1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup

Normally I would post this car as one of our Motorsports Monday posts, but since this listing is set to end on Monday that wouldn’t be terribly effective. So today will have to do. Regardless, I expect it still will be available after Monday as well.

This model should need little introduction, but for those unfamiliar with them this is 1 of the 45* U.S. Edition 964 Carrera Cup cars Porsche imported in 1992. The idea was that these cars would all compete in support races for the CART series. Alas, sponsorship for the series couldn’t be secured and these cars were left without a purpose. Porsche, however, had other ideas, converted them to road legal specs, and sold them to customers anyway. In most ways these served as a replacement for the Carrera RS, which the US never received. As the ad below notes some of those were returned to race trim with full roll cage and stripped interior. This is one of those cars.

*A quick about the numbers: there were 45 Carrera Cup cars imported for the race series, so I’m not quite sure what the 1 of 25 mentioned in the ad is in reference to. Perhaps the number of cars reverted to race trim?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1995 Porsche 911RS Carrera Cup/3.8 RSR

Race cars, by definition, don’t lead a pampered life. Often they’re tossed around, crashed, bashed, and driven hard when wet. They are infrequently all-original, as many go through multiple changes in rules (even within a single season) and need to evolve to remain current. Also infrequently do they stay with one owner, changing hands multiple times as the years pass more quickly than laps. Then, a generation on, they’re no longer competitive and shelved in favor of the newest, greatest and latest track weapon. In short, they’re pretty much a collector’s nightmare.

But over the past decade a growing appreciation for vintage motorsport means there is increasing attention focused on ex-factory race models. And, even though the air has cooled slightly on the Porsche market, it’s still at a pretty astronomic level. Put those two factors together with a low production period racer, and even though it’s far from original condition, it’s the recipe for enthusiast’s dreams and an asking price high enough to make small African nation dictator’s son feel jealous.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911RS Carrera Cup/3.8 RSR on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup 3.8 RSR

Over the weekend I took advantage of some frankly great streaming video from the IMSA Racing application to view some of the Rolex 24 at Daytona. And the action was thrilling, with several classes being decided not in the last hour, but in the last minutes. Of particular interest to me was the GTLM category, where Porsche had been going round after round with team Corvette over the past few years. And while they weren’t challenging for the overall victory, it gave me pause to consider Porsche’s contribution to racing. You see, Porsche has recorded 22 overall victories at Daytona, but what’s perhaps more impressive is the claimed 77 class victories they’ve claimed. It wasn’t to be this year, but one of the 991 RSRs did make it to the podium. Fitting, then, that we should look at one of the more impressive and expensive variants of the 911 RSR; the 993 Cup 3.8. Only 30 of these racing variants were produced; less even than the road-going 3.8 Carrera RS with which it shared its name. Lightened, widened and with something like 400 horsepower coming from the race-prepared motor, these are still seriously potent track weapons today some 20 years later:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup 3.8 RSR on Race Cars Direct

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Motorsports Monday: 2001 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

The number of Porsche 911 variants can be baffling. Just the other day, Rob and I were joking back and forth that at one point a few years ago, Porsche offered no less than 20 variations of the 911 model to the public. Not to be outdone, the current lineup has added one more and created a nice drinking game of “How many current 911 models could you name?” Add in the racing variants, and things get even more convoluted. Porsche’s top of the heap racing model has always varied, but when it came to the 996 Porsche went full-bore with the 911 GT3 Cup program and created a potent race car for pros and well-to-do amateurs as well. Indeed, the GT3 Cup program was the model for many customer-based race programs that exist in Audi, Lamborghini, Aston Martin, Ferrari and the like today. But the lineage of the GT3 gets confusing, too. Launched in 1998, it was effectively a replacement for the 993 Carrera Cup model. Called the GT3 Cup, it was a stripped out factory built race car with a turned up motor and some trick suspension and wheels, along with a little added aero tweaks that would be the basis for the later road going model named after it – the 911 GT3. Confused? Well, in 1999 Porsche dropped the “Cup” from the name and added “R” to make race models distinct from road going models. Now, that’s easier. Then, they brought the GT3 Cup model back in 2000 with some mild performance upgrades. But things really started to get messy in 2001, when the company launched the GT3 RS model – not to be confused with the GT3 RS road going model, which wasn’t launched until 2003. Still with me? Well, then in 2004 they needed to differentiate the road and race GT3 RS, so with some more upgrades was launched the GT3 RSR. On the way from Cup to RSR, Porsche added more downforce, wider flares and more vents, along with more power and even wider tires. The 2001 RS model struck a balance between the Cup and RSR, with wider rear track and flared front fenders, but without the massive venting and sequential gearbox of the later model:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

