1994 Audi 80 Competition quattro

The Audi racing program went through some really interesting changes between the late 1980s and the mid 1990s launch of what became one of the more dominant touring cars produced, the A4 STW. Continuously evolving regulations were part of that, coupled with a global recession and cost-cutting measures among many manufacturers. So it was just a few short years between the flame-breathing iconic 1989 Audi 90 IMSA and the death of the turbocharged Audi racing sedans entirely, though there were some interesting steps in between. For example, Audi tried their hand in the France with the 1992 Audi 80 quattro Supertourisme I looked at a few years ago:

Motorsports Monday: 1992 Audi 80 quattro Supertourisme

That car was powered by a crazy turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four. Simultaneously, Audi built a 2.5 liter V6 80 for the German DTM series, though they ended up withdrawing in protest over the series rules, and the car never ran. Quietly, in the background, a more reasonable – and very entertaining – solution emerged. In 1990, the British Touring Car Championship revised their rules to make racing more affordable in the wake of the massively fast and expensive Ford Sierra RS500s. The new regulations were based around production sedans of no more than 2.0 liters and with no turbochargers. This, in turn, led to a series of homologation specials to make cars legal for the new Super Touring regulations, and Audi was happy to take part. What emerged was the Audi 80 Competition quattro – limited to 2,500 units to comply with regulations, Audi stuffed a development of 2.0 16v inline four also found in the European-market B3 Coupe into the B4 chassis quattro, stuck an S2 front end on it and a raised rear spoiler, quattro-script interior and a few other goodies, and sold them to the public:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Audi 80 Competition quattro on Mobile.de

Year: 1994
Model: 80 Competition quattro
VIN: N/A
Engine: 2.0 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 154,600 km (96,000 mi)
Location: Dürrlauingen, Germany
Price: E. 14,490 (~$17,000 today)

It is with a heavy heart that I part with my Audi 80 2.0 16V Quattro Competition for reasons of space. It is one of a total of 2500 copies built. The color is laser red and not faded or similar (garage car). The car is optically and technically in very good condition. The vehicle has verifiably two vehicle owners (original vehicle registration document available). On-board literature including service booklet is available. A new general inspection can be carried out on request. A lot was invested in the last year and many new parts were installed in OEM quality.

Timing belt set
All filters / liquids
Valve cover gasket
Spark plugs
battery
Distributor cap
Belt Wapu / Servo + Lima
Front brake complete
Front brake hoses
Front shock absorber
Both tie rod ends including wheel alignment
Tank straps (stainless steel)
Exhaust system from Kat (stainless steel)
Heat exchanger heating

This competition is certainly also a car for collectors and has another 3 years until the well-deserved H license plate. I would claim that this is a youngtimer with guaranteed value growth potential.

Worth watching!

In the area of ​​the front bumper and fender, it has a small rust on the left and right that can still be removed (no rust perforation). I still got myself two rustproof, original Audi fenders in laser red, which I would give when I signed the contract.

The vehicle is currently deregistered and can be viewed by appointment.
The price is the basis for negotiation and will be tackled on site after inspection / test drive.

If you have any questions, just give us a call or email!

No last price calls please!

The car this was meant to homologate – the 80 STW – is still one of my favorite race cars, though rare to see. Emanuele Pirro won the Italian Superturismo Championship in 1994 in his – and the Competition’s spoiler extensions allowed for a neater and higher rear wing. Laser Red looks great on the B4, as do the Votex 16″ wheels that were the signature of the Competition – though they were also offered in the US on late production Cabriolets. These were intended to be more lightweight, so options are fewer than normal B3/B4 variants; cloth seats with manual controls and no heaters, manual climate control with no air conditioning, manual rear windows. Condition appears to be top on this one as well, and maintenance is claimed to be up to date. The price is high, but then this really is pretty cheap as limited-production homologation specials go. Prefer silver? There’s another for sale in that shade as well, for about the same money. These may not grab the splashy headlines of the S2 and RS2, but they’re a solid pickup for a collector-grade Audi from the 90s.

-Carter

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7 Comments

  1. James P Fuerstenberg

    really not a bad price for a semi-rare car like this..

  2. I bet these are slow by modern standards, but man, the car looks great. B4 sedan with the S2 bumper and that clean rear spoiler make it work!

  3. Wish I still had my bright green Audi Fox. It was a fun car to drive.

  4. I love this thing, so cool.

  5. Neat car. Beautiful to look at for sure! I wonder what it’s like to drive?

  6. I had 80 Competition just like this for a few years. There were two equipment packages, which had either electric sunroof or manual climate control. There might have been some other things on those packages as well. I think Laserrot was offered only in Competition, it was really bright red, more bright than Tornadorot, for example.

    I still love how it looks. Rear bumber is its most exclusive part, shared with S2 sedan. If I remember correct, S2 coupe and Avant bumpers don’t fit. It was a solid car to drive with its sport chassis. Unfortunaltely the 16V engine was its weak point, disappointing, underpowered and lacked torque. Fuel injection is KE-Jetronic, which was a old technic in 1994. This is why many Competitions have been 1.8T (or even turbo-5) swapped, which I understand, but it makes a original car like this even more rare.

  7. It’s very odd that they ran KE-Jet on this motor, since the similar period 2.0 16V ABF in the GTI produced 10 more horsepower with Digifant fuel injection. It probably makes sense in some weird VAG way, though.

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