1967 BMW 2000CS

Stepping even a bit further back in BMW’s timeline, today we have a Neue Klasse Coupe. The E120 was as evolution of the Bertone 3200CS design from the early 1960s, but BMW’s design head – one very famous Mr. Wilhelm Hofmeister – certainly added his own distinctive flair. However, he wasn’t alone – some of the most famous car designers from the period had influence – from the aforementioned Bertone, Giugiaro, and of course Michelotti (designer of the 700 series as well) all had a hand.

While the lines looked exotic, underneath the chassis and drivetrain were borrowed straight from the more pedestrian Neue Klasse sedans. Power came from the venerable 2.0 inline-4 M10 fed by twin Solex carbs. The CS had the higher compression (9.3:1) 120 horsepower version, while the C and CA made due with 100. This was still a huge step for BMW, who lacked the capability to produce the complex body structure on its normal assembly lines. As a result, like its successors the E9 and early E24 models, the 2000C, CA and CS Coupes would be produced by Karmann in Osnabrück. A total of approximately 13,691 were produced between its 1965 launch and the takeover of the 2800CS introduction in 1968.

So, they’re old, a bit quirky-looking by BMW standards, and rare. That certainly makes for the potential for a collector car! And this one is claimed to be a mostly original survivor, to boot:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 BMW 2000CS on eBay

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1988 Audi 80 quattro

Rounding out my trio of grunge-era Audis, let’s take a look at the entry level quattro-equipped model – the 80. While the move from the B2 to B3 chassis brought many changes to the small Audi lineup, it was also very much a case of ‘meet the new boss, same as the old boss’. Some of the features of the 4000 were gone; you could no longer opt to lock the center differential, for example, since the manual locker had been replaced by a more sophisticated Torsen unit. You could still opt to engage a rear differential lock, but electronics overrode that at 15 m.p.h.. That change was indicative of movement in the marketplace and where the B3 was aimed – slightly more upscale from the B2. Interior quality was greater, safety took priority, and production was broken into two categories as it had been in Europe for the B2. Selecting the top-range 90 quattro got you nicer BBS wheels, color matched bumpers and mirrors, a sportier raised spoiler, a better leather interior and wood trim. The downscale 80 would channel more of the outgoing 4000, with a velour and plastic-heavy interior. They even opted to keep the same Ronal R8 wheels as the old model early on, and the subtle rear spoiler was a near copy of the B2.

The more basic 80 was closer in performance to the 4000, too – the luxury and safety items of the B3 meant more weight, and the 90 tipped the scales at nearly 3,000 lbs. Mechanically identical, the 80 quattro was about a hundred pounds lighter and anyone who has driven 80s normally aspirated Audis knows that 100 lbs. makes a difference in performance. Motivation for both was the same NG-code inline-5 that was seen in the last Coupe GT Special Build models, meaning 130 horsepower and 140 lb.ft of torque – smoothly adequate, but certainly never overwhelming. The 80 quattro enjoyed only a short run in the U.S., being available in the 1988-1990 model years and then re-introduced with some 90 quattro upgrades for the ’92 model year as a hold-over until the V6 B4 was ready for production. The de-contented 80 was a fair bit cheaper than its quite expensive brethren; while a Coupe Quattro would set you back over $30,000 with some options, select a basic 80 quattro and you could sneak out of the dealership for $23,000 – barely more than the ’87 Coupe GT retailed for. Today I’ve come across what must be one of the best 80 quattros remaining out there:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Audi 80 quattro on eBay

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1977 Audi 100LS with 30,000 Miles

The Audi C1 may have introduced the United States to the concept of a large, luxurious…well, Volkswagen…but time hasn’t exactly been kind to its legacy. Every time one comes up for sale, immediately stories will emerge of how one caught on fire, or left someone stranded, or was difficult to maintain, or just plain broke and was left to die. From a generation where cars rarely reached 100,000 miles before their untimely death, the 100 was an interesting addition to the range of German cars available to the public, though not particularly memorable for anything innovative, unique, or superlative. Yet they signaled a new direction for Volkswagen’s range, and would go on to be an important part of establishing Audi’s foothold in the market.

