1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

Sand Beige is one of those Porsche colors that I can never really decide how I feel about it. Like quite a few of Porsche’s vintage colors I know I don’t care much for it on a modern 911, but on the long-hood 911 there is something about it that looks right. The chrome accents presumably play a large role here, but I think the taller shape of the car itself plays a role as well. That said, I wouldn’t call it one of my favorites by any stretch, but I can see the appeal. Here, on this 1969 Porsche 911S with 90,115 miles on it, I think it looks pretty good! It’s an unusual color, but not garish, and I could totally see where it might fit right into the landscape of the mountains and deserts of the southwest U.S. with their myriad variations of red, orange, and brown scenery.

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Year: 1969
Model: 911S
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 90,115 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

This is a matching number 1969 Porsche 911S that has undergone a comprehensive mechanical and cosmetic restoration spanning two years. As per the Certificate of authenticity, the car is finished in sand beige, paint code 6807, with tan leatherette. Here are some of the highlights: -Body: Car disassembled, paint stripped, repaired or replaced with factory parts as necessary. Replacement lenses and lights. -Engine: Dismantled, cleaned, machined. Built from the crankshaft up using Porsche factory parts, J&E 9.8:1 pistons. Mechanical fuel injection, stacks, butterflies refurbished. SSI heat exchangers. All surfaces, brackets dry stripped and powder coated, plated, new hardware throughout. Every hose, line, cable has been replaced throughout the car. -Transmission: Replaced all synchros, 1st and 3rd gears. Replaced all shift bushings, removed and repaired/rebuilt pedal box assembly.

Ossi Blue 1969 Porsche 912 Targa

Ossi Blue 1969 Porsche 912 Targa

I have somewhat dueling interests in this Ossi Blue 1969 Porsche 912 Targa. I’m hoping we can return to some sanity in the 912 market; to find those examples that remain reflective of the nice values for which the 912 previously had been known. In their day these were great cars to drive capable of even rivaling their more prestigious bigger brother, the 911. Early reports actually suggested they were better handling given their more balanced weight distribution. Among modern machinery a 912 isn’t likely to knock your socks off, but their no-frills light weight still should be capable of providing hands-on joy. My other interest is in how the 912 market is about to shake out and whether we are suddenly going to see more interesting examples come up for auction. The reason? Last weekend this Bahama Yellow 912 sold for over $114K. It was a somewhat stunning sale.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Ossi Blue 1969 Porsche 912 Targa on eBay

Year: 1969
Model: 912 Targa
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 85,000 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

Hello and thank you for viewing my auction I’m selling my 1969 Porsche 912 Targa rust free restored in its original color ossi blue with upgraded tan ricardo racing seats it is powered by its original motor engine code 4095164 1600cc 86k miles that was rebuilt 2years ago dual carburetors K&n filters runs and handles great with no problems at all upgraded 4wheel power disk brakes it is a 4speed manual transmission that shifts smooth also fresh tune up 500miles ago very nice exterior and interior very straight body all the way around could use headlight rings re chromed also have original car jack and tools and owners manual and original maintenance record book form 1969 it is a very nice driver gets thumbs up and looks wherever you go so bid with confidence for your chance to own a true piece of european history please do not bid if your are not planning to buy serious inquires only thanks hate to sell but making room in collection …..

1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

You might of heard the story of the Colorado man who had a little affinity for Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3s. (You can read the story here if not.) I understand where this man was coming from because if you really like something, go get four more of them. In his case, the M100 powered W109 just happened to do it for him and I don’t blame him one bit. Now that all five of these 6.3s have been saved and rejuvenated, one of them is up for adoption. Unfortunately, though, the adoption fee is quite steep.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on Hemmings

Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Every time I see a car that is usually expensive, selling for a price that is inexplicably inexpensive, the gears in my head start turning. Could I buy this one on the cheap, fix it up and perhaps not lose money on it? Better yet – could I buy it, not do a thing, let it sit and probably not lose money on it? Thank goodness I physically can’t fit another vehicle in my garages and driveway because when I see cars like today’s, those damn gears start moving.

