Motorsports Monday: 1979 Porsche 911

A friend of mine and I were sitting around recently, musing over what kind of 911 we’d own if we had the money. The genesis of this was his Porsche 911 ownership; he had a ’85 911 cabriolet, and while he enjoyed the car it was a bit….well, basic in terms of creature comforts and ride quality compared to his current M3. There’s some charm in that, but having driven both I’d agree that the M3 is the better day-to-day car in nearly every way. But both of us agree that, money no object, the idea behind the Singer 911s is pretty compelling; take a more modern 911 and give it the classic look, but keep most of the modern amenities plus the modern powertrain, brakes and handling. It’s become quite a popular recipe, and with classic 911 values seemingly on an endlessly rising trajectory it’s quite viable to restore or resto-mod a 911 into a dream ride and make your money back, if not then some. Today’s example is pretty interesting and unique, though – I believe it’s the first time I’ve seen someone take a 930 chassis and turn it into a “regular” 911. Backdating the late ’70s look to the early 1970s and adding in some of the iconic IROC bits, the builders took modern Fuchs replicas and a built up 3.8 naturally aspirated motor and created one pretty awesome package:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 911 on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1972 Porsche 911 RSR Tribute

This past weekend was the Goodwood Festival of Speed; if you missed it once again, or have no idea what I’m talking about but are reading this, it’s something you desperately need to examine in your motoring life. There are historic races held around the world, and there are motoring events held around the world, so one more held on some rich dude’s driveway shouldn’t be a big deal, right? Wrong, it’s perhaps the single most unique and impressive automotive event in the world. The FoS reunites classic race cars often with their original drivers, driven in anger up the 1 mile hill of Lord March’s drive. It’s tougher than it would seem to be, and since it’s inception it’s attracted every major automobile manufacturer and gathered some of the most impressive machines ever made. From the first race cars to modern Formula One racers, the Festival of Speed is a celebration of all things automotive. For example, this past weekend, Mazda was the featured marque – but they also had gathered 7 of the 8 Mercedes-Benz 300SLRs ever built, and had Sir Stirling Moss, Hans Herrmann, Jochen Mass, Sir Jackie Stewart, and many other notable champions driving four of them up the hill. That was one of many priceless convoys parading by motorsports enthusiasts; it’s simply the largest collection of the most significant race cars ever made in the world coupled with the historic champions that drove them. Why talk about this in this tribute listing? Well, look closely at the lower portion of the door, and you’ll see that the builder of this 1972 Porsche 911 – which tribute’s Hurley Haywood’s Brumos-sponsored 1973 Sebring RSR – went so far as to include the Goodwood FoS number sticker from when the car appeared:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Porsche 911 RSR Tribute on eBay

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Motorsports Monday RS Style: 1979 and 1987 Porsche 911s

It goes without saying that the Porsche 911 is one of the most popular modified chassis ever conceived, and a fair amount of those modifications are track-based. The results are sometimes mixed; however, one of the more popular trends which I think is pretty slick is backdating 911s. It’s ironic, since for some time it was more popular to update the looks of many of the older race cars to new 964 or 993 bodies. However, the surge in pricing in the 1960s and 1970s 911 market has resulted in many backdated cars coming to market. Obviously, the advantage is that you get a better driving and more powerful car with more options than original, but it’s got the look of the sought after early models. However, probably the biggest advantage is that of price; with a lower entry cost, prospective buyers aren’t afraid to use the 911 where it is well suited; driving fast on a race track. Today I have two different takes on backdated 911s, both with a nod towards the mega-buck RS model. Which is the one you’d choose?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1972 Porsche 911T and 1980 Porsche 911SC

A rather sad thing is happening within the Porsche world; the 911 is increasing in value so rapidly that its original dual purpose nature is being threatened. The 911 was, for some time, one of the few cars that really was effectively track-ready right out of the box. While it’s seldom been the all-out fastest circuit car available the 911 has been the dependable choice; lightweight with enough power to thrill you and enough idiosyncrasies to challenge you as a driver. Today I’ve rounded up two track-ready examples that still can be street driven; both 3.0s but with different yet classic interpretations of the 911 design, which is the winner?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Porsche 911T on eBay

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Motorsport Monday: 1974 Porsche 911

As 911s get increasingly faster, more complex and more expensive, there is solace in looking towards the past and more simple times in Porsche history. Those are the time, indeed, that made Porsche the legend it is; it was the lightweight, underpowered but reliable cars that created the Porsche racing legend. Sure, over the years, brutes like the 917 and 962 stole the show, but in the background there has seemingly always been the 911 racing – and winning. In the past few years we’ve witnessed these older 911s increase tremendously in value; the result of desirability and dwindling numbers, at least in part because of that racing heritage. If you wanted to build a great fast track car in the 1980s, where else would you look but the older 911 market? Unsurprisingly many were turned into track or race cars and some are still thrashed today. Such is the case with today’s 1974 911, turned into a track/race car but treated to some recent love in a unique shade of Porsche history:

Year: 1974
Model: 911
Engine: 2.7 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 on eBay

1974 Porsche 911 Race Car Spec 911

VIN 9114100184

First year of the new body 911’s.

Fresh IROC Chartreuse Green complete paint job

Fresh 2.7 with fuel injection and racing ignition, performance S Cams

915 5 Speed with Limited Slip and fresh rebuild, Racing shifter all new bushings

7” and 8” Fuchs alloys wheels

Rothsport full roll cage installed by Profab motorsports

Full Race suspension and set up for Road or Solo racing

All new bushings and suspension parts with little use since completed

Full RS bumpers and Carrera rear wing

Fuel Cell and all new plumbing

Dual Setrab front mount oil coolers, runs cool at high ambient temps ( built for southern California weather)

Rothsport removable racing wheel

Sway bars front and rear

Performance racing exhaust

Alloy calipers and racing brakes and rotors

Lots of extras and Performance parts, Momo wheel and Corbeau seat

Legal for PCA, SCCA, NASA racing, or great DE/Track Day car

Very solid car for lots of track use, save your GT3, this makes more sense and safer!

Call 503 819 9007 Matt

Combining the great pieces off of several Porsches, you get the IROC whale-tail in the rear, the RS nose in the front, and enough color personality to make everyone green with envy. Couple that great looking paint job with the requisite Fuchs alloys, a fresh engine and a 915 5-speed and you’ve got a great looking track candidate. The seller also states the suspension has been freshened, another bonus to the potential buyer. If newer cars thrill you by performing incredible feats of speed, older cars actually teach you about driving, and the 911 is one of the best at forcing you to learn car control. Too fast going in, you’ll probably spin. While that’s not likely the outcome you’d desire, in a world of increasingly “unspinable” cars the prospect of having a car swap ends on you forces you to communicate with the car. It’s this communication that has been lost in recent generations, and you’ll not find many better cars to talk to than an older 911. This car looks absolutely fantastic and I’m sure would be a fun drive; pricing will likely end up in the mid-$20,000 range – short money for a lot of character and a great looking ride.

-Carter