time to time. Once prices crest $10,000 – prices that 4000s haven’t brought since the 1990 – people start flipping them. It makes sense; the 4000 Quattro is a great car but for $13,000 you can get many nicer, faster cars. Last week I wrote up a Tornado Red 1985 4000S Quattro that had reported fresh paint and seemed to be a good example, but failed to push a price as high as I expect the owner was looking for. Today’s example is arguably a bit nicer, but shown in the same shade – will you be seeing red?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on eBay

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Double Revisit: Early and Late 4000 Quattros – Which would you choose?

Two of the 4000 Quattros I wrote up in December are still on the block. Which of these all-wheel drive wonders would you choose? The first of these cars is a Zermatt Silver 1984 example which needs some love, but is now available at a much more realistic price point – less than half of what the asking price was in December.

The below post originally appeared on our site December 6, 2013:

-Carter

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1986 Audi 4000CS Quattro – REVISIT

Only a few weeks ago we witnessed a mint condition 1985 4000S quattro sell for over $12,000 – a remarkable feat. But only a few weeks before we showed that impressive condition 1985 we had an equally impressive condition 1986 model for a then staggering to contemplate $9,800. In the meantime the price has fallen slightly, first to $9,200, and now the car has appeared on Ebay. With no reserve on the auction, it looks like the seller is hoping to roll the same dice that the 1985 seller utilized. Any bets on where this lower mile, equally impressive 1986 ends up?

-Carter

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1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

The Audi 4000 Quattro is one of those cult cars that was too good for its own good. Why? Well, they were so good in the snow and ice that they were used – hard – and put away wet. That means today that there are precious few of the 4 year run of these cars still hanging around. Especially rare are the early 1984 models, but later models that were saved are often either red or white. Occasionally you get the grey-scale models of color in with a Graphite Metallic or Zermatt Silver, but it’s pretty infrequent that you see the three blues; Copenhagen Blue, Oceanic Blue Metallic, and Sapphire Blue Metallic. Today’s last of the run 1987 4000 arrives in that last shade, with a host of upgrades:

Year: 1987
Model: 4000CS Quattro
Engine: 2.2 liter inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 224,000 mi
Price: $2,750

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on Craigslist

Sadly the time has finally come for me to part with my beloved 1987 Audi 4000cs quattro. This is the 5th one of these that I have owned over the years. I shipped it from Seattle 10 years ago with around 70k miles on it, now it has 224k and still going strong. Some details about the car:

kinda rare sapphire blue color with very nice gray cloth interior
very well maintained, huge stack of receipts
AC works great
has trip computer
factory wheels with snow tires

many upgrades including:
Stebro stainless cat-back exhaust (great sound and will not rust)
H&R lowering springs and Boge turbogas struts
drilled and slotted rotors, braided stainless lines, Ate super blue fluid, new rear calipers
Borbet type C 15″ wheels with great Toyo tires
E code headlights with relays

known issues:
some rust starting around the edges, solid underneath though
outer sunroof panel needs replaced (have it)
minor oil leak, as yet unknown origin
needs coolant flush (have everything to do it)
cable that switches vents to defrost not working (simple mech fix)
rear windows intermittent (likely broken wires at door jamb)
intermittent rattle in exhaust (probably loose cat internals – it has a lifetime warranty though 😉 or you can just remove the loose parts… )
minor dent in left front fender where some jack@ss “rubbed” it with his giant suv in a parking lot
crack in right headlight – sealed up and been like that for over 9 years

Here’s the big plus – this car comes with my 15 year collection of spare parts. I stripped several 4000 and coupe GT cars over the years, and kept everything. There are: doors, hoods, trunk lids, bumper covers, engine, trans, rear diff, driveshaft, entire suspension, many sets of headlights and instrument clusters, grilles and small ext trim, rear windows, and many many boxes of small parts. At least 3 pickup truck loads full. You could easily keep this car running for another 10 years with this stuff.

For the car and all the parts I am asking $2750 or bo. Price is flexible to a point, but the parts are probably worth what I’m asking. Hopefully this will go to someone who will love it as much as I have.

It’s obvious that the seller is an enthusiast, and the list of enhancements to this car are pretty stellar. The wheels are a perfect upgrade, and as a former 4000CS Quattro owner with Stebro exhaust, the sound that produces is so enjoyable. The Euro lights are a necessary upgrade if you’d like to drive at night, and the seller states the car comes with enough spares – 3 trucks worth – to keep you busy for a long time. Last week’s 1987 4000CS Quattro I wrote up sold fairly quickly for most of it’s asking price at $3,250. In comparison to that car, the general exterior condition isn’t as good – specifically, the rust creeping through some panels would need to be addressed fairly quickly to avoid further problems. Despite that, I think this 4000 is fairly close to the mark for what it is; a well modified, older car that you can have some fun tinkering with.

-Carter

1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

Audi sedans of the late-80s just don’t have the performance reputation of Mercedes and BMW, as the most notable reports of their acceleration were when it supposedly happened with no driver input. The good ones, however, started bringing Audi’s secret weapon, something BMW was just beginning to play with and Benz wasn’t into yet. The irreplaceable Quattro on a good-looking sedan set Audi apart, and today’s 4000CS is a great reminder of this. The seller is a bit of Audi fanatic and it shows.

1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro for sale on eBay


Selling a 1987 Audi 4000 cs Quattro. Car is white with gray interior. Great condition car. under 140k. Mint Interior. No rust on this car and its a California Car. New Fuel Pump and Cooling Fan switch. Car runs and drives very well. Takes a try or two on cold starts tho. 5 speed manual, rear diff lock. power windows, locks, sunroof. 138K. MINT interior. Like New, cloth is soft. Bolsters solid. Has been redone and is soft like brand new off the showroom floor. no sun damage or anything, its brand new material..Just installed a brand new driver side rear door handle. All Doors open.:) Brakes work perfect and well. Ebrake works as it should. All calipers have audi rings on them. Exhaust sounds good other than catalytic converter problem. Tires are 75% and matching. All Bushings feel good and Steering is tight. Stereo Works and sounds pretty good. Original Leather Wrap Steering Wheel, Horn Works.
Car does need a catalytic converter, the one thats on it rattles at times and needs replaced. cruise control doesnt work, have the unit to make it work, needs installed. Has H.I.D. Bright Headlights. one side needs bulb. power mirrors seem to work, but the mirror isnt moving barely at all. All Glass is good. Has A/C and it works, but isnt ice cold. Great winter car.
Car has been repainted at some point as it was originally black in color. Whoever did the paintwork did not do the best quality of paint and its not the best. Dont expect a perfect paintjob because it is not. Have lots of pics on photobucket. Go to photobucket or http://s120.photobucket.com/albums/o172/hoopster21/ or search for hoopster21 which is my profile there and go to albums and then its there in the 1987 audi 4000cs Quattro album. I have been selling off my audi’s and I need this one gone as I need the room for another project I have.

I love how this car looks. Even if the paint isn’t perfect, white with black accents and wheels looks perfect (though the emblems on the front quarter are a little too big). A new interior is a great addition, and 140k miles isn’t too bad other than needing a new catalytic converter. The 2.2l isn’t magic at 115hp (25 years ago, no less), but I’d say it’s begging for some VW/Audi plug-n-play. With a $2,700 Buy-It-Now, it’s a great start for what could be an amazing Audi. Even as is, it looks like a good buy to me.

-NR