1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S – REVISIT

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The very rare Cobalt Blue Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S we featured back in October remains up for sale. The original auction was bid to $295,100, a figure a good bit below where we’d expect it to sell and far below the seller’s current asking price of $795,000. Given the rare color and other features of this Turbo S a high price is to be expected, but I feel like the more likely result will lie somewhere between those two numbers. That puts us pretty far away from a sale here, but for one of the more interesting examples we’ve come across we can expect that it will garner quite a bit of attention nonetheless.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site October 30, 2015:

Motorsports Monday: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S

I get it. You want to tell your friends that on the weekends you race a Guards Red Porsche Turbo S. But your bank account tells your friends that a Kia Soul is more your speed. What’s a Porschephile to do? Look to the watercooled transaxle cars, that’s what you do. Though prices of 944 Turbo S models have been soaring, if you’re less interested in a pristine, low mile street worthy example, a track prepared car can provide you with the thrills of boosted ownership at a much more reasonable rate. Today’s example shows us why:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S on eBay

1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose – REVISIT

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The Black 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose remains for sale and the sellers have reduced the starting bid significantly from the astronomical price of $950K to the still-insanely-high price of $600K. As this remains a reserve auction the actual selling price may remain the same, but perhaps this time it might actually receive a bid. This is a car we will likely have our eye on for a long time as it could give us one of the few chances to get a handle on what buyers are willing to pay for these ultra-rare Turbos. The price likely is still well above where it needs to be, but with time perhaps it will enter more reasonable territory. It does make me wonder though: what would be a reasonable starting bid for this auction?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site January 5, 2016:

1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose

Naturally it took me very little time to decide whether to feature this car after I came across it. Here we have a 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose. 1 of 39 produced for the US market, and 1 of 93 total Turbo S produced worldwide. The 3.6 Turbo S was the final iteration of a variety of 964 turbos Porsche produced beginning in 1991 with the basic Turbo, which carried over the 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-six that had served the 930 so well for many years. In 1993 a turbocharged version of the 964’s 3.6 liter flat-six finally was readied and as a final send-off Porsche Exclusive took hold of the remaining Turbo chassis available to produce a Turbo S based off of that 3.6 liter engine. The majority of the 93 cars produced (66 in all) featured the 968-derived flatnose and that nose remains the car’s most identifiable feature. Other notable features are a unique whale tail, Speedline wheels, quad exhaust, and rear air inlets to help feed air to the engine. And of course, they had more power – 385 hp – all delivered to the rear wheels. These were the last of the purely rear-drive Turbos Porsche would produce outside of the GT2, which raised the insanity even more. The 964 saw a pretty large number of limited production models and for its combination of performance and refinement the Turbo S remains one of the best.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S

For those that haven’t had the pleasure of driving a 944 Turbo S, allow me to describe the sensation. If you’ve ever wondered what it would be like to be the stone in a sling shot, it’s a pretty good analogy. My first drive in a S saw me pull up to a merge onto a secondary highway. The slightest gap opened in traffic, and since I was in a Porsche I naturally thought that half a car length with the closing traffic at 65 m.p.h. seemed doable. Clutch out, foot on the floor, and….nothing. I thought I stalled the car. I had just enough time to look down in disbelief, feel the blood draining from my head and look into the mirror, uttering “Oh…shi” when BAM – the car came on boost. Like the intro to Star Trek – The Next Generation, the front of the car stretched towards the sky and elongated as I rocketed forwards. How that manifests itself on track leads towards a very odd driving style. At my favorite track, Lime Rock Park, for example, in the Turbo S you need to be on throttle when you should be off throttle. Otherwise, if you wait for the car to be where you would normally hit the throttle, you’re halfway down the straight. The best example of where this odd throttle usage comes into play is in “Big Bend”. A decreasing radius corner, if you nail the throttle after the first apex, normally you’d spear straight off the road. The last thing you want to do when those front tires need to bite in a car with 250 horsepower is lift the nose up. But when you nail the throttle in the 944 Turbo, it doesn’t have 250 horsepower. It has 10. Maybe 12. So, you plant the throttle, turn in and as you’re about to hit the apex BAM, the boost comes on, helping to rotate the rear end and you can throttle out of the corner.…

