Learning From Our Past with a Refreshed Look at GCFSB

In January of this year we tried on a new theme for GCFSB. Our goal was to update the look of the site while improving usability on desktop and mobile devices. That effort wasn’t entirely successful and in less than a year we’ve decided to go back to a more traditional blog layout. Fans of the pre-2017 theme will likely feel right at home with intro summaries and links directly to auctions listings available right from the home page.

As always we deeply appreciate the support from our readers, sellers, and industry partners. Please use the comments area below to leave your feedback, and we’ll do our best to accommodate.

dc…

Motorsports Monday: 1968 BMW 2002 IMSA RS

The end of Summer has many traditions; the days wane as children head back to school. Temperatures fall as families head towards apple orchards and plan for haunted hay rides. Pumpkin spice is everywhere. But there’s one tradition I’ve particularly enjoyed for the last few years; the live stream from West Sussex, England of the Goodwood Revival.

For me, a lover of vintage cars and especially vintage race cars, it’s a special treat. Both of the events put on by Lord March are impressive in their own right, and if you want to see a little bit of everything the season opener Festival of Speed is probably the venue you should consider. But if you want to see cars and motorcycles from periods you weren’t even alive for race flat-out, the Revival is the one to tune in to. Heavily modified Jaguars, Ferraris, Aston-Martins, and just about everything in between head to the track as combinations of professional and amateur drivers (at least, those with quite deep pockets) take their prized possessions to the limit and sometimes beyond. You might be lucky enough once in your life to witness an original GT40 in person; head to the Revival, and you’ll run across a dozen or so of the model, many of which are driven nearly as quickly as they were originally. This is coupled with period livery and dress on one of the fastest circuits in England, filmed with some of the best cameras out there. The result, as a car lover, is one of the most evocative spectacles conceivable.

Each time I witness a Goodwood event, my love of these race-prepared vintage cars is re-inspired. And though this particular BMW 2002 is just a few years too new to be eligible for competition at the Goodwood circuit, it caught my attention because of the claimed IMSA link.…

New Look for GermanCarsForSaleBlog.com


Good morning,

As you’ve probably noticed, we’ve made some changes at GCFSB!  Most noticeably is a new theme for the site, which has a much more contemporary and visually engaging homepage.  It also scales well for different screen sizes, such as tablet viewing.  What hasn’t changed is the same great enthusiast writing in each selection made by our talented crew – you guys rock!

We have also elevated our Featured Listings in the layout.  This serves to highlight cars for sale by those who are supporting the site with a paid post.  For 2017, we offer Feature Listings for $59 per 3 months.  We only select very good to excellent examples for this service, and they are often being sold by our most faithful readers.  Thank you very much for supporting the site!  Do you have a special car that would benefit from getting an enthusiast write up, posted in front of our annual 500k viewers, 25k+ Facebook fans, and over 1,000 savvy email subscribers?  Shoot us an email to see if your car qualifies:  germancarsforsaleblog@gmail.com

Along the same lines, we have been receiving interest from specialty brokers and dealers reaching out to us for exposure as well.  We would be eager to talk further with parties about site sponsorship to replace our generic banner ads.

Please feel free to share your feedback on our recent changes by directly emailing, or leaving a comment on this post.  Thank you very much for reading as we celebrate over 8 years online and look forward in blogging the most interesting German Cars For Sale!

Sincerely,
Dan Crouch

*Please note that GermanCarsForSaleBlog.com do not represent any cars listed for sale on the site and all posts express our enthusiast opinion only.

1986 Ford RS200

Now, before you start shouting at your screen that there’s a blue oval appearing here, I’m aware that Ford is an American-based company. I could go into theatrics about how we’re actually speaking a form of German to attempt to rationalize a Ford appearing on these pages, or I could point out that Henry Ford was awarded the Grand Cross of the Supreme Order of the German Eagle on his 75th birthday – the only American to ever receive this award. Of course, that and Ford’s inclusion in Mein Kampf probably aren’t highlights in the storied history of the family or the company. But it does point towards Ford’s reach across the globe, and indeed the European branch of Ford is Ford of Europe AG, headquartered in Cologne, Germany. If that still isn’t German enough for you, let’s just say that once in a while something that’s partly non-German pops up that we’d like to cover. While usually that’s a Swedish car, today it’s a Ford. But this isn’t just any Ford, okay?

