Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport

I have featured this car previously, but some cars are worth revisiting should they come up for sale again. This is truly one of those special cars. This is an Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport. Naturally, the Club Sport is a lightened factory Carrera with upgraded suspension and a modest boost in power. Weight savings came about through the typical means: remove basically all of the creature comforts along with the rear seats. Voila, 154 pounds lost! They also are very rare with only 340 produced worldwide from 1987-1989.

Of those 340, a mere 28 Club Sports came to the US market and this is the only example in Irish Green. (I’m not sure if it’s the only example worldwide in Irish Green. I suppose that depends on how we read that statement.) It has traveled a mere 9,311 miles during its 29 years of existence and I’m guessing none of those have been track miles. It looks absolutely phenomenal and is said to be entirely original. If you missed your chance at this very rare 911 last time, then here you have another shot at it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport on Excellence Magazine

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E Tommykaira M19

Update 3/6/18 – What appears to be this same car from July 2016 has appeared on San Francisco’s Craigslist with a $15,000 asking price but little more information. Thanks to our reader Jeff for the spot!

The last time you probably heard the term ‘Tommykaira’, it was ripping around a digital racetrack on Gran Turismo in the late 90s. The name Tommy Kaira was legendary in the JDM car scene in the 2000s with heavy hitter Nissan Skylines and even their own car that got them a place in the Gran Turismo video game series. But before becoming all that, they started off by dabbling in the world of Mercedes-Benz. They took the regular W201 190E and W124 300E and added their own speical touches to the engine, suspension, body work and wheels before reselling them to the Japanese market as the Tommykaira M19 and M30E . Very rarely do I see them for sale because of their relatively low production numbers but recently this M19 has come up for sale a few times on eBay in Yokohama, Japan. So let’s take a closer look at this JDM Baby Benz.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Mercedes-Benz 190E Tommykaira M19 on eBay

1989 BMW 635CSi

Just as Rob’s first 911 experience was a Targa and he consequently always has a soft spot for them, my formative BMW experience was my father’s first foray into German automobiles. I was a young teenager when he purchased a 1982 633CSi. Coming from a family that had otherwise had only Toyotas, the 633CSi looked, felt and went in exotic ways I could never have imagined. The tactile sensations remain with me; the bark of the exhaust, the smell of the leather, how unbelievably small and uncomfortable that rear seat was.

He later followed up the 633 with a 1985 635CSi. Though outwardly the only change was larger wheels and the front air dam with integrated spoiler, it felt much more modern. I didn’t know it at the time, but of course that’s because it was – underneath, the E24 had moved to the E28 bits and that really did make a difference when you drove the two back to back. But BMW wasn’t done updating the dinosaur from the 70s quite yet.

1988 saw a host of further upgrades to the chassis even as its planned successor 8-series was completed on the drawing board computer. Inside the car got an airbag steering wheel, while outside saw revisions to the headlights and bumper caps. But the bigger news was under the hood, where the M30B35 replaced the B34. Moving from the 3.2 to 3.4 motor between the 633 and 635 change had netted only 1 more horsepower for the shark, though it did have more torque. However the newly updated 3.4 really did up performance a few ticks. Now with 208 horsepower and 214 lb.ft of torque, the last of the E24s were the best non-M you could buy in terms of luxury, performance and drivability. It’s no surprise, then, that they’re also generally the most valuable outside of the M range, and this 1989 has been offered with no reserve to the delight of many bidders:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 BMW 635CSi on eBay

Another Alpina Alumnus: 1989 Alpina B10 3.5/1

Update 2/18/18 – the Buy It Now option dropped from $28,500 to $18,000. What a deal!

Lucky for us, we get to continue the string of great-to-see Alpina E34s today with this B10 3.5/1. Unlike the BiTurbo from last week, the 3.5/1 made due with a naturally aspirated form of the M30. Still, head and software changes netted over 250 horsepower, and with the suspension and aerodynamic tweaks you’ve come to expect from Buchloe these were anything but pokey. Best of all, because they’re not the more extoic twin-turbo version pricing is a lot more manageable in general.

But several of the last Alpinas I’ve written up have also had major credential problems. So is this one to consider collectable, or is it another clever copy?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Alpina B10 3.5/1 on eBay

1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC

I go back and forth on red Mercedes-Benz. On certain models like the SL, I think the color suits the car quite well. On sedans, I generally despise it. Coupes? Well, it can go either way in my eyes. This car, a 1989 560SEC for sale near London, I’m actually a fan of. Painted in Signal Red, this Bruno Sacco designed coupe is a lot of red to take in, but it’s far from garish in my opinion. Granted, the European-spec C126 looks really good in any color and Sacco himself that it is one of his favorite designs (outside of the door handles that he lost the battle with the engineers over). I must admit, I can’t argue with him.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC on eBay

1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

I like comparisons. Anyone who has been a reader here long enough will probably know that by now. So to follow upon yesterday’s early Slantnose 930 Coupe we’ll move to the end of the line for a more rare and much more expensive example. And it’s a Cabriolet rather than a Coupe. Sometimes comparisons don’t always go as smoothly as you’d like. Regardless, I find such discussions illuminating. Those on the search for a Slantnose 930 may be interested to know about each of these and their relative characteristics. One might be much more suitable for the collector, while the other more for those looking to spend some time behind the wheel. Truthfully both could make for interesting additions to a collection, but they’re not entirely equal in that regard. I don’t think you’d want to spend too much time driving this one.

With that out of the way let’s look at this car: a paint-to-sample Light Blue Metallic 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet with Linen Grey interior and just 22,502 miles on it. Only 28 930 Cabriolets came equipped with the Slantnose option in 1989 and even fewer of those were paint to sample. A rare 930 indeed.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet on Excellence Magazine

1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I can’t say that I’ve really considered a brown car for myself, nor do I tend to specifically look for them. Not surprisingly, they’re fairly rare outside of the late-70s when the color apparently was more in vogue so whether I was looking for one or not the opportunities would be few and far between.

There is something about them though. Maybe it’s that they’re a natural color, even in one of the darker hues, which produces an affinity in us we didn’t anticipate. I do know I have a strong preference for metallic brown over the non-metallic variants. There are exceptions to that, but they are truly exceptions.

This one, a Cognac Brown Metallic 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa located in Colorado with 67,754 miles on it, doesn’t bother with being an exception. It’s metallic and even though the lighting does not do justice to it this 911 looks really good.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I’ve been looking at a decent number of high-end and modern Porsches lately – something I’ve enjoyed more than I realized when it comes to the modern cars – but it’s time to, at least briefly, return to the roots of my 911 obsession: the classic 911. We won’t be moving into the territory of incredibly reasonable pricing because this one is pretty expensive, but it is the ethos of the machine that draws me back. In truth it is the 911SC that really started it all for me, but the 3.2 Carrera is a close enough sibling that I tend to group the two models together as one long evolutionary development.

Here we will move right to the end of 3.2 Carrera production for one of the best looking examples I’ve come across in a while: a Guards Red 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe, located in Ft. Lauderdale, with a Beige interior (more on that later) and 65,980 miles on it. It seems nearly the entire car has been replaced, restored, and/or rebuilt making this Carrera look almost factory new. Outside of a few ultra-low-mileage examples I cannot recall one whose condition looked this good.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on Rennlist

Velvet Unreserved: 1989 Porsche 944

The takeaway from yesterday’s twin Baltic Blue 944S2s was that, while the model is generally a good bet for collectors, neither of the examples was a stellar buy. But they’re not alone; even though I’ll continue to argue that they’re undervalued relative to what they are, the reality is that many come to market with price tags that are just too high. Even though sellers’ ‘whataboutme’ attitude towards the model is arguably justified, the asking prices usually aren’t.

Yet today we’re looking at another 944. And not a top tier one at that – generally speaking, this particular model is the least appealing of the end of the run. It’s the last-year 8-valve motor, so you can imagine that if the 944S2 was overshadowed by the Turbo, this model was positively left in the dark. You got early 944 appearances with the slightly punched-out 2.7 liter inline-4. That gave you a bump to 162 horsepower, up from 158 in the high-compression 2.5 from the previous year. That didn’t sound like much, but with revised gear ratios and a healthy bump in torque, these ’89s are claimed to be the quickest of the 8V normally aspirated run. But without a “S”, “S2”, or “Turbo” script adorning its rear, and with the 924S gone to greener second-hand dealers, the regular old 944 assumed the position at the very bottom of the totem pole in the Porsche lineup.

So why buy it?

Simple. Price. It’s very easy to forget just how darn expensive Porsches were in the late 80s – even the 4-cylinder ones. That was why the 924S was so appealing. Sure, it wasn’t the glitziest Porsche out there. But it was also the only one you could buy new in the $20,000 range. By 1989? If you wanted a Turbo, you’d pay the best part of $45,000 delivered.…

Double Take – Both Baltic: 1989 Porsche 944S2

I’ve been ignoring the 944. It’s not that I have changed my opinion, or no longer love the thorn-in-Porsche-purists collective sides. But after spending plenty of time telling everyone what an incredible value the 924/44/68 series are for a while, I just capitulated that the market was unwilling to lift these well-built sports cars to a level which they deserve to be. Or, at the very least, I really felt like they should be on level footing with models that were their contemporaries; the Turbo, for example, which still regularly trades well below Quattro and M3 prices despite superior performance.

Yet while my attention swayed, some light has been shed on the model. As insane prices continue to reign in Munich and the Quattro has begun to rise precipitously over the past year, what was once a sure-bet value has commenced rapid appreciation – at least, in some cases. The high-water mark recent was just set with a 66,000 mile Grand Prix White 968 Coupe which sold for $36,250. That’s big money for the big four-cylinder. While not every single example is going to similarly take off, the writing may be on the wall.

So today I’ve got two 944S2 models to consider. Down on power (211 v. 237 with VarioCam) and a gear from the later model, they’ve always played second-fiddle to the Turbo S/89 Turbo models and the updated 968. Both are presented in the neat color of Baltic Blue Metallic. One is pristine, and one’s more of a project. Which is the one to grab?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 944S2 on eBay