1991 Audi Coupe Quattro with 17,000 Miles

For me, it’s been a week of some unappreciated cars, and the Audi Coupe Quattro ranks up there as one of the most unappreciated Audis. But unlike the wild turbocharged wonders that were available in the rest of the world, the U.S. market received only the 7A inline-5 20 valve motor. Basically, it was a 16V Volkswagen motor with one more cylinder; with a 7,200 rpm redline, the sonorous 5-pot put out a respectable 164 horsepower. That wasn’t much less than the E30 M3 had and matched U.S. bound turbocharged Quattros – but the power delivery was such that the car didn’t feel fast off the line, and the weight didn’t help. The B3 was hefty, saddled with improved safety options like PROCON-10, anti-lock brakes and a stronger platform, it was also decidedly more luxury oriented with electric seats, sunroof, windows, air conditioning and even an electronic lock for the differential in the rear. It was the 1980s Audis all grown up, but the impression left in many enthusiast’s mouths was that it was a bit soft and a bit slow. Ironically, the 7A even gained a bad reputation amongst enthusiasts as an underpowered unit that lacked torque – but a look at the original power numbers prove it was the most powerful of the non-turbo, non-V8 cars Audi offered at the time. 1992 would see a switch to the B4 platform with the V6 power unit and the end of B3 production; slow sales and a high price meant the Coupe Quattro was removed from the U.S. bound lineup after only a reported 1,500 made it here. Despite their perceived lack of sport, the legendarily stout Coupe Quattros served many of their owners well and many are still kicking around. Only one, though, is in the condition of today’s example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro at Sutherland Auto Sales

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1991 Audi 80 quattro RS2-spec

In the realm of German cars, Audi seems to be the unappreciated marque when you go back a few generations. But even then, amongst the leper colony of Audi products that no one wants, the Audi 80 quattro is close to King. I say close to King, because truth be told I think there are even less appreciated products from this time – the front drive Audi 100, for example. But go to 1991, and within Audi all enthusiasts are generally interested in is the 200 20V quattro, the Coupe quattro, and occasionally someone will mention the V8 quattro 5-speed. The 80 quattro, though, was one of the smartest options if you wanted a robust, small all-wheel drive sedan. True, the switch from B2 to B3 gained a fair amount of weight and not much more power from the NG 2.3 liter inline-5. It felt, if anything, a bit slower off the line than the 4000 quattro had been – a car not noted for it’s straight line dominance. But its unpopularity ironically made it quite popular as a tuning platform; after all, it does share some DNA with the much loved RS2. In this case, the builder of this car has thoroughly upgraded this B3 to new levels of power and performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi 80 quattro on Classic-Audi.co.uk

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Über Rarität: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet

When BMW upped its game in the E36 chassis with the introduction of the M3, specialty tuner Alpina answered with the B3 3.0 and later 3.2 in step with BMW. The successor of the slightly less powerful B6 model, the B3 kept many of the same improvements to the E36 chassis – unique stabilizers, springs and shocks, and larger brakes. Inside the B3 received the normal Alpina-style shift knob, steering wheel and seats, and in their typical style Alpina provided unique front and rear spoilers along with their own badging. Of course, the package was rounded out by some of the best looking wheels ever fitted to a BMW. While the B3 was down on power to the European M3 3.2, it wasn’t really much slower – again in typical Alpina fashion, the car was tuned to make the most of the power that was available rather than just provide a shockingly high output number. A reported 1,000 of these ultra-exclusive B3s were produced, with about 2/3rds of those being the earlier 3.0 model. With only 342 of the 3.2 produced, the pool is already very exclusive on these. Add a manual transmission when most are automatic, special order Dakar Yellow paint and a cabriolet model, and this is among the most exclusive Alpinas ever made.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1999 Alpina B3 3.2 Cabriolet on eBay

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1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V – REVISIT

The 1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V that I wrote up early last month is back up for sale, with a substantially lowered “Buy It Now” price – now only $2,800 from $4,200. Clearly the seller is motivated to move this car, but these are solid, good performing and long-lived cars that are reasonably easy to work on. Parts are a tad bit hard to come by and expensive these days, but the price makes this rare Audi compelling.