The RS200 was conceived in a world for a world that, by the time it came to fruition, no longer existed. Built to maximize the Group B rules, Ford spanned Europe looking for the best talent to make the RS200 a winner. The body of the car was Italian in design but assembled in France. The chassis and engine designs were perfected by Formula 1 aces in England. It was a winning formula that unfortunately was launched at an time of unprecedented speed and power in the World Rally Championship; a combination that proved deadly. Barely into competition, the FIA changed the governing rules in the WRC and immediately the RS200 was shelved. The result was a few hundred competition ready cars that were hugely expensive with nothing to compete in.…

Le GLi: 1989 Peugeot 309 GTI

Let’s suspend our rules of engagement at GCFSB for a post and look towards Germany’s western neighbor, France. While we write up a Swede from time to time, it’s not often that French cars make our blog. But since the Franks, who established rule over France under the Merovingians in the late 400s, were actually a Germanic tribe, let’s make an exception and consider this listing. Being a fan of European cars, it’s not often that I get stumped by one – but in my normal searches I came across the front end of what appeared, at first, to be a Peugeot 205 GTI. The 205 is perhaps the car that out-GTI’d the original GTi, better handling, awesome looks and more speed meant it’s become as legendary as the car credited with starting the market segment. But it didn’t look quite right, and a closer inspection revealed it was in fact the bigger brother of the 205; the 309. In GTI trim, they mimicked the recipe started by Volkswagen; turn up the engine, lower the suspension, fit larger alloys and of course stick red accents and “GTI” badges everywhere. Producing 120 horsepower and with low weight, these were fairly potent hatchbacks in their day:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Peugeot 309 GTI on eBay

1994 Porsche 968

The Porsche 911 could be described as the eternal sports car. It has a style all its own that has lasted for over fifty years, albeit with some refinements along the way. The Porsche 968, however, looks like it could have been designed yesterday. I never stop thinking about what the Porsche 928 and 968 might have turned into, had Porsche continued on with their transaxle greats which exited stage left in 1995. These are cars that deserved a second life and had plenty of fans, to which the folks over at flüssig magazine can attest. This 1994 968 for sale in Florida was originally sold by Brumos Porsche and has covered just over 80,000 miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 968 on Pelican Parts

Wednesday Wheels Roundup

Time for another edition of Wednesday Wheels and another peek around the interwebs looking for some neat wheels. This week we have a rare set of Remotec intended for Mercedes-Benz models from the 1980s; they’d look great on a period 500SEC in my mind. Next are a very odd set of Crimson twin-wheels intended for Porsche 911s, apparently. Why? Great question. Redeeming myself partially, I have a set of OZ-made Carlsson wheels that are simply stunning. They’d really look fantastic on an Audi S4 or E500. Finally, rounding things out are a set of Rays Gram Light wheels originally bought for an Audi S4. They’re an unusual choice but mimic the original Quattro’s Ronal R8s. Which are your favorite?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Remotec 5×112 16×8 Wheels on eBay

1996 Volkswagen Passat GLX TDi Variant

Something really strange happened to me about a decade ago; I got old. Sure, part of it was the numeric figure I associated with my age, but the bigger problem was that I had a job that I was paying the gas bills for, and I needed to drive – a lot. I was adding between 45,000 and 55,000 miles a year to the odometers (when they were working). My preferred mode of transport to that point was Audis, and while they were quirky, fun, and neat looking compared to a Kia, the fuel mileage was nothing to write home about. My 200 Quattro Avant struggled to get 25 m.p.g., and my V8? If I could manage 20, that was a good day. So, despite my desires for a high performance steed, increasingly as gas prices rose my thoughts kept shifting towards how I could maximize my fuel mileage. One thought I had was to take something like the 200 and swap in a TDi drivetrain. Would it be slow? Sure, it wouldn’t be nearly as quick – but the prospect of 40 plus m.p.g. was infinitely appealing to easing my multi-thousand dollar gas bills. It seems I wasn’t alone in my thinking:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Volkswagen Passat GLX TDi on eBay

2002 Audi S6 Avant 6-speed

The other day it seemed as though I switched sides, abandoning my preferred Audis for the dark star of Mercedes-Benz with the E55 AMG Estate. Don’t get me wrong, I do like the S6 Avant, but perhaps the lack of manual and the mere existence of the hotter and not-for-U.S. market RS6 Avant just takes the edge of the C5 for me. Plus, the transmissions in the Audis are notorious – correctly or incorrectly – for being a bit weak and expensive to replace. The solution? A 6-speed manual converted car, of course! And this particular example even steps up above that single massive advantage with a host of RS6 upgrades as well:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Audi S6 Avant on eBay

1967 BMW 2000CS

If you like the classic BMW E9 coupe, odds are that you also think the earlier New Class Coupe is pretty awesome too. Granted, some don’t appreciate the more delicate look of the 4-cylinder big pillarless coupe, but most of the design features that Wilhelm Hofmeister penned into the 2000C and 2000CS were directly translated into the E9 coupe. That means, of course, that the design language was effectively the same for over twenty years until the last of the similar designs – the E24 – finally left production in 1989. Even then, the “Hofmeister Kink” remained a styling cue that was incorporated into the new designs from Munich. The 2000CS, though, held some unique details such as the front end which looked distinctly different than the models that followed. Shared with some of the New Class sedans, the dual beam lights hid behind a glass cover – something that wouldn’t occur again until the 1990s. But the profile was classic BMW coupe; a long hood and delicate A and C pillars with plenty of glass along with a sharply cut tail. Squint, and you can still see some details that are incorporated even into modern BMWs:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 BMW 2000CS on eBay