Baby It’s Cold Outside – 10K Friday AWD-Off

Maybe you’re lucky, and it’s sunny and warm where you’re reading this. Or, perhaps you’re stuck under a rock – or in the case of Buffalo, several feet of snow. But like it or not, winter is upon us a bit early this year, and if you are in Buffalo you probably need some sort of snow-cat to get to the local store. Hopefully, that’s not the case for most of you but I wondered what sort of all-wheel drive car you could get on a $10,000 budget. As it turns out, you might be able to get a little more than you expected – so here’s a few offerings from the different manufacturers, starting with the folks that started it all:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Audi A4 3.0 quattro on eBay

Continue reading

2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

Let’s take a moment to spend some time with the unloved. Porsche’s 996, the first of the water-cooled 911s, remains one of the least valuable, appreciated, respected – basically just pick your adjective – variants of the 911. There are good and bad reasons for that, but we are at the point now where a buyer looking for an entry-level 911 may be best suited by finding a 996 that is in good shape and using that to see what all the fuss is about. The example here is a beautiful Cobalt Blue Metallic 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe, located in California, with 82,400 miles on it. 2002 saw a number of changes to the 996 that would benefit this car: displacement was increased from 3.4 liters to 3.6 liters, along with a corresponding bump in horsepower and torque. The model also received a minor face lift to help quiet the uproar over what many considered a particularly ugly 911, and, specific to this car, the Carrera 4S was released allowing buyers to experience the wide-body glory of the Turbo, complete with upgraded suspension and brakes, while still making use of a lower-strain naturally-aspirated engine.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe on eBay

Continue reading

Tuner Tuesday: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

If yesterday’s Koni Challenge 997 was a little too extreme for your Porsche dreams, you don’t need to look far for another stunning deal. We’ve talked a lot about what an incredible performance package the 996 twin turbo still is; over a decade on, even box stock these are still cars that perform at near exotic levels. Despite that massive performance, they’re available for a relative song – we’ve even seem some higher mileage examples dipping into the $30,000 range. Today’s example has been turned up as many have, now capable of 600 horsepower ripping pavement through all four wheels. That means your trumped-up Beetle can embarrass most Ferraris, Lamborghinis and some small airplanes for only $50,000. It’s so fast, not only the pictures but even the dyno readout is blurry from speed:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Continue reading

Motorsports Monday: 2005 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

The fall from grace of the 996 has resulted in some stunning deals on pretty incredible cars. They’re not without their problems; the 996 isn’t the most attractive Porsche produced and there are known engine issues to combat. But if you’re looking for an inexpensive track weapon with and impressive amount of speed, it’s pretty hard to best the 996 package. While you can get a very nice example of a GT3 – Porsche’s then pinnacle of dual-purpose street and track package – for around $50,000 and drive it to the track, if you’re willing to spend just a bit more you can look at leaping into another level of performance with the “Cup” car. Stripped down and stiffened up, these factory racers are simply stunning with their speed and were cutting edge less than a decade ago, yet today you can find an excellent example like this 2005 model for less than $80,000 – only a third of what a new one would cost you.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on eBay

Continue reading

2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S

It’s been a little while since I featured a 996TT so now seems as good a time as ever to see how the market stands for these performance bargains. The example featured here is an Arctic Silver 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in California, with 16,483 miles on it. 2005 was both the last year of the 996 and also the first year of the 997. Because the 997 Turbo would not be released immediately Porsche continued production of the 996 Turbo and for its final year of 996 production introduced the Turbo S. From a power standpoint the Turbo S essentially was the previously offered 996 Turbo plus the X50 power package. Add ceramic brakes and interior upgrades and you have the Turbo S. While Silver will never be my favorite color it has become pretty desirable among Porsche fans over the last decade and at the very least should allow you to cruise without attracting too much attention.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

Continue reading

Tuner Tuesday: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 Techart

It’s fairly shocking that for around the same price as a fairly lightly optioned base model Cayman, you can leap into entirely another world of performance with a 911 Turbo. Of course, there’s a price to pay for this relative leap in performance, and that’s that you have to settle at this price point for the current ugly duckling of the Porsche world – the 996. Now, of course there will be drawbacks to buying into an older car – for one, it’s not new with a warranty, and the 996 isn’t the prettiest Porsche ever built. But in terms of performance for dollar spent, right now it’s pretty hard to beat a package like the 996 Twin Turbo with the X50 option.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo X50 Techart on eBay