The new B-range and C-range cars ostensibly replaced the NSU offerings like the 1967 TT, and Neckarsulm plant formed the backbone of the new production. Because of their visual similarity to the storied Mercedes-Benz W123, many often believe Audi just copied the Daimler design; however, when the W123 rolled out for production, the C1 was nearly done and due to be replaced with the C2 only two years later. Married with Porsche dealerships, the new Audi products sold remarkably well, especially considering their pricing. At nearly $8,000 in the mid-70s, you weren’t far off the established norm of American luxury cars like the Lincoln Continental. But this car didn’t have the features, or the ‘Murican V8, of those hulks. Still, Audi dealers managed to sell an impressive 146,583 before the new C2 5000 took over in the 1977-1978 model year.

Few of these 100LSs have survived the test of time, because for so long they’ve been considered an also-ran. For some time a friend of mine had arguably the nicest one in the United States, and he couldn’t sell it in the mid-single digits. Then last year something strange just a few weeks ago. His exact car sold at auction for $17,750. Has the world gone crazy? It’s no surprise that, immediately following that auction, here comes another pristine survivor 100LS:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Audi 100LS on eBay

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1983 BMW 320is

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Today we have a nearly immaculate survivor of the best E21 model BMW brought to America. With some handling and cosmetic upgrades, the 320is was a tidy little package. It’s amazing that after 32 years and 117k miles this Hennarot example looks as showroom fresh as it does. The paint, chrome, interior, engine bay, and even the toolkit all look virtually unused. The E21 generation has its own distinct charm, a bit more quaint than the E30 but still a playful little sports sedan, and this is among the best examples we’ve seen.

Click for details: 1983 BMW 320is on eBay

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Survivor Status: 1963 Volkswagen Beetle

I’ve been scanning the ads lately for good examples of the car many of us began our love affair with German vehicles, the Volkswagen Beetle. We saw a nice 1962 Beetle Cabriolet last week that was lightly modified. This week we have come across a 1963 Beetle in Virginia that is all original. Purchased new in Florida, this car had but one owner until recently and comes with lots of documentation to add to its provenance.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1963 Volkswagen Beetle on eBay

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Feature Listing Updates – New Lower Prices on Survivor GTi and Low Mile Corrado

The seller of the two recent fan-favorite Volkswagens has been in touch and lowered the price on both offerings; the GTi is now listed at $6,500 and the Corrado is listed at $12,500. He’s included links to more photos on each car, as well.

You can contact the seller if you’re interested directly at jimmyzslc@yahoo.com.

Click Here For The GTI Post

Year: 1984
Model: GTi
Engine: 1.8 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 104,500 mi
Price: $6,500

Click Here For Additional GTI Photos

Click Here For The Corrado Post

Year: 1992
Model: Corrado SLC
Engine: 2.8 liter VR6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,750 mi
Price: $12,500

Click Here For Additional Corrado Photos

-Carter

1982 BMW 320is with 37,000 Miles

I’ve recently been on a bit of a kick enjoying the looks of the BBS Mahle wheels. I’m not entirely sure why they appeal more to me today than they did last week, or last year, or even when my father had a set on his 1982 BMW 633CSi two decades ago. Then, I felt they looked outdated and undersized and really preferred the looks of the RS wheels he later placed on the CSi; but there’s a certain purity about the original design that I really like. Generally associated with the E9 and E24 models, the BBS Mahle wheels also made an appearance on the E21 320is. Today’s example is stunning in Henna Red with claimed original condition and lower mileage; but does that support the high asking price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 BMW 320is on eBay

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1981 Volkswagen Scirocco

The Volkswagen Scirocco was a clean design when it was originally launched, and in my mind is even cleaner today. The pretty simplicity of the design really sets it apart from the more recent offerings from pretty much every car manufacturer. While the Scirocco was never intended to be a race car or scorch you with light-your-hair-on-fire performance it is a neat package that combined a pretty Italian design with reliable German underpinnings. Three decades on, finding these cars in any state is pretty rare – but especially rare in the state we find this 1981 Scirocco today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Volkswagen Scirocco on VWVortex.com

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1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Diesel Survivor

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It seems that a lot of the cars we know and love from the 1980s have been taking flight when it comes to values. Whether it’s the ubiquitous E30 M3 or the 4000S Quattro that sold for over $12,000 yesterday, it’s apparent that the this era has now evolved into classic territory for us thirtysomething folks who remember these machines fondly from our youth. This 1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Diesel for sale in Maryland might not have the pace and cache of the Mk1 Rabbit GTI, but it’s an honest to goodness survivor sure to please the Volkswagen enthusiast.

Click for more details: 1980 Volkswagen Rabbit Diesel Survivor on TheSamba

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