1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD


The last few W126 Mercedes-Benz I looked have fell more towards the collector car status in this 1987 300SDL with an outstanding interior and this nearly perfect 1987 560SEL. Today’s W126, a 1984 300SD for sale in California, isn’t one of those cream puff cars but it is far from a beaten up example either. This OM617 S-Class has just enough miles where you don’t feel bad about piling on some more but not too many where you feel like an engine overhaul is around the corner. Finished in Lapis Blue with gray leather this 300SD could be the perfect daily driver. What do you think?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD on eBay

1984 Volkswagen GTI

We’ve had plenty of Volkswagen A1 chassis to look at recently, from the neat Jetta Turbo Diesel we’ll be seeing again soon through the string of very awesome Sciroccos from both the first and second generation. I’ve also looked at quite a few GTIs, from the second, third and fourth generation. But for all that love, I’ve somehow managed to avoid combining the two and covering what is arguably the most famous modern Volkswagen – the original GTI.

Today I hope to rectify that with today’s last-year example of what many consider to be the original ‘hot hatch’. While the U.S. example was somewhat watered-down and had chunkier styling than the truly Spartan 1976 design, it was still a revelation in performance and universally heralded as the benchmark by which all other sporty economy cars would be based moving forward. At a time when there were few do-it-all type cars, the GTI managed to be nearly all things to all people; it got good fuel economy thanks to a relatively miserly 1.8 liter inline-4 with efficient fuel injection. It looked neat, thanks to 14″ alloy wheels, wide fender flared and blacked-out detail work with red accent stripes. It was functional and flexible, with fold-down seats and a (for its size) spacious hatch area to transport goods. It was usable year-round, with front-wheel drive allowing for decent snow traction. And the sport suspension, heavily bolstered seats and close-ratio transmission made the whole package an athletic alternative to the norm, allowing practical-minded men and women to fling their family car through corners with aplomb. Near universal was its appeal, and infectious were the ad campaigns, which in the Volkswagen tradition used short phrases to capture attention like “They’re going fast” and “Serious Fun” – even the oft-used “It’s a wolf in sheep’s clothing”.…

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with 9,373 Miles

Ah the fabled barn find. It’s the stuff of legend in the vintage car world and it seems like no prestigious auction goes by without a car or two crossing the blocks under such a designation. I can’t say they’re necessarily the type of thing I look for – after all these are more or less neglected cars – but I will admit they can make for some very interesting discoveries. Take the 964 3.8 RSR auctioned last May, or the 1973 911 Carrera RSH I opened the year with as examples. Finds like those truly are legendary.

This one isn’t properly a barn find since it was sitting in a garage intended for housing the owner’s car collection, but it possesses most of the typical ‘barn find’ attributes, right down to a heavy coating of dust. This is a one-owner 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Chicago, with a mere 9,373 miles on it. It’s been cleaned up and provided with servicing to refresh a good deal of the neglected materials and now sits looking not too different from how it left the showroom.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

It isn’t always easy to tell if a car is a worthwhile example. Sometimes sellers just don’t do a great job of showcasing what they are selling and we’re left to piece together the details to develop a fuller picture than what we are provided. On the bright side, that also can lead to better pricing as fewer buyers/bidders show interest in the car.

I think the first part of all of that applies to this car. Whether the second point also will apply won’t be known until auction end, but at the moment it appears to be the case as well. Here we have a Quartz Grey Metallic 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe, located in Florida, with Tan interior and 79,500 miles on it. The pictures provide a somewhat incomplete picture, especially of the interior, but as I look at it I can’t help but think it looks in really nice shape.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL Turbo Diesel

As we saw with the Dasher Hatchback from last week, just because it’s older and in good shape doesn’t automatically mean it’s worth a lot. If it’s a GTI or a Scirocco, sure – sit back with the popcorn and watch the bids roll in, but that Dasher? It sold for $1,600. Admittedly, it needed at least that amount and probably more in mechanical freshening, but still – you’re looking at a unique classic for well under $5,000 all in.

