1984 Audi 4000S Quattro

While the Quattro stole all of the headlines for Audi, the reality is that it was an expensive vehicle at the time – very expensive. As a halo car for Audi, the purchase price of the Quattro was around $35,000 in 1983 – more money that most of the competition that was, at least on paper, faster. Remember, a 1983 Porsche 911 coupe would have only set you back around $32,000 at the time. It was, then, the Audi R8 of its day, and like the R8 it had a limited market. Audi’s solution to the problem was to take all of the underpinnings – virtually unchanged – and pop them into the more pedestrian 80 platform. Marked as the 4000S quattro in the U.S., it developed as a legend in its own right, with a carved-from-granite drivetrain that seemed unbreakable and great handling. True, at the best part of 2800 pounds but with only 115 horsepower, it won no drag races, but the versatile small sedan took the Audi fanbase to new levels. It was, in many respects, the Audi S4 of its day. The interior and exterior received substantial upgrades for the 1985 model year, making the first year model a one-year stand that has many fans. They’re rare cars to see today, especially in great condition:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi 4000S quattro on eBay

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Heap of the Week 2: 1983 Audi Quattro

The Quattro remains one of the few attainable halo vehicles from the 1980s. Consider the others; BMW M1s are on the verge of being million dollar cars while most of the rest of the M line appreciates rapidly. For Mercedes-Benz, there were no real “Halo” models for the 1980s in the U.S., but clean and original examples of their flagship models or indeed some of the rare AMG pieces are big business. Porsche has several, with the 930 and good examples of just about every other rear engined example rapidly increasing in value. What’s left? The Quattro should certainly be considered amongst those cars, for one. As a revolutionary piece of engineering, the Quattro firmly placed Audi on the map as a serious contender in the European and North American markets. The were legendary even before they officially raced, as one of the stage cars notoriously outpaced all of the race cars in its first unofficial appearance at a rally. The rest set the stage for the legend; the Quattro amassed 23 WRC victories and two World Championship titles before Audi moved towards road racing with the demise of Group B. Today, despite the top-tier reputation and recognition that it finally deserves, the Quattro remains an affordable option for classic German motoring:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro on eBay

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1984 Audi Quattro

To me, it’s pretty amazing that the Quattro hasn’t really received the attention of the E30 M3. The Quattro beat the M3 to the market by 6 years with its squared, chunky boxflare stance. It was all-wheel drive, turbocharged and cutting edge. It revolutionized the World Rally Championship and firmly cemented Audi in the halls of motorsports and enthusiasts minds. The offbeat 5-cylinder hanging in front of the wheels seemed an odd choice, but Audi has returned with an updated version of that power plant in some of its newer models, and the sound and performance is no less memorable than it was in the original. Indeed, in terms of what a single car did for a brand, the Quattro was much more influential for Audi than the E30 M3 was for BMW in my mind. Yet today, if you want to get a great condition E30 M3 with under 100,000 miles you’re looking at over $50,000 to play; if you want to get into the original Quattro, nice examples can be had for half that amount:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi Quattro on eBay

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1983 Audi Quattro

Well, he’s at it again; the same seller as the 1984 Audi 4000S quattro in Laguna Seca Blue and earlier 1990 Coupe Quattro in Ginster Yellow is now selling his 1983 Quattro. These cars have been pretty rapidly appreciating, pulled upwards by the popularity of the E30 M3 and resurgence of Audi’s campaign to recognize that it made cars before the A4. Undoubtedly, this Quattro is much more valuable than the last two offerings from this seller – but is it the one to buy? The last few examples that we’ve seen have had some rare but polarizing modifications that arguably hurt more than helped the value of the cars for sale – is this legend the same?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro on eBay

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Motorsport Monday: 1968 Porsche 912 Rally

