Motorsports Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing Tribute – REVISIT

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On the verge of three years ago I took a look at a neat 911 Carrera RSR tribute. Rather than take the typical path of copying the IROC cars, the builder of this particular car chose the “Mary Stuart” Martini Racing example to clone. The car was named because the wrap around rear duck-tail spoiler reminded some of the high collars which were the vogue during Mary, Queen of Scots’ reign. With its unique tail offsetting those iconic colors, it is certainly an attention getter. However, the seller has now attempted to shift this car more or less continually since 2013 – first at an asking price of $165,000, then dropping in 2014 to $135,000, and now back up to $165,000 presumably to try to capitalize on the current 911 market. It is without a doubt a neat build and unique execution, so even though it’s unlikely to trade this time around again I thought it was worth another look:

The below post originally appeared on our site September 9, 2013:

I think I’ve made it pretty clear that I think Martini Racing colors are just awesome. Some people insist everything looks better in “Gulf Blue”, but for me, it’s those Martini stripes that made some of the best looking race cars (and in a very few cases, even improved road cars). Case in point is today’s example; perhaps one of the strangest downforce attempts of the 1970s on a Porsche – the Mary Stuart tailed Martini Racing RSR. While a neat design in some ways, it certainly looks odd from other angles. Today’s 1971 911 is a recreation of the original, but you can’t deny that it looks fantastic in the proper Martini Racing colors of the 1973 RSR:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 911 RSR Martini Racing replica on Ebay

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Motorsports Monday: 1992 Porsche 968

One of my first days instructing at a high performance driving school, my student walked up to me after the morning meeting and told me he was under the weather and not up for driving. But, he said, he didn’t want to miss out on track time, so would I be willing to drive him around Lime Rock Park in his car? Sure, I said, and we strolled over towards his ride – a track prepared Porsche 968 on Michelin Sport Cup tires. I have to admit I was slightly apprehensive; a car I was unfamiliar with wasn’t the end of the world, but that day track was wet and while I had been the wheel man a few times in my father’s 924S on track, most of my seat time was spent in my front-drive Audi Coupe GT. But out on the track we went, and the 968 quickly proved why it gained a reputation as such a superlative driver’s car. Near perfect balance matched with smooth power delivery. The limited slip differential in that particular 968 also helped to translate the power to the ground, and on a soaked track we were one of the fastest cars that session within two laps – it just felt natural to push the car. Down the “No Name Straight” (which both has a name and isn’t a straight), the 968 twitched lightly under full throttle but was never out of control and never once felt uncomfortable. Even before then I had a high regard for the watercooled front-engine Porsches, but it solidified my love even more and it’s always nice when I see a track prepared 968:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 968 on eBay

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1977 Porsche 924 Martini Edition

Continuing on my theme of watercooled transaxle Porsches in famous livery, in 1976 Porsche won the World Sportscar Championship primarily with its 935 and 936 models in Martini Racing livery. To commemorate this achievement, in 1977 if you walked into your Porsche dealer and selected option M426 (Code E19) on a new Porsche 924, you’d be handed the keys to a uniquely colored coupe. The outside of each was Grand Prix White, and along the side were triangularly shaped stripes in the now famous Martini Racing livery. The “Tarantula” alloys were color-matched white as well. Underneath, the Martini cars were equipped with front and rear sway bars – the only real performance option. Inside was what really set the car apart, though, with scarlet carpet and seat centers, contrasting piping, a leather steering wheel and of course a commemorative plaque to let you know you were in the house of a World Champion!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini Edition on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S

For those that haven’t had the pleasure of driving a 944 Turbo S, allow me to describe the sensation. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to be the stone in a sling shot, it’s a pretty good analogy. My first drive in a S saw me pull up to a merge onto a secondary highway. The slightest gap opened in traffic, and since I was in a Porsche I naturally thought that half a car length with the closing traffic at 65 m.p.h. seemed doable. Clutch out, foot on the floor, and….nothing. I thought I stalled the car. I had just enough time to look down in disbelief, feel the blood draining from my head and look into the mirror, uttering “Oh…shi” when BAM – the car came on boost. Like the intro to Star Trek – The Next Generation, the front of the car stretched towards the sky and elongated as I rocketed forwards. How that manifests itself on track leads towards a very odd driving style. At my favorite track, Lime Rock Park, for example, in the Turbo S you need to be on throttle when you should be off throttle. Otherwise, if you wait for the car to be where you would normally hit the throttle, you’re halfway down the straight. The best example of where this odd throttle usage comes into play is in “Big Bend”. A decreasing radius corner, if you nail the throttle after the first apex, normally you’d spear straight off the road. The last thing you want to do when those front tires need to bite in a car with 250 horsepower is lift the nose up. But when you nail the throttle in the 944 Turbo, it doesn’t have 250 horsepower. It has 10. Maybe 12. So, you plant the throttle, turn in and as you’re about to hit the apex BAM, the boost comes on, helping to rotate the rear end and you can throttle out of the corner. Perhaps it was Porsche’s way of imparting 911 “don’t lift” DNA into the front engine turbocharged wonder! Regardless of how you drive it, though, these 944 Turbos make great friends for track adventures:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 2007 Porsche Cayman S

Yesterday, our editor Paul sent me a quick message with a link enclosed – “Enjoy a late birthday present!” he said. The link was to the movie Le Mans, the 1971 classic staring Steve McQueen piloting the equally iconic Gulf-liveried John Wyer run Porsche 917Ks. But while that combination would be emblazoned in history as the defacto color for the Porsche 917, to me the more memorable combination was the car that actually won the 1971 Le Mans 24 Hours. That was the magnesium-framed number 22; a pale white car that debuted an equally iconic combination for me as it was sponsored by Martini Racing. Later in the 1970s, the livery would become more famous as the multiple winners with both 935 and 936 chassis, but few remember that the connection went back into the era of the light-blue Gulf cars. The Martini livery is still popular today, carried on by a proud tradition into Formula 1 as well as being recreated by amateur enthusiasts in the Porsche Interseries, a Cayman-only race program that notably offered drivers to run famous Porsche colors. Very few can afford the opportunity to even see 917s in action – never mind own one. But a Cayman S racer? While not cheap, they’re considerably more affordable than you’d expect:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Cayman S on eBay

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Motorsport Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing Tribute – REVISIT

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One of my favorite cars from last year wasn’t necessarily everyone else’s favorite; but that’s what makes this hobby interesting to me – that we don’t all like the same things. Truth be told, I prefer the more conventional RSR cars, but this 1971 911 RSR “Mary Stuart” Martini inspired car is pretty spectacular in its individuality. It’s floated around a few sites and is now up on Ebay with a “Buy It Now” price $30,000 less than last fall when I originally wrote it up. To be honest, it’s still priced high in my mind, but if you like the look and want a turn-key race car that will be sure to be fast and test your skills, this RSR tribute is a good option:

The below post originally appeared on our site September 9, 2013:

I think I’ve made it pretty clear that I think Martini Racing colors are just awesome. Some people insist everything looks better in “Gulf Blue”, but for me, it’s those Martini stripes that made some of the best looking race cars (and in a very few cases, even improved road cars). Case in point is today’s example; perhaps one of the strangest downforce attempts of the 1970s on a Porsche – the Mary Stuart tailed Martini Racing RSR. While a neat design in some ways, it certainly looks odd from other angles. Today’s 1971 911 is a recreation of the original, but you can’t deny that it looks fantastic in the proper Martini Racing colors of the 1973 RSR:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 911 RSR Martini Racing replica on Ebay

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Afternoon Accessories: Momo Martini Racing Steering Wheel

Martini Racing stripes make the world a better place, no matter where they appear. However, today’s application is something really special to put your unique project over the top. Martini Racing licensed MOMO to make a run of both street and racing competition steering wheels. These wheels were rare and expensive when new, though obviously cherished by at least a few owners and can be found for sale today. This particular model is a racing variant which sported a smaller diameter and quick-release ready bolt circle. In just about perfect shape, it’s just awaiting it’s next race:

Year: N/A
Model: MOMO Martini Racing
Condition: Used
Price: $499 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: MOMO Martini Racing Steering Wheel on eBay

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Motorsport Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing replica

I think I’ve made it pretty clear that I think Martini Racing colors are just awesome. Some people insist everything looks better in “Gulf Blue”, but for me, it’s those Martini stripes that made some of the best looking race cars (and in a very few cases, even improved road cars). Case in point is today’s example; perhaps one of the strangest downforce attempts of the 1970s on a Porsche – the Mary Stuart tailed Martini Racing RSR. While a neat design in some ways, it certainly looks odd from other angles. Today’s 1971 911 is a recreation of the original, but you can’t deny that it looks fantastic in the proper Martini Racing colors of the 1973 RSR:

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Year: 1971
Model: 911
Engine: 2.7 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $165,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 911 RSR Martini Racing replica on racecars.com

Description

This is a 1971 Porsche 911 race car that has been restored to be a replica of a 1973 Porsche Martini Racing RSR. The tub is 100% rust free. The engine is a 2.7 with RS pistons and race cams. The transmission is a 915 with limited slip. After finding the person that built and owned the car it was discovered that this car was replicated from a original 1973 Martini RSR. We were told that the panel are made from one of the original Mary Stuart cars. This car is all 1970’s. the front has Bilstein coil over struts,aluminium S calipers and ajustable sway bar. All body panels are fiber glass. the rear panels are removable. No side windows,wipers or head lights. The engine is a very reliable track engine. At this time there are about eight hours of Porsche Club Drivers Education on the car. The car is fast and is very fun to drive. We are open to offers.
History
none avalible