Today is another such beast, and like the Dasher, it’s a niche car that most will probably pass over for the more exciting metal. But this is one trick little bit of kit as you look a little closer. A1 Jettas are pretty rare to begin with, and this is a claimed rust-free example – always a good place to start. Euro bumpers slim down the look while Corrado Sebrings and a lowered ride height beef it up, but the clean presentation is really highlighted by the rare drivetrain – the CY turbocharged diesel inline-4 mated to a 5-speed manual transmission, good for 68 horsepower and 98 lb.ft of torque. This motor was also briefly available in the first generation Audi 4000. The 10.6 quoted 0-60 time won’t sound particularly exciting, but it was quite a bit quicker than the standard diesel and recorded better fuel economy (Volkswagen claimed it could top 54 mpg!). But the key to this car is the relative obscurity and rarity of the package.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen Jetta GL Turbo Diesel on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1984 Porsche 930 RUF BTR Conversion

The last two weeks we’ve looked at the wilder side of the Porsche tuner world with cars from Gemballa and RWB. This week we’ll go a little more traditional with the styling and make a return to RUF. RUF likely is the most well known and highly regarded in the Porsche world, so much so that RUF is not just a tuner, but a manufacturer utilizing blank Porsche chassis for its cars. In some ways, RUF is the inverse of RWB. Where RWB goes over the top with styling and leaves the performance mostly alone, RUF keeps the styling changes somewhat minimal (at least from the perspective of how much they depart from a 911 itself) and goes over the top with performance upgrades. Over the years they’ve produced some blistering fast machines capable of competing with the best cars in the world. Even capable of competing with the likes of Porsche’s own 959.

The one we see the most often is the BTR and that’s just what we have here. However, this is not one of the very rare RUF VIN BTRs, but one of the more common converted examples, which in this case was based off of a 1984 Porsche 930. That’s a nice base with which to begin and with the RUF upgrades you get a car that can make even the prodigious 930 seem tame.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 930 RUF BTR on eBay

Year: 1984
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.4 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 35,014 mi
Price: $225,000 Buy It Now

1984 Porsche 930 RUF BTR DOCUMENTED

This remarkable example has remained unrestored and original until today. Only 35k miles and 2 owners since new this 930 is in beautiful condition! Full RUF BTR conversion with letter of authenticity from RUF, this 1984 Porsche 930 is not your average 911 Turbo.

1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD with 11,300 miles

File this one under another great Mercedes-Benz that you usually see with hundreds of thousands of miles on but for whatever reason has almost none. This 1984 300SD shows a crazy 11,300 miles and looks every bit the part. You can totally see why people plunked down almost $40,000 (over $93,000 in 2017 dollars) for these when they are new. It’s frugal, handsome, secure, has enough to power to get out of its own way and all this won’t cost you a fortune to keep going. Except this car, as you might have guessed, will need a small fortune to take home with you.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD on Mercedes Heritage

Year: 1984
Model: 300SD
Engine: 3.0 liter 5 cylinder
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 11,300 miles
Price: $35,000

Single owner SD through 2015.
Rare 904 Midnight Blue with Creme leather.
Spectacular preservation from new.
Spotless engine bay.
Full handbooks.
Runs and drives beautifully.

What is there to say about this car? I overwhelmingly prefer the gen 1 (1981-1985) W126s over the later ones even though they do look a little more dated, but I think that’s the beauty of them. Give me a clean set of 14 inch Bundts with a OM617 and I’m as satisfied as I can possibly be in owning a car. This is a great color combination with the Midnight Blue and tan interior even with those terrible North America spec headlights.

Like I said, all this is going to cost you. $35,000 is a ton of money for any W126 but it’s tough to fault the seller for asking it. The market for clean golden-era Mercedes diesels isn’t slowing down but I wouldn’t bet on this car gaining anymore value once you start driving it. As I’ve said before, miles don’t scare me one bit so I’m really not the guy that this car appeals to.…

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

It’s summer, which means plenty of warmth, plenty of sunshine, and plenty of outdoor activities. All of that is great. In my part of the world it also means plenty of humidity and the best way to counter humidity is airflow. Fans and breezes definitely are the order of the day. And on a car what better what to increase air flow than by removing the top!

With these things in mind I present this very pretty Venetian Blue Metallic 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Georgia, with Marina Blue interior and 71,555 miles on it. This color combination is a really attractive one and has a very summer feel about it with its mix of blues. And, of course, the top comes down allowing you to better enjoy that warm weather.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

Year: 1984
Model: 911 Carrera Cabriolet
Engine: 3.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 71,555 mi
Price: $45,900 Buy It Now

1984 Porsche 911 Cabriolet.

Vin WP0EB0913ES170666.