Continue reading

2003 Porsche 911 Turbo

With all of the attention lavished upon the ever-escalating market for air-cooled Porsches, performance values do remain on the market and there are still plenty of buyers looking for their next toy rather than their next investment. It is almost always the case that the easiest place to start for a performance bargain is the 996 Turbo. To be clear, these are not necessarily cheap cars; you aren’t finding a good one for $15K. But, with more than 400 hp being delivered to all four wheels via a 6-speed transmission, the overall performance capabilities of the 996 Turbo are very difficult to beat in terms of bang for your buck. For ultimate performance, buyers should look for one with the factory X50 package, but even a non-X50-equipped Turbo is still very quick. The example featured here is a Seal Gray 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Connecticut, with 46,510 miles on the clock.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Continue reading

Motorsport Monday: 1998 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Factory Race Car

While copying factory cars such as earlier’s RSR Tribute has become a popular pastime for Porsche race enthusiasts, the reality is that those cars have a semi-limited market because they’re not authentic. However, about 16 or so years ago buying real factory race cars became a lot easier as Porsche began to officially sell the then new 996 GT3 Cup version of the venerable 911. With an upgraded 3.6 race motor, full cage and race suspension, air jacks and center-lock BBS wheels, this was as close to the big leagues as you could get from the factory. Additionally, Porsche continued to run a single marque race series, call the Supercup, that is had run with previous generations of race 911s. The Supercup was a feeder series for more popular forms of endurance racing and still is, but the car has remained the same; outside it looks a lot like the 911s you can drop down to the showroom to buy; underneath, it’s pure race car. As with previous generations, every few years there are upgrades that effectively render the older cars obsolete and they become much easier to purchase; today’s 1998 is an example of just such a car. Though they may not be as fast as the current generation, usually these cars are still quite competitive in club racing and are considerably more affordable than new options. Additionally, factory race Porsches, especially ones with significant racing history, have proven to be a good investment long term. If you can gamble on the right one and stomach the high running costs, you’ll have an impressive and capable machine that will probably come out the other side worth more than you paid:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on Ebay

Continue reading

2003 Porsche 911 GT2

While the 911 Turbo doesn’t garner many complaints, there is one that does come up: since the 993 it has only been available with all-wheel drive. Some feel that all-wheel drive lacks the purity of rear-wheel drive and for others it is simply a matter of the additional weight brought on by all-wheel drive. Thankfully, Porsche provided a solution: the GT2. The formula for the GT2 was somewhat simple: more power, less weight. Shedding the all-wheel-drive system in favor of rear-wheel drive took care of much of the weight savings, while also providing a dynamic balance that more closely resembled the ferocity of the earlier 911 Turbos. Improved suspension, chassis, and braking provided the necessary means to keep the car in line and in the end buyers had the ultimate 911. With the introduction of the GT3 for 996, the GT2 was no longer the center of Porsche’s homologation efforts, but it nonetheless remained a track-focused variant of the 911 Turbo. Which brings us to the car featured here: a Black 2003 Porsche 911 GT2, located in Texas. With more than 26K miles, the mileage isn’t low for a car like this, but it’s hardly a high mileage vehicle either.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Porsche 911 GT2 on eBay

Continue reading

2002 Porsche 911 Turbo

The more I write about these cars, the more they have grown on me. Like many, I was never a huge fan of the body design of the 996, but I have gradually come to admire these cars over time. I will never like the headlights, but the rest of the shape bothers me far less than it once did and for any buyer’s performance dollars the 996TT is seriously tough to beat. I especially like a black 996TT, like the one featured here: a Black on Black 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo that clocks in with a mere 6,200 miles. While a standard 996TT is hardly a slouch, this one has had some engine work that’s sure to make what was already a quick car, even quicker still. Thankfully, the car retains its stock appearance, something that anyone shopping for a 996TT knows, sadly, is not always the case.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Continue reading