1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

For a car as rare as the 993 Turbo S we do seem to be coming across a decent number of them right now. The one we see here certainly qualifies as one of the more interesting color palettes and even at the insane prices we see for these it should attract a good deal of interest. Here we have a Cobalt Blue Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in Washington, with Midnight Blue leather interior and yellow accents with 17,917 miles on it. The blue on blue look is something I have grown accustomed to seeing on the 911. I’m far less accustom to the yellow accents we see in this interior, which certainly make a bold statement and help break up an otherwise monochromatic appearance to the car as a whole. I’m not sure what sparked the choice of yellow – perhaps it is as simple as matching the brake calipers of the Turbo S – and I’m equally as unsure of what I think about it. Thankfully the use of yellow was fairly restrained. I have no reservations about the exterior color choice: Cobalt Blue simply is fantastic and here on a Turbo S it looks both aggressive and alluring. With 424 hp the Turbo S are fantastically quick cars that bring with them a high level of refinement and luxury. While perhaps lacking some of the insanity of the 964 Turbo S, especially the lightened 3.3 liter version, there is little to find at fault with the 993 and the overall shape is about as good as it gets. This is the final evolution of the air-cooled 911 design and when I look at that shape I quickly understand the disappointment felt by 911 enthusiasts upon the release of the 996.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Here’s a rare thing: these days the only thing more rare than a limited-production air-cooled 911 is a limited-production air-cooled 911 with a decent number of miles on it. And that’s exactly what we have here with this Black on Black 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in Northern Virginia, that has seen 105,280 miles over the course of its life. While I’m sure we have all suspected such cars to exist we almost never come across them and for this to be the last and most valuable of the air-cooled Turbos (excepting, of course, the 993 GT2) I’m shocked to see it. It’s fantastic though! The current owner of this car, who has had it since 2001, certainly appears to have gotten the most out of this purpose-built machine. With the market for air-cooled Turbos in the midst of a precipitous climb where might potential buyers value this example with such high mileage? Hopefully this auction will shed some light.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

I’m not sure if I can do justice to this car. While not the ultimate version of the 964 Turbo, nor the ultimate air-cooled 911 Turbo, the 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau remains for me the best. It is the final iteration of Porsche’s turbocharged 3.3 liter flat-six that had been in use since 1978 powering these machines to heights most other automakers scarcely would have envisioned. This is a car that probably never should have existed since Porsche likely had intended for the 964 Turbo to debut with a turbocharged version of the 3.6 liter engine found in other iterations of the model. But the development of that engine took time and the early years of the 964 saw the continued usage of the engine from the 930. When it finally became time to retire its use, Porsche gave the 3.3 a wonderful send-off in the guise of the Turbo S: a lightened, more powerful, version of the standard 964 Turbo that remains one of the lowest production models in the Porsche portfolio. I featured one a couple months ago that we surely wouldn’t call subtle, but whose exterior did come in a somewhat subdued Silver. The one we see here, painted in stunning Electric Blue Metallic, possesses no such subtlety and will be on auction as part of Silverstone Auctions’ Salon Privé 2015 on September 4 in Oxfordshire, England.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau on Silverstone Auctions

1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S Silver Rose with 7,000 Miles

Ultra-low mileage cars always present a bit of a conundrum. Lust worthy? Without a doubt; I certainly look at every car that I have owned and wished that it was effectively in brand-new condition with no prior signs of ownership or the years that have passed. But what’s the cost of having had someone lovingly look after the car you’d desire today? Well, it’s relative in some regards. Let’s look at this 1988 944 Turbo S and break it down – is this mega-priced 944 Turbo S Silver Rose Edition still the giant killer it was 27 years ago?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S on Autotrader

1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

We’ve all seen the insanity of the Porsche 993 Turbo market. As air-cooled 911s in general have steadily appreciated in value, the most powerful of the last of the air-cooled models has lead the way with precipitous gains seemingly defying all reason. Naturally, the more rare the model the more extreme those value increases have been and with buyers now showing little hesitation to ask for $200K+ for a standard Turbo it is no wonder that Turbo S owners would seek to capitalize on the madness with even steeper asking prices. That brings us to the example here, a Black and Tan 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in Florida, with just 9,208 miles on it and an asking price over half a million dollars. There is no doubt that these will stand beside the 993 Carrera RS and GT2 as the most sought-after models, with the GT2 leading the way by a substantial margin. While power increases weren’t substantial for the US market (424 hp vs 408 hp for the standard Turbo) the relative scarcity of the model and the cachet of saying you have the baddest air-cooled 911 around garner these cars significant appreciation. They also marked a slight change in the ethos of the model itself that has continued up to today. Unlike the 964 Turbo S, which was lightened and austere in its fittings, the 993 Turbo S retained the luxurious offerings that have been a hallmark of the 911 Turbo since its inception. It was to be the most refined and powerful road-going 911. Of course, with the release of the GT2 Porsche insured that its customers had both options available to them and sent the air-cooled 911 out in the best ways possible.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay