1982 Alpina C1 2.3

It seems we often list multiple cars from the same seller; in some cases, that’s simply because they have the best examples that are available. EAG and Sloan Cars are great examples of this, amongst many. However, there’s a second tier of cars that we feature – eye candy that lies abroad and would be more difficult to procure. Such is the case with dealers like 4Star in England who seemingly has an endless supply of incredible examples of cars we all want. I think, however, that we need to add “ExoticCarsJapan” to the list, since this is now the third successive Alpina and fourth BMW I’ve written up from them. However, unlike the two previous E28 5-series B9s, today’s example is quite a rare example – a 1982 C1 2.3 E21:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Alpina C1 2.3 on eBay

Continue reading

Heap of the Week: 1976 Audi 100 2-door Sedan

Let’s get this right out of the way – the first generation Audi 100 isn’t the most popular Audi ever built. It’s not even in the top ten most popular Audis. In fact, the Audi 100 is one of the cars that helped solidify the general automotive public’s belief that Audis were rusty, unreliable and unnecessarily complicated cars that you should stay away from at all costs. So what is a 1976 Audi doing on these pages, especially if it needs a restoration? Should it die the death everyone believe it should? We here at GCFSB say a resounding “No!” Why? Well, for the simple reason that too many of these 100s have already passed into the automotive underworld, leaving precious few in serviceable condition. And they’re not the worst cars ever made; sure, they’re not as iconic as the Quattro, but the 100 was a pleasant looking sedan that rode beautiful, was quite and composed. As effectively an entry into a new market for Audi, it was an impressive design. Last year, I looked at a restored 1972 100 LS that was asking well over top dollar; but this car is the more rare 2-door variant in need of a restoration:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Audi 100 2-door on eBay

Continue reading

1972 Audi 100 LS

The third generation Audi 100 (5000 to the U.S.) was so revolutionary as a mid-sized sedan, it’s easy to forget that there were two generations of Audi 100s that preceded it. Long before the legendary Quattro debuted, Audi was actually selling a reasonable amount of 100LSs and Foxes here in the 1970s. Not the sportiest or most luxurious of the mid range sedans, the 100 wasn’t the best competition for BMW and Mercedes-Benz, but in its day it was a respectable car. Unfortunately, its day didn’t last very long; plagued with reliability, rust and electrical issues, many of these 100s left a sour taste in U.S. buyers mouths. Now 40 years later, finding a clean 100 is a tough job, but once in a while one pops up for sale, such as today’s black 1972 100LS::

509

Year: 1972
Model: 100LS
Engine: 1.9 liter inline-4
Transmission: 3-speed automatic
Mileage: 66,000 mi
Price: $11,111.11 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Audi 100LS on eBay

I purchased this several years ago from the original “old lady” owner / driver in Maryland. It was all black with original paint. It was just professionally repainted with a cream colored roof.

Has the original tan vinyl interior, with a little over 60,000 miles on the odometer. In very good condition, drives well. Minimal rust. Never been in an accident. I still drive occasionally, it gets 27mpg. Front brakes have been totally redone, booster bypassed for now. Excellent tires and new front shocks (Boge). The AC/air conditioner has been converted to a newer, more efficient type of compressor, replacing the old York, which vibrated too much and was quite a drag. The pulleys have all been machined to use current 38 degree V belts which was a real boner problem, because Audi spec’ed the original belt at something like 60 degrees and then stopped selling them! System not charged at the moment.

Radio is installed but not hooked up. This car has a good dash pad. Headliner has hole above right visor, not visible when visor in the parked position. I have many spare used and NOS parts. Car is located in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Gold/Silver accepted for payment. This is one of the best riding cars I have ever driven!

509

I feel like it’s a common thread in my posts, but indeed this isn’t a car for everyone. Finding parts is pretty tough though they are available. Most of our fan base would pass this car off as too soft or not sporty enough compared to similar Benz or BMW models. Few want an older automatic. And, as is the case with this car being from Maryland originally, there is more rust in this car than appears on the surface. All of that said, it makes a very reasonable alternative to some of the normal iron that you see at shows. I have a friend with one of these in better shape, and it always seems to draw a crowd at shows. Sure, most people have bad stories to tell about some past relation that owned one and it broke, but what cars from the 1970s didn’t break time to time? I think this car’s design has continued to age well and still looks sharp, especially in black.

After talking with my 100 expert friend, we both agreed that this car is heavily overpriced. The very best 100LSs are not currently bringing the asking price of this car, and while this car is very nice, it’s not the best example out there. The rust would have to be addressed long term if you wanted to keep this, and doing so will be pricey for sure. Given the condition of the car, we both agreed that $5,000 – $6,000 was the right asking price for this car. The owner is certainly ambitious asking double that amount, but honestly is unlikely to get it. Despite that I hope this car finds a new loving owner who will continue to keep it up; finding clean 100LSs is going to continue to be a very rare event!

-Carter

2001 BMW C1 200cc Scooter – REVISIT

The BMW C1 Scooter that we featured two weeks ago has been relisted. For sale in Chicago from our reader Johnny, this is an uncommon piece here in the US and already has a fair amount of bidding interest this time around.

