1990 Audi V8 Quattro

Every time I think I’m out, another one pulls me back in. I’ve pretty well documented my love/hate/love relationship with the Audi V8 quattro, and today’s example has placed me firmly back into “Camp Love”. It’s funny, too, because I really don’t think the big-body Audis look particularly good in Tornado Red; I once joked upon seeing a red V8 Quattro “Here comes the Fire Chief!” But something about the condition of today’s example has me rethinking that stance; perhaps it’s the low miles; perhaps it’s the rare to see great and clean condition; but more likely than not, it’s just that it’s a non-Pearlesant White V8:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi V8 quattro on craigslist.org


Year: 1990
Model: V8 quattro
Engine: 3.6 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 54,600 mi
Price: $7,500

Up for sale is my 1990 Audi V8 Quattro with 54k original miles. The body is galvanized aluminum so there is no rust. It has a 3.6 V8 with an automatic transmission. The leather is tip top, no electronic gremlins or engine lights. I have been using this as my daily driver and it drives and stops great, definitely reliable! I recently added new items like:
– 17″ OG rims with Bridgestone Potenza tires $1456
– New windshield from Safelite $349
– Bosch icon wiper baldes $53
– Brand new OEM Audi grille $55
– Brand new OEM Audi left blinker $185
– Brand new blinker gaskets $42 each side
– Alignment and brake bleed @ Les Scwhab $180

For those who know this is truly a tough car to come by and a beast in the snow!

All that said, I’m not a fan of the wheels. Sorry, I just don’t really like the look of the black wheels on this car. It’s an easy fix; pick up a set of the 15×7.5 BBS wheels from 1991 or even the more rare 16″ Euro wheels and the problem is fixed. Even better yet, I’d love to see this car rolling on the 17″ Borleos that were Euro-spec. Condition appears to be incredible, but figure on inspecting that timing belt if you can’t figure out when it was done. Ultimately, I’d probably like to swap in sport seats and a later 4.2 and 6-speed powerplant if this were my car, but as it sits this is one of the best condition 1990s I’ve seen, and until the original mill blows it may be worthy just as is. $7,500 is all the money for a 1990, but this condition is impressive and difficult to mimic; Tornado Red is one of the rarest colors on the V8, and the miles are right; if you’re in the market, don’t argue – this is the car.

Thanks to our reader Dan for sending this our way!

-Carter

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15 Comments

  1. Normally I’m not that much of a fan of the red and black but I think it works here! The car really pops in the pictures. I wish I could see it in person.

  2. Dam nice, and local to me.

  3. Love the wheels and color on this one. Different!

  4. Never seen a Tornado Red one – I like it! Price seems very reasonable given the miles and condition.

  5. I had a 1990 V8, the signature shows how much I liked it. A truly top flight car. It was a rare breed with all wool carpeting! You would have to look to a Rolls Royce for that. It was a beast that Audi built to be identified in the left lane in the rear view with the framed grill and headlight wipers saying “I am an Audi Quattro, and I am for real, move over”. It was the move up market for Audi. To me in some ways that was a great thing, in other ways not so great, that they went up market.

    The pics look very good indeed, however I find the miles difficult to believe. My cars odometer failed around 60k and I replaced it. I put an honest 200 k miles on mine before I separated with it. Odometer failure in these cars was not uncommon. I would look into that before investing.

    As for the TBelt, it is a mysterious thing. Visual inspection does not tell you much unfortunately. That said the car was delivered with a 120 k Tbelt change interval, which was quickly reduced to 60k. I did the work as required, but I can also report that a friend did over 200k on one belt before he separated from his car. It’s like Russian roulette.

    I repeat however that I loved my 1990 V8, it was a spectacular car. I guess I have the same love/hate/love problem.

  6. I had a 1990 V8, the signature shows how much I liked it. A truly top flight car. It was a rare bread with all wool carpeting! You would have to look to a Rolls Royce for that. It was a beast that Audi built to be identified in the left lane in the rear view with the framed grill and headlight wipers saying “I am an Audi Quattro, and I am for real, move over”. It was the move up market for Audi. To me in some ways that was a great thing, in other ways not so great, that they went up market.

    The pics look very good indeed, however I find the miles difficult to believe. My cars odometer failed around 60k and I replaced it. I put an honest 200 k miles on mine before I separated with it. Odometer failure in these cars was not uncommon. I would look into that before investing.

    As for the TBelt, it is a mysterious thing. Visual inspection does not tell you much unfortunately. That said the car was delivered with a 120 k Tbelt change interval, which was quickly reduced to 60k. I did the work as required, but I can also report that a friend did over 200k on one belt before he separated from his car. It’s like Russian roulette.

    I repeat however that I loved my 1990 V8, it was a spectacular car. I guess I have the same love/hate/love problem.

  7. Oh my! I just looked at that earlier link! I say buyer beware!

  8. Good spotting Sam, it could be the same car (and likely is!). There weren’t many Tornado Red examples imported.

  9. Don’t get me wrong the instrument clusters in type 44 cars were one of the major headaches, but most of the mechanical odometers failed do to user error, resetting the trip meter while the car was moving was the culprit.

  10. Pity to use it as a daily driver.

  11. definitely the same quattro.. same headunit and folds in the leather seats are identical. good spot sam.

  12. Walter R. Moore

    I am skeptical about the galvanized aluminum – anyone know how much was used on the body way back then?

  13. I believe he is confused. Here’s a quote from Wiki: The Audi A8 (Typ 4D) was presented in February 1994 and debuted at the 1994 Geneva Auto Show in March, with full-scale factory production commencing in June 1994,[2] although it was not until October 1996, for the 1997 model year that it became available in North America. Unlike its predecessor, the Audi V8 model, which was built on an existing steel platform, the A8 debuted on the then-new Volkswagen Group D2 platform, an all aluminium monocoque, marketed as the “Audi Space Frame” (ASF), which helped to reduce weight and preserve structural rigidity.

  14. Yeah, the aluminum bits on the D11 are limited to the engine, drivetrain and a few bits behind the dash; otherwise, it’s steel and plastic outside and for the “frame” – but it is galvanized and a lot more rust-proof than the earlier cars had been. It’s actually a decent tell if it’s had bodywork; if there’s rust on the fenders, for example.

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