2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed

Back in 2021 I took a look at a bit of a rare package – it bordered on “didn’t know you could still get those” level. Strange, but true – manual gearboxes were being phased out of Audi’s lineup much more quickly than BMW. So it was a treat to find an A4 with a 6-speed manual:

2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed

As I explained in that post, by 2011 you could get the A4 in either Avant or sedan, front-drive or quattro, with only the 2.0T rated at 211 horsepower. Like the 2021 car, today’s example is also a manual and also has the 18″ Sport Package, which gave you eponymous 18″ wheels, sport suspension, and front sport seats. This one also has some go-fast goodies, and it still looks pretty modern for an 11-year-old car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Audi A4 2.0T quattro 6-Speed on eBay

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1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant

Though it was instantly recognizable as an Audi, the all-new-for-’92 C4 bore little resemblance to the boxy C3 it replaced. Fluid lines and curves dominated the design, while new running gear and motors made a splash in performance. The C4 continued to stress Audi’s pioneering aerodynamic tradition, but the result this time was a car which seemed far less top-heavy than the chassis it replaced. It looked more trim even if it was a bit bigger than the outgoing model.

On the fly, the 100’s new motivation was a revelation. The 2.8 liter V6 replaced the 2.3 liter inline-5, and though horsepower was only 172 and torque 184, both figures represented a nearly 30% gain over the 5-pot. New, too, was a 4-speed automatic transmission. And while the inside looked little different from the last of the C3, only switchgear was shared and the C4 brought a host of new safety and convenience features to the large-chassis Audi.

Strange, though, was the re-appearance of Audi’s earlier naming convention in the US. Back in the early days of the 5000, Audi had used the “S” and “CS” monikers to denote turbo and quattro models at times (but, again being Audi, inconsistently). Well, the S and CS were back after a four-year hiatus. Base model 100 came with steel wheels, while the “S” model stepped you up in options and gave you alloys. But outside of the 20V turbo S4 model, the 100 to get was still the 100CS, which was the most loaded and gave you the option for Audi’s quattro drivetrain. Fully loaded, they were around $35,000 – not cheap, but also not the most expensive in class, and were still pretty unique in offering all-wheel drive. But like the C3, the front-drive 100/100S/100CS outsold the quattro model by a fair margin and are more common to find still kicking today. Audi claims they traded just 2,230 of the new 100CS quattro in 1992, only portion of which were wagons, so let’s take a peek at this Avant:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 100CS quattro Avant on eBay

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1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

With only around 1,700 imported over 30 years ago, your odds running across an Audi Coupe Quattro any day of the week are…well, exceedingly low. With a sweet 7A 20V inline-5 under the hood, robust build quality, just enough creature comforts, and Audi’s legendary quattro all-wheel-drive system underneath you, there’s a lot to like if you do find one. I took a look at a nice example back in December:

1990 Audi Coupe Quattro

It was not for the faint of heart, with bidding in the mid-teens. Today’s example is a bit more affordable, if you’re looking for one of these:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on eBay

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1993 BMW M5

BMW’s second-generation M5 followed the same recipe as the outgoing E28; manual transmission, rear-drive, howling inline-6 under the hood. But the E34 was far from a copy of the car that was really credited with being the first super sedan. BMW upped with power first with the 3.6-liter version of the S38; though the increase in displacement was a scant 82 ccs, the result was impressive. BMW Motorsport GmbH fit a new cam, a higher compression head, and a new engine management system to yield 311 horsepower at a rev-busting 6,900 rpm.

While the E34 M5 was available on these shores far longer than the E28, there weren’t a ton imported – especially towards the end of the run. Today’s example is a beauty, too, in Calypso Red with M System II “throwing stars”. While it’s no spring chicken, to me it still represents good value in today’s market:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 BMW M5 on eBay

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2011 Audi Q7 3.0 TDi

The price of used (and I mean USED) Cayennes got you down? Well, there was always the corporate partner Audi’s similar rig – the Q7. The more sedate look of the Q7 is equally as polarizing and it was less geared towards sport than the Porsche, but it’s still a comfortable people hauler – especially with that third row, and you could opt for a 3.0 TDi, as well. Of course, they were also wrapped in the emissions scandal, but today’s semi-rare Q7 diesel has already gone through the emissions correction program. It also has a lot less mileage than the Porsche, and for good measure it’s cheaper, too:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Audi Q7 3.0 TDi on eBay

