1995 Porsche 911 Carrera 4

One thing that doesn’t make sense to me is the Porsche 993 market. A handful of years ago they had a sudden rise and seemed to settled at prices are were somewhat understandable. The Turbo was the king of the hill, then you had the C2S and C4S, followed by the regular C2 and C4, and bringing up the rear was any Cabriolet or Tiptronic gearbox car. Now in 2021, things have reached insanity levels. Any 993 Turbo is going to start at minimum $150,000 and have to potential to go well over $200,000, while the C2S and C4S are starting at $100,000 and making their way towards that $150,000 mark. The rest of the lineup? Thankfully, they’re not drafting to closely. Maybe a rising tide doesn’t lift all boats?

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1999 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe “GT3RS”

If you haven’t noticed, prices of the 996 GT3 have been on the rise over the past few years, and consequently, it’s no longer the budget Porsche special that it once was. But Porsches being Porsches, there are of course options! Probably smartest if you like the GT3 look but don’t have the GT3 budget is an Aerokitted 996, like the one I looked at in July:

2000 Porsche 911 Carrera 4

At about a quarter the cost of a real GT3, you’re getting a lot more than 25% of the experience. However, there are also homebrew options, too, and this particular C4 coupe went a step further. Or perhaps a step too far. Or a few miles too far. You decide:

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2000 Porsche 911 Carrera 4

It’s hard to believe that just two years separated the end of 928 production and the beginning of the 996. Is there irony in the fact that the 928 was intended to replace the 911, and instead it was a water-cooled 911 that finally ended the reign of the air-cooled designs from Stuttgart? Perhaps. And in many ways, the 996 was immediately hated for it. It was too soft, too round, too….well, flawed – whether it’s from the exterior design, the interior quality, or the engine woes. But isn’t that what a 911 is all about? Maybe the 996 is the most 911-ish 911 there has been. Chew on that.

While you ponder my proclamation, let’s look at a pretty tempting example. Because let’s face it – flawed though it may be, the 996 is still a 911, still makes great noises, and still turns heads. But one thing it won’t do, generally, is break the bank – making them really appealing. And that’s exactly what we have here – a Guards Red 2000 Carrera 4, replete with the Aerokit and Sport Design wheels that make it an early Euro-spec GT3 clone. Sure, it doesn’t have the chops to back it up – but then, it’s also under $25,000:

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1995 Porsche 911 Carrera 4

Don’t get too excited, but it looks like prices of Porsche 964 and 993 models have started to cool off. When I say “cool off,” that means going from red hot to still hot enough to burn you. It seems the giant run up of everything aircooled Porsche from about five years ago has started to wane a little, with the the non-special cars that are in just average condition being the first ones to fall. That means all the C2 examples with over 100,000 miles on them and some cosmetic flaws, along with the boring colors. I don’t think this has anything to do the world’s current situation as the collector market is still very stable, but rather an increased focus on the rare cars and ones with very low miles. Today, a 1995 C4 up for sale in Nevada certainly seems like a decent price for what it is.

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1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Leichtbau

The rarest of the rare. Of all of the various 911 models, the 964 pretty much leads the pack when it comes to the ultra-rare. I joke occasionally about the myriad configurations of modern 911s, which I think at this point has resulted in around 22 different model variants from which buyers can choose. There’s pretty much a variant to suit every possible need (though still no rear drive Targa, come on!). While we couldn’t really call the 964 similar it does seem to be the model where Porsche really began to see just how many different ways it could offer their flagship car. The other significant difference is that none of the current 911 models really is all that rare. There are a couple special editions that were produced in very low numbers, but those aren’t too much more than unique option packages producing cosmetic differences. Even the Turbo S Exclusive is limited to 500 and while that’s not a lot of cars it’s nothing compared to the car we have here.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Leichtbau. According to Canepa, the sellers of this particular example, there were 22 total produced. I’ve seen that number listed elsewhere as only 20, but perhaps there were one or two additional special requests, which kind of sounds like what occurred with the one here. Like a lot of Porsche’s most extreme performance models the Carrera 4 Leichtbau wasn’t for sale in the US market. You’d almost never have a change to buy one. Here is one such chance.