For German car fans who love racing, it doesn’t get much more exciting than Porsche’s long history of endurance racing. Indeed, Porsche’s venerable 911 seems intrinsically linked with racing – undoubtedly, part of its mystique. However, true factory racing Porsches have always been pretty expensive when new and still are so. Watching yesterday’s coverage of the 24 Hours of Daytona had me cringing as the multi-hundred thousand dollar Le Mans class 991 Porsches took each other out, attacked Opossums and exploded crankcases. It wasn’t a great day for Porsche at a track where the company has had an impressive string of successes. So, today I decided to take a look at two racing Porsches as an homage to their first rate engineering, their enduring appeal and incredible performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on eBay

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1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup

The ad below does a good job of explaining the intention behind the Carrera Cup model so I’ll get right to the present example. Purchased as a collector, this pristine Carrera Cup has spent its life in California and at no point has it visited a track. I don’t want to say it’s flawless because few cars are, but this is probably as close as we’ll get. This leaves me torn. Opportunities for coming across a 20 year old track car that is in nearly new condition are obviously quite rare, especially when only 45 of such cars were built in the first place. Yet, these were cars specifically built to be raced. As such, this car has never had a chance to fulfill its single-minded purpose in life. So here we are: a beautiful and rare 964 that is both lighter and more powerful than the Carrera 2 on which it was based. It needs a home (and maybe just one track day).

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Year: 1992
Model: 911 Carrera Cup
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 773 mi
Price: Call for price

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup at Canepa Design

VIN: WP0AB2967NS420576

Only 773 miles
One of 45 produced
In 1992, Porsche introduced two Carrera lightweight cars for the US market. One was the RS America, a performance oriented lower cost alternative to the regular Carrera 2, that was 76 pounds lighter than the base Carrera 2. 701 of these cars were sold in North America from 1992-1994. The second car was bit more special.

A total of 45 Carrera Cup USA editions were imported into the United States in 1992 exclusively to complete in a national race series. That series never materialized and Porsche decided to sell these 45 cars directly to consumers. Certainly not a low cost alternative, the Carrera Cup cars commanded a 20% premium over the base Carrera 2 Coupe, coming in at $78,340.

By the time the decision had been made to sell the Cup cars to the public, Andial had already transformed 25 of the cars into full race-spec. Although they had never been driven, the cars had to be “reconverted” back to street form by Andial and Porsche NA. This is one of the 25 “reconverted” Andial race cars. The only remaining elements of the conversion are 2 tubes left from the roll cage on each side of the engine compartment; remnants of the roll cage weld pads inside the car; and stiffer steering coupler links. The car received a special dash plaque with its VIN and separate Andial race-spec sub-serial number. This car is number three of the 25.

This is a Porsche that was slated to be a racecar from the outset. At 2760 lbs, the Carrera Cup USA is 271 lbs lighter that the standard Carrera 2. The engine is rated at 280hp, a 34 hp increase. The wheels on the car are the racing magnesium editions that save 23.3 lbs over the aluminum wheels. The suspension is firmer and 2″ lower than the Carrera 2. In fact, no system on the car was overlooked to produce as much performance as the 964 chassis could deliver.

Sold new through Newport Auto Center in California, this Carrera Cup USA has been a California car ever since. Kept as a collector car since day one it has only accumulated 773 miles since its purchase, and has been kept in immaculate cosmetic and mechanical condition.

Major differences from the standard Carrera 2:

Engine:
Increased horsepower and torque
Race type engine mounts

Drivetrain:
Varialble ratio limited slip differential
Sport Flywheel
Short shifter
Steel synchronizer rings in transmission

Body/Equipment:
Manual mirrors left and right
Various reinforcement chassis welds
Package shelf (no rear seats)
Hood is made of aluminum with no gas struts
Body cavity wax, undercoating and sound deadening components have been eliminated
No air conditioner
RS America-type door panels with pull strap for door opener
36 ampere hour battery
Master electrical cutoff in trunk
Partial electric seats
No sunroof
Racing electrical charging system

Suspension and Brakes:
Suspension has stiffer Carrera RS springs and shocks
Braking system has different calibrations
Manual steering
Adjustable stabilizer bars

Spares:

1 Roundel
1 Carpet covered package tray
1 Under tray 964-119-029-04
1 Engine cover 964-119-014-03
1 Engine cover 964-119-015-03
1 Engine cover 964-119-012-03
1 Engine cover 964-119-013-03
1 Floor mat set 000-044-801-41-5FV
1 Door sill trim 964-559-293-01-01C
1 Cover strip 964-559-295-01-01C
6 Plastic Grommets 999 702 160 40
1 Screw 900-143-149-07
6 Clip 999-591-916-40
1 license plate bracket.