2001 BMW C1 200cc Scooter on eBay – REVISIT

The below post originally appeared on our site September 10, 2012:

We’ve had a few oddball machines here at GCFSB over the years, but this may be the most unexpected feature vehicle yet. The BMW C1 was devised with city dwellers in mind. An enclosed scooter, the C1 was designed around a safety theme, as it had shoulder belts, crumple zones and an aluminum roll cage. Two models were offered, the 125 and 200, which had a 124cc or 176cc one cylinder engine, respectively. Manufactured by Bertone and sold between 2000 and 2003, the C1 was never offered to US customers. This particular C1 comes to us from our reader Johnny and is located in Chicago.

2001 BMW C1 200cc Scooter on eBay

We have a lot of time, effort and money into listing this motorcycle on eBay. Please be respectful of that and be certain that you intend to follow through with the sale. Your bid is a contract to buy. We have the listing set up to accept bids only from US bidders in an effort to prevent scammers from ruining the auction. If you are a legitimate bidder outside of the US and you have a way to have the bike picked up at our location without it being crated, please e-mail Chris at chris@motoworkschicago.com. Provide him with your ebay ID and confirm that you can arrange international shipping and have the bike picked up uncrated at our location in Chicago, and he will gladly add you to the list that allows you to bid.

My beloved BMW C1 is up for auction. I’ll be sad to see this one go, as I lusted for one of these machines from the time it was introduced in the mid ’90s until last year when I purchased her. If you are not familiar with what the C1, here is some background: First presented by BMW in 1992 at the IMFA in Cologne, Germany, the BMW C1 is a small motorcycle with a safety cage.

After selling 10,614 in 2001, the C1 only sold 2,000 in 2002 and ceased production in October 2002. The C1 was never available in the USA, and it didn’t take off in the UK as BMW had hoped, partly because the Government refused BMW’s argument to let riders use it without wearing a helmet. Several other European countries accepted the company’s claims that, with the twin seat belts, it was impossible for the rider’s head to hit the ground in an accident.

For the first time in a modern motor vehicle, the C1 combines the advantages of two-wheeled motorized transportation with the strengths of the automobile. The C1 is targeted to urban European markets as an appealing alternative to small cars and crowded mass transit systems. The ultimate congestion beater, it is easily maneuverable, versatile in traffic, easy to park and, due to its distinctive appearance, readily noticed by other motorists.

The C1’s most innovative design feature is its emphasis on safety. It is the first two wheeler in the world to offer a high standard of passive safety. BMW claims its crash tests have shown that, in a head on collision, the C1 offers a standard of accident protection comparable to a modern subcompact car. In fact, the C1 is so safe that it can be ridden without a helmet. The German, French and Spanish authorities have allowed an exception to the helmet law for the C1.

Why is it so safe? The driver is protected by shoulder height protective bars, an impact absorbing front wheel guard and a rigid aluminum roll-over cage. The C1 thus incorporates a car-style safety cell, formed by its aluminum “space frame” and roof struts. The C1 is fitted with twin seat-belts in a “cross your heart” fashion to keep the rider safely inside the vehicle.
The C1 is powered by a 125cc, or a 200cc engine mated to a continuously variable, stepless automatic transmission. Just twist the throttle and go! The C1 engine features double overhead camshafts, sophisticated inlet-port shaping and electronic fuel injection. The engine is content to run at high speeds, thanks to a compression ratio of 13:1. The C1’s generator, the most powerful ever on a two-wheeler at the time, develops 400 Watts, so you are good to plug in accessories and still power the heated seat and grips.

Things I like and interesting data on the scoot:
She is safe to ride without a helmet, and its really true, I did a pile of research online and found that all of BMW’s testing states that the scoot is actually safer to ride without a helmet.
The centerstand system is amazing, one lever raises and lowers the suspension, and the other lever deploys the stand. It’s genius.
The windshield wiper has a fluid reservoir and and a button to spray.
The optional rear case is huge.
She is not top heavy the way I thought she would be.
Top speed is about 70mph

This scoot was bought new by a German car collector and grey market importer. I purchased the scoot from him. She has a 50 state legal Washington title that is ready to be transferred into your name. I have her insured with Progressive as a BMW scooter, the policy is less than $200 per year. Everything on the scooter works as it should. The top case was dropped by the previous owner and is scratched a bit from that, the detailed pics show that damage.

If you are a Beemer nerd and a scooter nerd like myself, this thing is the ultimate. I bought her with 1700km last year. I more than doubled that, had a blast doing it, and now it’s time to let someone else take their turn.

When they were new, these scooters retailed for around $6,000 to $7,000. I’ve never seen a C1 in the US, so this unique two-wheeler represents a rare opportunity. A quick scan of some European sites brought up a few of these and most are priced around the $2,000 mark. You can buy a basic, brand new Vespa these days for just a tad over $3,000, but, I’m guessing the same person that would be attracted to such a scooter may not necessarily fall in love with the C1. It’s nice to see, however, manufacturers who are still receptive to put products like this outside of the mainstream into production. More often than not it’s when new technologies are tried out and lessons are learned with regards to manufacturing.