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2016 Audi TTS Coupe Quattro Exclusive

Twenty years ago, the Audi TTS would have been a very exciting proposition. Built on the universally praised MQB platform, the third generation 8S TT is lighter than the original, better balanced, and more powerful. With close to 300 horsepower and 280 lb.ft of torque from the 2.0 TSFI turbocharged inline-4, it’s a Golf R in a slinky dinner dress. Equipped with the impressive dual-clutch 6-speed S-Tronic transmission and launch control, the results are hard to argue with: 0-60 in 4.2 seconds and a quarter mile in 12.8 at 108 mph. Unthinkable for anything but the most exotic exotics a few generations ago, this is all wrapped up in a reasonably affordable and attractive package that is usable year-round and has few drawbacks.

But the TTS falls into a no man’s land today. It’s $10,000 more expensive than the base TT – already quite an impressive car. It’s also more expensive than the more practical Golf R on which it is based. A lot more expensive. But more troubling, with a few options like today’s it is also dearer than a base Porsche 718 Cayman. And while it soundly out-drags the base Cayman, which would you rather impress friends in? That means, however, that you can get them more affordably today than some similar-performing cars, so let’s look at today’s example – which made its way through Audi’s Exclusive department and came out the other side in Porsche’s Riviera Blue. It looks great!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Audi TTS Exclusive on eBay

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1988 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

This neat Scirocco is listed as selling on 2/20/22 for $17,700.

After a string of Corrados and one very cool early Scirocco, it’s nice to see a great example of the second-generation VW water-cooled coupe. There isn’t a ton of time left on this auction, and it looks like it’s going to sell – which, given the appearance of it, is no surprise. This white ’88 model is lowered and looks menacing with high-polished BBS RC wheels and Euro-spec goodies. Despite higher mileage, this one looks great – and bids have reacted:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on eBay

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1993 Audi V8 4.2 quattro

How rare is it to find a US-spec V8 4.2 quattro? Well, to put it into some perspective, I don’t think that there is anyone on the internet that writes about V8 quattros more than I do, and the last time I looked at a US 4.2 was in 2018. Yep, that rare.

1993 Audi V8 quattro

Audi sold some 2,823 1990 models between late 89 and the end of the model year. Another 527 ’91s were imported. But the 92-up models, which had the 4.2 and light revisions to the interior as well as conventional G60 brakes? Those were scarce when new. Audi sold 270 92s, 170 ’93s, 77 ’94s, and a single model left a dealership as an act of defiance in 1995. Yep, that’s it. Jut 518 were sold in the US, putting it on the rarity scale of models like the BMW M1 (453 produced). And since it wasn’t a BMW M1, but a large German executive sedan that was reasonably complicated, they fell off the radar pretty quickly as the original owners traded them in on the next best thing, while downstream owners struggled to keep the relatively unknown model going. I certainly fell into that camp; owning a just 11-year-old 1993 model at the time, it should have been pretty nice – but in comparison, my now 13-year-old 135i is far more reliable. Car technology changed a lot during that period, as did the availability of parts. Quite a few V8s also gave their lives for others; the motors were popular upgrades for the earlier and more desirable manual models, for example. Yet here we are, with a running V8 quattro from 1993 for sale…so let’s take a look!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Audi V8 4.2 quattro on eBay

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1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60

Crazy about Corrados? I’ve got you covered! Hot off the heels of yesterday’s Euro 16V Corrado comes the obvious counterpoint; the US-market G60. After all, why pay more for a less powerful model when the supercharged variant was available here? Well, as I mentioned in that listing, there are several details that are neat to see and desirable about the models that weren’t available here. Still, this particular Nugget Yellow G60 looks pretty awesome, has much better non-original wheels, and is off-the-bat cheaper. So let’s take a look!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60 on eBay

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1993 Volkswagen Corrado 16V

Back in 2020, I took a look at a European-market Corrado G60. While it was pretty similar to the North American-specification drivetrain, there were subtle differences that set it apart from the US versions:

Euro-Spec 24k-Mile 1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60

Today we’re looking at a Corrado that also hails from Europe, but this one is quite different. Pop the hood and you’ll find not a supercharged G60 or a 2.8-liter VR6, but in fact the 9A 2.0-liter 16V we saw in the GTI, GLI, and Passat. Let’s take a look!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Volkswagen Corrado 16V on eBay

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