There are few things to me that are quite as cool as the factory rally cars. For a long period of time – indeed, until the mid 1980s, works rally cars really differed very little from the production cars. Compared to their track-racing equivalents, there was something more realistic about rally cars compared to the quite extreme measures manufacturers went through to make circuit cars. Perhaps part of that nature was because the big money wasn’t really in the rally scene until much more recently, but whatever the cause you got plenty of action from cars that you could conceivably buy, modify and race. While in many ways a bit of an unlikely candidate, Porsche actually managed to front several cars up through and into the 1980s in World Rally Championship events, but many more were entered by privateers. Such is the case with today’s rally find, a 1968 Porsche 912:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Rally on Pelican Parts

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Motorsport Monday: 1970 Saab 96 Rally Car

Wondering what a SAAB 96 is doing here? Well, here’s a little known fact: the vaunted Audi Quattro won Rally Monte Carlo once; the SAAB 96 won it twice. But there was not much snow there, you say? Okay, how about Rally Sweden, where the 96 equaled the Quattro’s 4 victories? Still not convinced? How about the RAC Rally in Great Britain? Sure, the Audi won it three years on the trot – 1981, 1982 and 1983 – but then, so did the SAAB, in 1960, 1961 and 1962, with two more victories that followed. But great names drove the Audi, you say. Names like Stig Blomqvist Per Ekland, perhaps? Yup, they drove for the Swedes, too. But beyond the wins, there was something that was just neat and quirky about the 96; an idea that would see evolution right through the takeover of SAAB by General Motors. They always did things differently, and you know what? It worked, and we liked it, so today let’s look at a Swedish neighbor:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1970 Saab 96 Rally on eBay

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1983 Audi Quattro – REVISIT

Last October, I wrote up a few different Quattros, and this Gobi Beige model was one of them. Sacrificing some originality in favor or reliability and drivability, it appears well modified and ready for its next driver. The price for this gold goodness is high for 10V non-original Quattros at $21,500, which explains the lack of sale, but the car is well modified and you could easily spend $5,000-$6,000 on a lesser example trying to get it sorted. As the market continues to head up on these rally legends, this car starts to make more and more sense!

The below post originally appeared on our site October 23, 2013:

-Carter

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Party Like It’s 1989 Week: 1989 Audi Quattro

It’s hard to remember that there was a time before the M3 and the 944, but before they rocked their flares into the collective consciousness of every school aged and school aged-acting boy there was the Quattro. For as the 944 brought Le Mans development and the M3 brought Touring Car development to the street, the Quattro was born in the fire-breathing World Rally Championship. The technology that filtered down created a extremely competent GT car; it wasn’t the fastest around a given corner, it wasn’t the fastest in a straight line, but it would be the fastest all year long. By 1989, though, the B2 chassis had been retired in favor of the new B3 – complete with a new Coupe. But Audi didn’t retire the Quattro without a bit of fanfare just yet; for 1989 the car was upgraded with a development of the Group B Sport Quattro motor now sporting 20 valves and electronic fuel injection. The motor is now as legendary as the car, and the combination of the two created perhaps the best all-around GT car of the 1980s; the “RR” Quattro.

A veritable highlight show of the line, the last of the run 1989-1991 Quattros featured the 20V motor, the chunky looks and box flares of the original covering the best 8″ wheels (okay, the Sport got 9″ wheels made from unobtanium), better suspension, ABS, smarter-on-the-road Torsen center differential, painted body color spoilers and the flush-mounted H1/H4 lights, new better steering wheel, the revised later dashboard – and of course, the best digital dashboard. What did all of this make? Arguably, the best Quattro, of course!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Audi Quattro 20V on Mobile.de

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1983 Audi Quattro

Plenty has been said on this page and others about the now legendary status of the original Quattro, so if you’re looking for a history lesson it won’t be here. However, what the quattro does represent is great collector value in comparison to contemporary 911s and slightly later E30 M3s; a unique car with plenty of character that took the automotive world on a different path. Quattro values have been steadily increasing over the past several years, and while they are hard to find on these shores in good condition for sale they do come up from time to time. The last 1983 Quattro we featured had lost some of its originality in favor of driveability; today’s car retains some of that originality and shows well in Tornado Red:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro on eBay