Contact Canepa Design on (831) 430-9940

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We’ve seen a Carrera Cup listed anywhere from $75,000 to $160,000 so pegging the likely cost of this one is a little difficult. Given the condition of this car we can expect it to be at the higher end of that scale, possibly even exceeding it. At this point, this car will remain forever a collector; a museum piece witnessing to a racing series that never was and the closest thing to a 964 RS ever sold in the US. In a way that’s sad, but I suppose having every one of these raced until they died would be sad too.

-Rob

2004 Porsche 911 GT3

Read through most automotive blogs comparing newer sports cars and you’ll often find the same entry in the comments: “X car’s purchase price buys you a lot of Porsche Cayman.” For good reason, too, as the Cayman has become the performance benchmark for an entire category of both new and used sports cars. To borrow a line from everyone’s playbook, the Cayman’s purchase price buys you a lot of Porsche 996 GT3. A performance staple in Europe as a track day special starting around 1999, the GT3 was the street going version of the GT3R and the GT3 Cup. While most car companies build performance cars that people buy and modify to take to the track, Porsche built a modified track version of its performance car for you to buy right from them. Stripped out and with boosted performance, handling and braking, the GT3 was only a touch slower than the more powerful Turbo. The U.S. first received the GT3 in 2004, the year of today’s model:

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Year: 2004
Model: 996 GT3
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 43,395 mi
Price: $49,900 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche 911 GT3 on ebay

Excellent condition. Always Garaged. Meticulously Maintained. Smoke-free. Purchased from a private party in 2007 with only 3000 miles.

Location: Huntington Beach, California. Buyer responsible for pickup or shipping.

Payments: $500 Paypal deposit within 48 hours of close, and balance as a bank issued check or cash within 7 days.

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This particular GT3 has the PCCB ceramic brake option, an option which I think honestly most drivers could do without, but does give you the attention-grabbing yellow calipers. With 381 horsepower on tap – over 50 more than a brand new Cayman S – performance of these cars is still staggeringly good. This is a car that you can comfortably arrive at the track in, blow the doors off most race cars, and then cruise home with the air conditioning on. As with all higher-performance versions of the 911, the GT3 requires more maintenance than a standard car, and it’s a touch more expensive. Known faults with these cars included coolant leaks from glued fittings, but they’re repairable and shouldn’t dissuade a potential buyer from the car in general.

A fair amount of GT3s have seen occasional track duty, but that’s to be expected from what is essentially a track car. This particular model seems to be quite clean and well cared for. The silver is understated but classic Porsche. Probably like most, I think the 996 isn’t the most attractive 911 that’s been produced; but the simple yet aggressive race look of the GT3 would be enough to convince me. Historically special editions of the 911 seem to hold or gain value, so while this may not be the bottom of the GT3 market yet, it could be a good time to get a clean one to drive and hold on to. At $57,500, this is entry level Cayman money – but if it were my money, I’d walk away from the dealership and find one of these special cars to enjoy weekends and the occasional trip to the track.

-Carter

1992 Porsche 911 964 Carrera Cup Car, 1 of 45 Legal Cars in the U.S.

Here is a really rare opportunity for 964 series Porsche 911 fans to own what is described as a thinly veiled 964 RS — that never came to our shores. Luckily the .

Obviously only hard-core collectors need to take notice as even 965 Turbos go for less than half of this. But the RS and Cup cars could be compared to the GT3 models of today, which are considered the “drivers” tool of choice.

The owner of this car points to the CarreraCupUSA.org site which has all the details on what makes this car special, including this great article from Excellence detailing the nuances that make this car special. Cliff Notes:

  • Very unusual import procedure made these cars road legal. All 45 were intended for a race series that never got off the ground. They were modified by Andial to compete in the race series, but when the series went bust, they were converted back to road cars, which were U.S. legal, and sold.
  • Basically a U.S. legal version of the 1992 964 RS, plus some factory modifications for racing, minus some of the trick bits that made the RS a great road car.
  • Crazy 964 fanatics like myself put a ridiculous value on these cars due to their story and rarity.

You can put this car under my Powerball fantasy winning picks as usual. In the meantime, check out these 964 Carrera Cup resource pages:

February 2004 Excellence magazine article, “America’s Cup”
Great side by side comparison of RS and Carrera Cup stats on p-cars – plus it features an example of $89,000. Who knows how old this reference is…
Porsche 964 Wikipedia entry

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