The W109 300SEL 6.3 has quickly become a collector car that everyone in the Mercedes circles are rushing to snag up. Prices have been going up at an alarming rate thanks to folks like Jay Leno proclaiming his love for it.  I understand where he’s coming from because the 6.3, in my opinion, is one of the finest sedans Mercedes has ever made. It’s also generally considered one of the first “super sedans” – the prototype for not only later AMG models, but cars like the M5. Sticking the M100 V8 into the handsome W109 body and building it to a standard of above average durability and reliability made this car a winner the day it left the factory. The only problem was all the greatness is that it costs a lot of money upfront and even more to maintain at a reasonable level. This is where some solid math skills and judging your mechanical ability come into play when deciding whether to take the plunge on a project like this 1969 6.3 up for bid in Eastern, Pennsylvania.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Soft-window Targa – 1 of 12

1969 Porsche 911E Soft-window Targa – 1 of 12

There are some colors that if you showed me the swatch for it I would never consider it on a car. Then when I actually see it on a car I’m blown away. This color, which I’m fairly sure is Lindgrün and they’ve called Golden Lime Green, fits that bill perfectly. This isn’t the first 911 I’ve seen in this color, but every one I’ve come across has blown me away even though the color itself I would never think I’d enjoy. It’s still probably not for everyone, but I really like it here. And there’s more to this 911E than just the color. It’s one of the rare Soft-window Targas built for the ’69 MY, making it one of the few to possess the longer wheelbase that Porsche introduced for the 911 in 1969. While Porsche had begun soft-window production in 1967 it quickly was replaced by the hard window with which we’re all very familiar. The design is pretty quirky and provides a number of variations of enjoying your open-top driving. By 1969 very few soft windows were being produced and it was now an option rather than a distinct model. This makes coming up with firm production numbers difficult. The seller states that this is 1 of 12 911E in this configuration, a number that appears in an article of Road & Track though I’m not exactly sure from where the number originally was sourced. I’ve seen other numbers quoted in auctions, but all are close to this so we can at least know it’s a rare machine.

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1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

Excellence Magazine ran a recent article on the 1969 911S as possibly the best of the early long-hood 911s. There wasn’t really an extensive argument for that claim, but rather it served as a reasonable introduction to the 911 upon which the article was intended to focus. Regardless of whether we feel the ’69 model year was the best, it was important as it was the year Porsche extended the wheelbase across the entire 911 line bringing to these cars greater dynamic stability and, at least to my eye, better looks. As tends to happen, I then came across a nice looking 911S and figured the fates must have aligned for me to feature it. So here we have a Burgundy 1969 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in New York, with a Tan interior and wonderful houndstooth inserts in the seats. It has undergone a full restoration though everything is said to be in its original colors and spec (I assume the steering wheel is not original).

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1969 Mercedes-Benz L408 G Auxiliary Fire Van

1969 Mercedes-Benz L408 G Auxiliary Fire Van

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During my searches around the internet for cool cars, every once in awhile I run across an ex-utility vehicle that catches my eye. This is one of those vehicles. A 1969 Mercedes-Benz L408 G Auxiliary Fire Van. Originally commissioned for Fire Department of Heide in Northern Germany, this van has all the pros of owning a fire vehicle without all the cons of owning a fire truck — most notably finding a place to park it. So let’s take a deeper look at this cool old van up for sale in Santa Barbara, California.

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1969 Volkswagen Beetle

1969 Volkswagen Beetle

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This 1969 Volkswagen Beetle for sale in California is one of those cars from my youth. For the first few years of my life, my father drove a 1967 Beetle in this same shade of Java Green. It wasn’t in particularly good shape or all that exciting, but it was certainly more reliable than the Fiat 131 2-door that shared the garage at the time. That was a car which drove my parents into the arms of reliable Hondas for almost two decades. The 1967 Beetle which my father drove was one of the last classic Beetles, albeit upgraded with a 12 volt electrical system and larger 1.5 liter engine along with safety items such as reversing lamps and sealed beam headlights. The following year would transform the Beetle closer to its final form from the 1970s era. For 1968, there were many improvements, such as an electronic fuel gauge, ventilation system and improved shifter, along with new safety features such as larger bumpers and integrated front seat head restraints. This 1968 Beetle for sale in California is coming off a fresh restoration.

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1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

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There is a reason why Jay Leno calls the W109 6.3 his favorite Mercedes-Benz. It’s a classic Mercedes design both inside and out then finished off with the M100 6.3 liter V8 that still holds it own with modern cars. It’s what a Mercedes-Benz should be. Don’t get me wrong, I love the new super AMG cars that have 650 horsepower and can drive themselves down the road, but you can get that from any brand now. In 1969, this was the car if you wanted a European super sedan. Not to mention you paid for it too at over $14,000, which was only a few thousand less than a Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. But the Silver Shadow didn’t compare to the 6.3 in terms of power, build quality and reliability. That’s why this car still has a huge following and even higher demand to this day. So let’s check out this 1969 for sale in Massachusetts.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