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1983 Audi Quattro

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It’s been a Quattro kind of month at GCFSB. Perhaps that’s because our editor, Paul, put me in the driver’s seat and I like Audis a whole lot, but there have also been some great examples that have popped up for sale recently. First was a clean and rare Stone Grey Metallic 1985 Quattro, then our reader ride 20V turbo Quattro in Mars Red, followed by the splendid rally-prepped but unconventional RS4 powered Quattro. Today is another modified Quattro, but this one is a bit less extreme. I was initially excited to see this car pop up a few weeks ago, but there were no good photos and the car was removed. Well, it’s back, this time with good photos to show us one of the signature colors for the Quattro – Gobi Beige over Chocolate leather:

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Year: 1983
Model: Quattro
Engine: 2.2 liter turbocharged inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 121,148 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Audi Quattro on eBay

My humblest apologies to all who viewed this ad previously. Much to my embarrassment, the pictures were wholly inadequate and failed to give anyone seriously considering the car a chance to fairly examine it. Hopefully the new improved and larger photos will give you a better idea.Once again, my sincerest apologies. Gobi Beige with dark chocolate brown leather interior. 120K original miles. The car has resided in Nevada, Washington and California. I am the third owner. Original turbo, Euro headlights and pushed in bumpers, newer 1987 slanted grill update the look of this car and subtly shave few a few years off its appearance. Ronal alloy wheels, lowered full 2Bennett adjustable coil over suspension and performance chip has transformed this beauty from an antiquated tractor to a fully modern car with rally like handling. Brakes have been upgraded with slotted rotors and A4 calipers. All belts (including timing belt) CV joints and hoses were replaced a couple of years ago with little mileage since. AC works but needs to be recharged. The interior is in nice condition, upgraded later model dash and 2Bennett instrument binnacle with turbo boost, oil pressure and water temperature gauges allow you to monitor and keep track of your car as you are driving in varying conditions. All electrical relays have been beefed up with the addition of the stronger euro headlights. A toggle switch that can manually activate the radiator fan when the engine temperature goes up on those hot summer days and turbo timer have also been added. This car to my knowledge has never been raced. When I first purchased the car I had hopes of some day driving on the track after witnessing these cars eat all of their competition alive at the Long beach Grand Prix in 1983. Alas after purchasing this car in 2000, while in good condition, it took a number more years and a lot more money to bring this car in to the modern age. (I am not a mechanic) My goal was to drive and enjoy the car when and where I pleased and make it as bullet proof and modern as possible with out destroying its pedigree. To this end I believe I have attained this goal. Many UR Quattros that are still on the road have been highly modified. Mine has been modernized to be a reliable and drivable car. Always garaged and professionally maintained. Have most of the receipts documenting the history of this car since I assumed ownership.

Buyer responsible for vehicle pickup or arrangement & cost of shipping. $500.00 deposit required 48 hours after winning bid, 72 hours if winning bid is over a weekend. Full payment due at car pickup. All payments to be made via deposit to Paypal.

2Bennett is pretty famous for building some incredible Quattros, and while this isn’t one of their most outrageous creations it appears well modified. The coil over setup is similar to what I use in my GT and well engineered. The car’s electrics have also been upgraded and the car was chipped, helping both dependability and performance. The dash and grill have been updated to later designs which look quite clean, though a nice set of Euro bumper covers would really complete the look with those H1/H4 Euro lights. All of this has been done to make the car a solid driver, which it appears to be. The only downside is the typical “A/C needs a recharge” line, but it’s nice that the system is in tact as many pull it during modifications. Value has been all over the map on these Quattros as of late; the 1985 was well bought at $15,000 but the 20V Quattro was even a better deal sneaking in under $10,000. Bidding is already strong on this well-presented example; as of writing it has reached $10,000 with 6 days to go. Even at $15,000, these 10V Quattros are a steal compared to what E30 M3s are bringing in value. We’ll have to watch the final value on this car but it may reach the high end of the 10V Turbo market on these cars!

-Carter