All posts tagged 1994

1994 Porsche 911 Speedster

While those of us in the Eastern US deal with below average temperatures (or insane amounts of snow) it’s nice to day dream of taking out an open-topped car and enjoying the sun and the wind as you dive from corner to corner. Porsche’s most bare-bones expression of that ideal has come in the guise of the Speedster and here we have the last of the air-cooled models produced: a paint-to-sample Silver Metallic 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster, at Champion Porsche in Florida, with just 18,802 miles on it. While the 911-based iterations of the Speedster were never as bare bones as the original 356 Speedster, they still took a departure from their more refined and well-equipped Cabriolet brethren, lacking rear seats and possessing a removable windscreen, lighter front seats, and door pulls. Unlike its predecessor the 3.2 Carrera based 911 Speedster, the majority of Speedsters produced for the 964 were modeled off of the Carrera 2 body rather than the wider Turbo-look. Opinions will vary with regard to which is the better looking version, but the narrow-body 964 Speedster certainly strikes a closer resemblance to the original.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster at Champion Porsche

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1994 BMW 850CSi

I have a romantic vision that there will be some day that I’m able to go for a cruise on the weekend with my family in the fast GT car. Part of that stems from a childhood dream; my grandfather was lucky enough to own a Ferrari 250GT/L Lusso back in the 1960s and 1970s; it was long gone before I was any age to appreciate it, but I’ve always had a thought that I could buy one some day. Well, recent market changes have moved the Lusso from a $100,000 Ferrari to a $1,000,000 Ferrari – the chances of me ever buying one have gone from slim to none. Even the replacement models like the 365GTC/4 are also firmly out of reach too. So my dream of the classic Ferrari has moved on to more recent, affordable models. The 456GT is a great example – classic looks, perfect layout, and most reasonable examples can be had between $50,000 and $60,000. Great! The problem? Well, it’s still a Ferrari; frequent belt services seem to run between $6,000 and $10,000, the windows apparently fall out of place and are $1,000 to fix (if you can find and independent who can be trusted), even the brakes are multi-thousand dollars. What’s a reasonable option then? Well, I think the 850CSi is probably one of the best reasonable Ferrari replacements:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW 850CSi on eBay

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Double Take: 964 Turbos – 3.3 vs 3.6

The 930 remains my favorite of the 911 Turbos, but that doesn’t mean I do not appreciate the greatness of its successor based off of the 964. And unlike the 930, which spent most of its life utilizing a 4-speed manual, the 964 came straight out of the box with the 5-speed transmission only available in the final year of 930 production. However, because initially the 964 carried over the 3.3 liter turbocharged engine from the 930, which was later replaced with a turbocharged 3.6 liter engine, there are a couple different options to choose from when on the market for a 964 Turbo. Though as we shall see here they fall within dramatically different cost scales. Here we will look at the two most common variants: the standard 3.3 liter 964 Turbo produced from 1990-1992 and the 911 Turbo 3.6 produced from 1993-1994. Each of these also came in a small-production Turbo S form, which remain some of the most sought after 911s on the market.

We’ll start with this 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in Brooklyn, with just 28,140 miles on it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

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1994 Audi S4

It’s funny that as enthusiasts we desire what we can’t have; there are a plethora of Audis that aren’t import friendly currently that I long after and plenty of rare BMWs and Mercedes-Benz models that make the collective jaws of the automotive community hang low. Yesterday’s European-spec 1994 M5 3.8 is a great example. It’s a very rare car that in pristine shape draws some serious dollars out of the woodwork and enthusiasts pine over. But in terms of all-out speed and value for your money, the Audi S4 packs much more punch than than the boys from Munich or Unterturkheim. Available generally for a quarter to at most half the price of most of the E34 M5/500Es on offer that are in reasonable shape, they can easily be customized and upgraded – and the results can be fantastic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Audi S4 on eBay

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1994 BMW M5 Euro-Spec

It’s a bit of a Euro-spec day here at GCFSB, and both of the featured cars are rare to see on this side of the pond. In the case of the earlier 420SEC, it’s rare to see them because there weren’t many produced and stateside we have the 560SEC that ran at the same time; in many respects, the smaller motor is a curiosity and a neat side note, but offers no real advantage to U.S. buyers. However, this example is very different; a Euro-spec 1994 M5. While the M5 left U.S. shores in 1993, it soldiered on for a few years in Europe with a revised and enlarged motor. Dubbed the S38B38, the new motor gained 25 horsepower but importantly 30 lb.ft of torque – it was now only 17 horsepower shy of 100 more than the U.S. spec E28 M5’s S38B35. That made up for some extra pounds that adorned the E34 chassis versus the earlier M cars and the M5 was even more of a flyer once again. A few of these 3.8 cars and motors have made their way stateside but they’re still quite rare to find. Usually, they have some neat oddities that we didn’t get here, such as this example’s Hurricane cloth interior. All in all, it makes for one tidy performance package that’s still quite discrete:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW M5 Euro-spec on eBay

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