1969 Porsche 911S Targa

1969 Porsche 911S Targa

I feel like it’s been a while since I featured a long-hood 911 that was in original condition. Though not as aggressive and eye-catching as many of the modified and backdated 911s that we come across there still remains strong appeal to these early models. That is especially true of a 911S in a nice color. Of course, it is the very high values that these cars command which has encouraged so many owners of more recent models to backdate them in order to reproduce the original design aesthetic. Though the backdated models typically feature improved refinement and more modern mechanicals sometimes there’s just no substitute for the real thing. For the 1969 MY Porsche increased the wheelbase throughout the 911 range helping to provide a little more stability to the rear-engine rear-wheel design. Some buyers prefer the original short-wheelbase dynamics (and many collectors do), but I think many consider the change an improvement. Purely from an aesthetic standpoint the longer wheelbase creates a little better balance as the eye stretches a little more down the entire length of the car. Regardless of which side of that aisle you choose, it is the long-hood design itself that remains of paramount interest. The example we see here shows one of the better Porsche colors of this vintage: a Signal Yellow 1969 Porsche 911S Targa, located in Colorado, with a reported 39,060 miles on it (though the seller’s phrasing casts some doubt here and suggests the odometer may have rolled over).

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#FailFriday: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

#FailFriday: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

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It’s time again for Fail Friday! Welcoming you into July is a wonderfully horrible 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL. Normally I wouldn’t speak such ill of the great Pagoda but I can’t hold back on this one. It’s not an outrageous price or aftermarket exterior modifications that qualify it for Fail Friday, it’s the unspeakable acts of interior homicide that have been committed. Before you click the ”Continue reading this article →” I need you to be prepared as to what lies inside this SL.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280SL on Hemmings

1969 Porsche 912

1969 Porsche 912

We see a lot of cars whose sellers refer to them as time capsules. In most cases that refers to a reasonably well kept car that’s mostly original, but it’s certainly not something that would get us all hot and bothered about vintage aesthetics. In some cases those cars can be downright haggard; time capsules in the sense of simply being, well, old. There are rare cases, however, where the term seems to apply; a car that not only appears to be entirely original, but even looks in the sort of condition one would expect had they owned the car during the time in which it was for sale. This car might just fit that bill. Here is a Polo Red 1969 Porsche 912 Coupe, located in Tennessee, with just 20,945 miles on it. As with most “time capsule” automobiles we have arrived at this point through long-term storage, but unlike some barn finds that really do look like they’ve been sitting in a barn, this 912 presents extremely well. Much of that probably comes down to the work of those who brought it back to life after it came out of storage. Regardless, it’s said to have its original paint, original interior, along with all of its original parts.

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1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

1969 Porsche 911S Coupe

We all love to see a nice early 911S and the example here is of particular interest as it’s one of the very few I have come across in this sort of darker metallic red. I don’t know if this shade will be as popular as the pastel colors, especially those like pastel blue or tangerine, but I’m actually really surprised by how good this 911 looks in this color. The darker metallic blues have always shown well on the early 911 design and it appears that the same holds true for red. Here we have a nicely restored Dark Red Metallic 1969 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in Florida, with just over 300 miles on it since its restoration.

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1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa

1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa

Let’s check back in on my favorite quirky Porsche: the Soft-window Targa. As I’ve mentioned before, the Soft-window Targa was Porsche’s engineering solution to a problem they anticipated would occur, but never actually did. It’s sort of a window into the development process that even made it into production, if only for a short time. Because Porsche suspected that increasingly stringent safety regulations would render the cabriolet obsolete they sought to get out in front of these regulations and produce a model that would provide both the full open-cockpit feel of a convertible and also the safety of a fixed roll hoop. The Soft-window Targa was both an ingenious and somewhat ridiculous solution to that problem. I say ridiculous because to me these have never really looked right; they’ve always look like someone’s garage project, even if a well executed one. The idea did work, but Porsche quickly introduced the fixed hard-window version with which we are all familiar and the soft-window drifted off into the sunset. We do still see them from time to time and they are generally pretty popular with collectors due to their rarity and, I think, in part because of their interesting engineering. They certainly make for a fine talking piece. For whatever reason we’ve seen quite a few more examples of the 912 of late rather than the 911 and today is no different. Here we have a very pretty Irish Green 1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa, located in California, with what appears to be 109,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Targa – REVISIT

1969 Porsche 911E Targa – REVISIT

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The very eye-catching Signal Green 1969 Porsche 911E Targa we featured in early January remains up for sale. In our original feature the reserve on the auction was met and it seemed like sensible minds would prevail over previously failed auction attempts that did not meet the reserve. However, the seller ended the auction early and it appears there was no sale as it is now back up from the same seller. Bidding is now falling well short of its previous highs and well short of the seller’s asking price of $89,900. This is a wonderful example of one of these early pastel 911s, but the seller may need to blink.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Targa on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site January 7, 2016: