All posts tagged 1984

Seeing Red: Audi 4000 quattro Roundup

The Audi 4000 quattro was like a Sherpa to thousands of European car enthusiasts; a steadfast winter standby with slick styling and Rally-bred sure-footedness. On paper, looking back today the 4000 was probably a bit dull; nearly 2,900 lbs of brick-on-brick design with a measly 115 horsepower motivation. But numbers don’t tell the whole story of the B2 Audi, because in any configuration it’s a great handling car. The quattro, however, had some special features that would have been headline items for any sports sedan until very recently; four wheel independent suspension with a large front sway bar and four wheel disc brakes. Couple that with the first all-wheel drive system fitted to a small car, sprinkle some luxury items in and cut the price of the exotic Quattro in half, and it didn’t matter that it wasn’t particularly fast. What the 4000 quattro was, though, was one solid all-around performer. The subtle changes from the front-drive sedan resulted in a car that felt more grown-up and refined, yet still pushed you to do silly Hoonigan things. 4000 quattro owners that I’ve talked to almost always have the same proud story; the time that they managed to get their 4000 quattro stuck. Normally, that would be a cause for embarrassment, but such was the grip of the plow-through-anything small sedan that it became a badge of honor when you outdid the car’s twin-locking differentials. The secret, of course, was just to make sure all four wheels were in the air! But because of this type of sillyness inducing competence amongst dropping residual value and a second or third tier of ownership that didn’t always repair or maintain the cars, few are left in good condition. However, I managed to scratch together a trio of three-quarters of the U.S. bound production years, all in the fetching shade of Tornado Red. We’ll start with the end of the run:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS quattro on eBay

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1984 Volkswagen GTi

Just the other day I caught the Wheeler Dealer episode where they restored a Mk.1 GTi. For me it was a trip down memory lane; my GTi also suffered the electronic woes and shift linkage problems that the one on the show did. Unfortunately for me, I was not nearly as talented a mechanic as Mr. China is – resulting ultimately in the end of my ownership of the now-legendary car. Of course, when I owned it they were still throw-away cars – while people liked seeing them, no one really considered them particularly collectable in the 1990s. However, since then clean and unmolested original GTis have steadily increased in value to the point where we’ve documented a few examples north of $15,000. Those were exceptions to the rule, though – we’ve also seen nice original condition cars struggle to make even half that amount. Today’s example seems to lie in the middle; clean and mostly original, lower mile and good condition with a $9,500 asking price:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen GTi on eBay

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1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL

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Today’s Jetta hits a lot of chords for me: Mk1, brown, adorably original, and some feel-good history. It’s been owned by the seller twice, once after he bought it from the original owner, then again when he bought it back after an unappreciative snot didn’t like the manual car his parents got him for college. It’s covered over 180k miles (the odometer broke a little while back) but still wins at shows because it’s in beautiful shape. Cars like this little survivor are my kind of classic – no fancy, climate-controlled exotic, just a loved example of a great, simple car.

Click for details: 1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL on eBay

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1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I don’t tend to post a lot of modified 911s, in part because usually we come across plenty of interesting and original examples to showcase, but mostly because they can be notoriously difficult to evaluate from afar (and some are downright terrible). Those that I do feature tend to fall into the realm of the restomod, but from time to time I come across something that piques my interest too much to pass by. Here we have a 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa that had fallen into a somewhat poor state, but has now been restored and rebuilt though without concern for returning the car entirely to its original condition. The drivetrain remains more or less how it came from the factory, but the aesthetics have been changed quite a bit, and overall it looks very good. Typically, restorations like this focus on the long-hood design, but it’s interesting to see how a similar ethos can be carried over and applied to a 3.2 Carrera all the while retaining much of the original look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

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1984 Volkswagen Jetta GLI

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I love the Mk1 Jetta, funky little sedan that it is. While later Jettas are quite common in the states, the Golf/GTI is far more common from the first generation. Just as the US market dictated the production of the new A3 sedan (meh), in the late ’70s VW realized the ‘Muricans liked trunks and didn’t have as tight of parking restrictions, so they grafted on a third box. The GLI was a one-year special, bringing most of the GTI’s upgrades. International preferences aside, that made for a pretty great little sedan.

While today’s description nearly landed it in the Friday Fail section, the car itself is nice enough to pull it back to positivity-land. The Euro bumpers and Zender lip add to the 80s flair, and there has clearly been some decent attention to making it run as well as it looks. It’s especially attractive without the roof racks and on the upsized RML Snowflakes, but unfortunately those don’t come with the car. The buyer would do well to get rid of the included wheels as soon as possible and get some form of snowflakes – even OEMs would look great. Best of all, in the end it’s a high-mileage, Mk1 Volkswagen, which means the price isn’t going anywhere crazy.

Click for details: 1984 Volkswagen Jetta GLI on eBay

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