Performance Data

Weight: 1980 lbs

Engine

Engine Builder: Porsche
Manufacturer: Porsche
Type: 911
Displacement: 2.7
Horsepower: 225
Induction: Webbers
Heads: Porsche
Block: Porsche
Pistons: 2.7 RS
Total Time: 2 hours

Fuel System

Fuel Cell
Manufacturer: ATL
Age: unknown
Capacity: 15 Gal
Fuel Pump: Holley

Transmission

Manfacturer: Porsche
Type: 915

Body

Construction: Fiberglass
Color: Silver
Condition: new

Interior

Color/Finish: black
Fire System: none
Guages: VDO

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Anytime the numbers are sub 2,000 lbs and over 200 hp, you’re guaranteed to have fun. While not as potent as the original RSR and running a more subdued 2.7 power plant, this car will be certainly much cheaper to run. Add to that the fact that the price of the original is a million dollar plus car, and running a replica makes a lot more sense. This car wouldn’t likely be eligible to run in vintage events, but would certainly draw a crowd at local Porsche Club Racing events, or you could blow everyone’s mind at your local club Driver’s Education. Older 911 race cars aren’t cars for beginners, but aren’t to be quite as feared as their reputation, either – sticky rubber helps keep them planted.

In regards to value, a normal 2.7 race car would struggle to bring $50,000, even if it was a clean car. Like the 1974 RSR replica I wrote up a few weeks ago, the value in this car is in the build – though I think this car is relying a bit too much on the paint and unique tail carrying the value. All in all, I really like the 1974 car was a better, cleaner build with more speed potential for around the same money. It wouldn’t be very hard to add the Martini stripes to that car, either. But, if you really must stand out from the crowd, why not do it with the craziest duck tail ever?

-Carter

1977 Porsche 924 Martini Racing Championship Limited Edition

Back in July, I reviewed a 1978 Porsche 924 Limited Edition that was for sale for $3,700. To me, that car looked to be a fantastic deal. Sure, the 924 is the red-headed step-child of Porsche, but it was a clean and original driver for under $4,000. Hard to beat that in Porsche terms! Today, I found another “Limited Edition” 924 from 1977. In true Porsche form, they sure managed to make a lot of special editions of the 924! This car is one of the slightly less rare Martini Racing Championship edition cars, of which there were 3,000 produced. While the 1978 car was understated in silver, this 1977 shouts out its sporting connections with some pretty fantastic side stripes and a wild interior:

Year: 1977
Model: 924 Martini Racing Limited Edition
Engine: 2.0 liter inline-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 34,000 mi
Price: $7,999 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini Racing Edition on eBay

PORSCHE 924 SPECIAL EDITION
***********************************
MARTINI RACING CHAMPIONSHIP LIMITED EDITION!

EXCELLENT CONDITION! LOW MILES!
~FUN TO DRIVE~
**********

Comes with Certificate of Authenticity & An Original 1977 Print Advertisement

This car has been babied! It has never seen a flake of snow!!!

**********

“The first limited-edition 924 was labeled the Martini Edition and factory order number M426. Also known as the Championship Edition, it was a celebration vehicle of Porsches racing triumphs. It was distinguished by front and rear sway bars, leather covered steering wheel, red-white-blue Martini Rossi striped on the outside and on the headrests, white alloy rims, black vinyl seats, and red carpet. The vehicles were built from December 1976 through March 1977.”

–conceptcarz.com

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I can’t say that this car really looks to be in mint condition. Clean, yes, but not near-spotless like the 1978 silver car. Perhaps that’s the fault of the photos, or perhaps the car just is a bit tired. I love the side stripes and the color matched wheels, but I can’t say that I’m a fan of tribute cars (even from the factory) without real sporting credentials. Sure, the sway bars are a nice addition, but this was mostly an appearance package – the antithesis of Martini Racing. Miles are low, but not museum low, so this is a driver – but at one dollar short of $8,000, I can’t see how this car is more than twice the 1978 I reviewed. That car was appropriately priced and shown; this car seems to be carrying a 100 percent plus premium, in my opinion. It comes with a certificate of authenticity if you needed it (do people fake these cars?), so perhaps it’s ready for someone to take to their local Porsche show for a few trips down memory lane. It’s hard to find these for sale and in decent shape these days, and despite the premium, it’s undoubtedly the cheapest Martini Porsche you can buy.

-Carter