The below post originally appeared on our site May 5, 2014:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi 90 Quattro 20V on eBay

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1990 Audi 90 20V Quattro

While the Audi 100 Avant I wrote up the other day was certainly a treat to see, for most late 1980s and early 1990s Audi enthusiasts, the cars that they’re interested in are the quattro all-wheel drive models. There are certainly many popular ones to choose from; recently we’ve seen the 4000 quattro and S4 quattro really take off, but the 200 20V quattro and Coupe quattro also grace these pages on a regular basis. One car we don’t see much of, though, is the 90 20V quattro; effectively the same car as the Coupe underneath, these 90s were rare when new and are more rare today. Featuring the awesome 7A 20 valve 2.3 motor and the legendary quattro drive system, unlike the earlier 4000s they were galvanized, meaning at least some could survive life in the environment which they were designed to conquer:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi 90 20V Quattro on eBay

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Afternoon Accessories: 1990-1994 Volkswagen Passat Hella DE E-code lights

While it wasn’t an overwhelming sales success and a large percentage of the problem seemed to be the somewhat polarizing looks, I always preferred the look of the B3 Passat to the Quantum it replaced and the facelifted B4 that succeeded it. I thought the smooth, grill-less look was neat and clean; I liked the GTi-spec 2.0 16V motor, and the original chin spoiler reminded me of the first GTi’s lip. There aren’t many options for modifying these cars though, but one of the popular options – albeit rare – was to install the Hella DE projector light conversion. They’re hard to come by, but there’s a set on Ebay today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990-1994 Volkswagen Passat Hella DE Lights on eBay

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1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

About a week ago I posted a rare condition and color 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro that was priced towards the higher end of the market for Coupe Quattros. However, considering the overall condition, lower miles and unique color, it wasn’t outrageously priced and seemed like a solid purchase. Today there’s a 1990 Coupe Quattro that’s a more familiar shade for these Audi Coupes and in even better condition with less miles. Take a look at this Tornado Red 1990:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on Craigslist.org

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1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

Last week I wrote up a clean Euro-modded 1991 Coupe Quattro, suggesting that one with a strong ownership history and the right mods was a good buy. Today, I’ve got an even stronger example and even though it doesn’t share the same desirable Euro goodies, it’s certainly the one I would choose of the two. There are several reasons for this, but first has to be the color – this car was special ordered in Glacier Blue with navy blue leather. While that may not be to everyone’s taste, I think this example is simply stunning. With a strong ownership and maintenance history, this car looks like one of the best examples we’ve seen lately:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on Ebay

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1991 Audi Coupe Quattro

The third generation Audi Coupe had big shoes to fill. The first generation 100 Coupe S, while not a big seller and not available in the U.S., is generally regarded as one of the more attractive German car designs in recent memory. Then there was the second generation Coupe, which in GT form was voted one of the best handling GT cars of the 1980s and was also an attractive design in its own right. But of course, both paled in comparison to the legendary Quattro, its impact celebrated universally now and rightfully afforded a place amongst the best and most influential cars in history. The replacement for these cars, then, had to be pretty special – and in many eyes, it just wasn’t – especially in U.S. form. Sure, the 20V normally aspirated engine was a great motor – but it was saddled with too much weight and the styling was rather bland compared to the fluid looks of the 100 and the angular awesomeness of the B2. Consequently and coupled with Audi’s image issues following the 60 minute debacle, not many of these Coupes sold in the U.S.. In spite of that, as there were with nearly every Audi model there was a devoted fan base that saw through the expensive pricing, the so-so performance and not particularly exciting styling to what was a quite competent highway car, capable of carrying a much better load than the cars it replaced with the new hatchback configuration, and as ever a snow machine. As these fell into second and third ownership, many turned towards the much more potent European versions for inspiration on how to correct the car that Audi sent to the U.S., and for good reason – the Euro versions were hands down better looking in either B3 or B4 version than what was sent here. Two decades on, the styling of this GT has aged pretty well compared to some of the contemporaries’ styling and these are handsome coupes overall. Today’s example is the last of the run for the U.S., but has been refreshed with Euro goodies and some paintwork that help it shrug off its many miles:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi Coupe Quattro on Quattroworld.com

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1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

While earlier this week I reviewed a importable 1989 Audi Coupe, the car we received in the United States in late 1989 was this car, the 1990 Coupe Quattro. While on paper the new B3 chassis car had specifications very similar to the U.S. spec Audi Quattro that it replaced, the truth was that the new Coupe sported much more luxury and the accompanying weight, dulling performance and making the car feel fairly sluggish. What the B3 coupes did gain was a much more user-friendly design and a less driver-dependent all-wheel drive system. With a commodious hatchback and fold-down seats, it was now easier to carry large items that the Quattro simply couldn’t fit. Further, where the early car had driver-selected lockable differentials, the new car sported the next generation of quattro, with Torsen torque-splitting diff in place of the old lockers and a electronic lockup for the rear that was disabled above 15 m.p.h.. Despite the dumbed-down for the driver but smarter for the car AWD system, these Coupes were nearly as good as the previous generation cars in snow and ice. They arrived expensive and at a bad time for Audi, so it’s no surprise that they’re a rare find these days:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

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