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2012 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS

Rare color or undesirable color? It is a question that presents itself pretty much any time I come across a Porsche in one of the many less common colors Porsche has produced. Of course, in some cases a color may be undesirable during its period of production and then become more desirable years later as preferences shift. Yellows and greens kind of come in and out of favor in this way, likewise the many variants of brown from the late-70s and early-80s suffer under a reversal in popularity.

In the case of the car here, an Ipanema Blue Metallic 2012 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 GTS, located in Washington, we may have one of those situations. Available in the final years of 997 production, we see very few 911s painted in this color. Anecdotally it isn’t difficult to find stories of buyers getting nice discounts to take them off of a dealer’s hands after sitting on the lot for too long. Though a standard color offering its rarity does seem related to its desirability, or lack thereof. We haven’t moved far from its original production date so I’m not sure enough time will have passed for preferences to have changed. However, Ipanema Blue isn’t too far removed from a variety of lighter blues Porsche produced in the ’80s and those cars don’t seem to elicit much derision. So is it a color that might become more desirable or one that, like quite a few colors over the years, will fade away to be forgotten?

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Tuner Tuesday: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion

It’s generally safe to say that we all like RUF. Their full builds can be spectacular both in appearance and performance, but almost any RUF to wear the badge, or simply share the name, possesses upgrades that make them very desirable. We very rarely see any related to the 964 so when we do come across one it’s always worthwhile to pause and take a closer look.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet that was sent off to RUF for a “full” CR4 conversion perhaps around the year 2000. Like many conversions what exactly is meant by “full” might be a matter of debate, but in this case the engine does appear to have been blueprinted by RUF with horsepower now at 330. That engine likely represents what buyers will care most about. From the documentation it looks like the owners of this car purchased it from RUF in May 2000, but it’s not clear when that means the conversion itself actually occurred. Maybe there is other documentation to support that. It then was imported into the U.S. where it has resided ever since.

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1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

I love a red interior. Even the very bright red interiors. Porsche has long made such interiors available to those who like them. I also am a big fan of the 964. Curiously, I’m not sure I’ve ever featured a 964 with a red interior. Well, at least, not a standard 964. I think there have been a couple ultra-rare models, but I won’t count those.

At last I have found one: this Black 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with a Matador Red interior and 105,420 miles on it. I don’t think I’ve seen Matador Red before, not knowingly anyway. It looks great with just the right amount of brightness. While it may only be the lighting in these pictures it doesn’t appear quite as bright as some of Porsche’s other offerings like Can-can Red or Lobster. I think for most that likely gives it a nice balance. For those who find a black car to be a bit dull, perhaps this interior will help liven things up. It’s quite beautiful.

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1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

I’m kind of mesmerized by this shade of blue. The color is Tahoe Blue Metallic and here it adorns a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet for sale in Florida with 63,755 miles on it. We’ve featured Tahoe Blue Metallic before, but don’t see it often. It’s a rare color and wasn’t available for very many years. What really has me awed is the way it possesses so much color even while being photographed in the shade. It really pops and as someone who has always been a big fan of blue in general it’s a great version of the color. It won’t snap your head around the way Riviera Blue might, but it won’t blind you either. It reminds me of a richer version of Iris Blue from the ’80s and is just really pretty.

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Maritime Blue 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

I’ve passed by this 993 a few times and I’m starting to think that I shouldn’t have. I obviously notice it any time I see it. Maritime Blue, especially on a 993, will do that. It’s a great non-metallic blue and it really grabs your attention. So why ignore it? For starters it is for me the least desirable model: a Carrera 4 Cabriolet. In fairness, it’s a manual transmission so it could be worse, but overall it’s not a model I’d seek out. Second, I hate the wing. Like really hate it.

So the color would draw me in, I’d take notice, see the wing, and move on. However, that’s not entirely fair. There’s a lot of good going on with this 911 and the wing is something that can be changed. So let’s take a look. As I said this is a paint-to-sample Maritime Blue 1997 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet. It has only 30,412 miles and the paint is mostly original – both bumpers have been repainted. It also has some interesting options with the rear seat delete, the hi-fi sound package, and 18″ Technology wheels among a few others. There’s more going on here than I initially realized.

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