-Paul

2001 BMW C1 200cc Scooter

We’ve had a few oddball machines here at GCFSB over the years, but this may be the most unexpected feature vehicle yet. The BMW C1 was devised with city dwellers in mind. An enclosed scooter, the C1 was designed around a safety theme, as it had shoulder belts, crumple zones and an aluminum roll cage. Two models were offered, the 125 and 200, which had a 124cc or 176cc one cylinder engine, respectively. Manufactured by Bertone and sold between 2000 and 2003, the C1 was never offered to US customers. This particular C1 comes to us from our reader Johnny and is located in Chicago.

2001 BMW C1 200cc Scooter on eBay

We have a lot of time, effort and money into listing this motorcycle on ebay. Please be respectful of that and be certain that you intend to follow through with the sale. Your bid is a contract to buy. We have the listing set up to accept bids only from US bidders in an effort to prevent scammers from ruining the auction. If you are a legitimate bidder outside of the US and you have a way to have the bike picked up at our location without it being crated, please e-mail Chris at chris@motoworkschicago.com. Provide him with your ebay ID and confirm that you can arrange international shipping and have the bike picked up uncrated at our location in Chicago, and he will gladly add you to the list that allows you to bid.

My beloved BMW C1 is up for auction. I’ll be sad to see this one go, as I lusted for one of these machines from the time it was introduced in the mid ’90s until last year when I purchased her. If you are not familiar with what the C1, here is some background: First presented by BMW in 1992 at the IMFA in Cologne, Germany, the BMW C1 is a small motorcycle with a safety cage.

After selling 10,614 in 2001, the C1 only sold 2,000 in 2002 and ceased production in October 2002. The C1 was never available in the USA, and it didn’t take off in the UK as BMW had hoped, partly because the Government refused BMW’s argument to let riders use it without wearing a helmet. Several other European countries accepted the company’s claims that, with the twin seat belts, it was impossible for the rider’s head to hit the ground in an accident.

For the first time in a modern motor vehicle, the C1 combines the advantages of two-wheeled motorized transportation with the strengths of the automobile. The C1 is targeted to urban European markets as an appealing alternative to small cars and crowded mass transit systems. The ultimate congestion beater, it is easily maneuverable, versatile in traffic, easy to park and, due to its distinctive appearance, readily noticed by other motorists.

The C1’s most innovative design feature is its emphasis on safety. It is the first two wheeler in the world to offer a high standard of passive safety. BMW claims its crash tests have shown that, in a head on collision, the C1 offers a standard of accident protection comparable to a modern subcompact car. In fact, the C1 is so safe that it can be ridden without a helmet. The German, French and Spanish authorities have allowed an exception to the helmet law for the C1.

Why is it so safe? The driver is protected by shoulder height protective bars, an impact absorbing front wheel guard and a rigid aluminum roll-over cage. The C1 thus incorporates a car-style safety cell, formed by its aluminum “space frame” and roof struts. The C1 is fitted with twin seat-belts in a “cross your heart” fashion to keep the rider safely inside the vehicle.
The C1 is powered by a 125cc, or a 200cc engine mated to a continuously variable, stepless automatic transmission. Just twist the throttle and go! The C1 engine features double overhead camshafts, sophisticated inlet-port shaping and electronic fuel injection. The engine is content to run at high speeds, thanks to a compression ratio of 13:1. The C1’s generator, the most powerful ever on a two-wheeler at the time, develops 400 Watts, so you are good to plug in accessories and still power the heated seat and grips.

Things I like and interesting data on the scoot:
She is safe to ride without a helmet, and its really true, I did a pile of research online and found that all of BMW’s testing states that the scoot is actually safer to ride without a helmet.
The centerstand system is amazing, one lever raises and lowers the suspension, and the other lever deploys the stand. It’s genius.
The windshield wiper has a fluid reservoir and and a button to spray.
The optional rear case is huge.
She is not top heavy the way I thought she would be.
Top speed is about 70mph

This scoot was bought new by a German car collector and grey market importer. I purchased the scoot from him. She has a 50 state legal Washington title that is ready to be transferred into your name. I have her insured with Progressive as a BMW scooter, the policy is less than $200 per year. Everything on the scooter works as it should. The top case was dropped by the previous owner and is scratched a bit from that, the detailed pics show that damage.

If you are a Beemer nerd and a scooter nerd like myself, this thing is the ultimate. I bought her with 1700km last year. I more than doubled that, had a blast doing it, and now it’s time to let someone else take their turn.

When they were new, these scooters retailed for around $6,000 to $7,000. I’ve never seen a C1 in the US, so this unique two-wheeler represents a rare opportunity. A quick scan of some European sites brought up a few of these and most are priced around the $2,000 mark. You can buy a basic, brand new Vespa these days for just a tad over $3,000, but, I’m guessing the same person that would be attracted to such a scooter may not necessarily fall in love with the C1. It’s nice to see, however, manufacturers who are still receptive to put products like this outside of the mainstream into production. More often than not it’s when new technologies are tried out and lessons are learned with regards to manufacturing.

-Paul