71,555 Miles.

Venetian Blue.

Marina Blue Leather Interior.

Clean Carfax.

Books, Manuals, 2 keys, Tonneau Cover, Tools, Spare and a Jack.

This great looking 3.2-liter Cabriolet comes in a very appealing Venetian Blue on Marina Blue Leather Interior.

Both the exterior and interior are in a superb condition, and the car glistens on the road!

Mechanically, the car is very solid. The 3.2-litre engine has great output and pulls strong like a Porsche motor should. The 915 gearbox does not miss a beat and the synchros in every gear feel good. The clutch engages properly and does not stick. The car handles excellent, and the brakes stop straight and true. The Fuchs wheels have been reconditioned, and are fitted with brand new Sumitomo HTR A/S tires.

1984 Audi Coupe GT

Like the 1984 Audi 4000S quattro, the 1984 Audi Coupe GT was a bit of an odd bird in the U.S. market. The GT was a light revision of the earlier Coupe; the major difference that was noticeable immediately was the Quattro-inspired 14″ Ronal R8 wheel design and raised spoiler shared with its bigger brother. Coupled with the deep chin spoiler and 4-quad headlight design, the Coupe GT introduced in mid-1983 looked like a fitting tribute to the turbocharged halo model.

Power now came from a 2.1 liter inline-5 (code WE) which cranked out 100 horsepower. Matching its European “5S” counterpart, the U.S. spec GT got an overdrive 5-speed manual with a 4.90 final drive; it helped economy slightly, though the slab front end certainly didn’t. But the new close(r) ratio box over the early economy-minded 5 speed helped acceleration little. Despite the lightweight 2,500 lb curbweight, Audi claimed the GT could hit 60 in a little over 10 seconds and it was out of fizz at about 109 mph. Despite this rather tame performance for a ‘Grand Tourer’, the GT’s numbers were on par with the GTI and better than the Scirocco. Plus, the longitudinal engine layout with equal length driveshafts coupled with a longer wheel base made them quite fun to drive.

But what was really unique about these cars was that they were an intermediary; the end of the Type 81 Coupes before the Type 85 Coupe GTs launched with heavy revision and more power (along with bigger brakes) for 1985. So while the later Coupes were basically a front-drive quattro, the 83-84 Coupe GT was like a 5-cylinder powered VW in some ways. They retained the smaller 4×100 mm bolt circle on the hubs with 239mm (9.4″) front disc brakes and rear drums, which is a blessing for wheel and brake upgrades should you want to go that route.…

1984 Volkswagen GTI

As far as owning a legendary automobile goes, does it get much more affordable than the Volkswagen GTI? I don’t think it does. Universally lauded as one of the great all time designs and driving experiences, a trans-formative automobile that redefined (and forever defined) the marketplace, a practical pocket rocket, the GTI is not a million, nor even a hundred-thousand dollar car.

The asking price here is $12,995.

For that money, it’s true that money could buy you a new car. No, I’m not joking; the base price for the 2017 Nissan Versa S is 11,990. After destination, that comes to $12,855. Let’s call it even. So where is your money better spent?

The GTI produced about 90 horsepower from its 1.8 liter inline-4. The Nissan makes 109 horsepower from a 1.6. And, it’s got dual cams to impress all the chicks.

The GTI had options such as air conditioning and a radio. On the Nissan, they’re standard. Plus you apparently don’t need hands to operate them (or, Nissan gives you free hands? Whatever.) The base Versa has manual windows and locks, just like the GTI.

Volkswagen claimed the GTI could pip 36 mpg, which I’m pretty sure was a lie given that my ’84 turned about 5,000 rpms at highway speed. The Versa S you just bought is claimed to get…you guessed it, 36 mpg in 5-speed form.

Curb weight on the GTI was about 2,200 lbs with some options. The Nissan’s curb weight is 2,390 lbs. (seriously, I found this pretty shocking. I was unaware that a modern car could be made under 2,500 lbs unless it was completely carbon fiber)

You’d be equally unlikely to survive a major crash in either. But the Nissan comes with self-inflating fluffy pillows hidden in various spots of the dashboard.…