1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe

The 911SC remains one of my favorite Porsche models. It played an important role in the 911 establishing itself as the premier sports car in the Porsche lineup and without it this iconic rear-engine performer may have gone the way of Porsche’s many other former models. It also presents good value among the air-cooled line. While they played an important historical role, their relative simplicity has kept values down compared with some of the other models. So you can still get a good classic 911 in original condition without spending too much.

Or those values can allow you to follow another route. The 911SC becomes a canvas to build the 911 of your own. Along with the 3.2 Carrera these are the most commonly modified Porsches we see. However, unlike the Carrera, which builders tend to use as their foundation for building pretty highly priced back-dated 911s attempting to replicate the heroic Carrera RS of the past, the 911SC can be found in a wider variety of builds and generally much lower prices. It seems regardless of where they end up the 911SC keeps those values lower.

That’s more or less the situation with this 911SC. The owner bought it a couple years ago and began to transform it. The overall look is quite different, but it still maintains the basics that make it identifiable as one of these ’80s 911s. I’m not sure the price is quite right, but it’s not nearly as egregiously high as many of the Carrera builds we see. I think it provides a point we can work with.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

1961 Porsche 356B T5 Reutter Coupe

I’m not going to pretend to be intimately familiar with the Porsche hot rod culture of California, especially as it relates to the 356 since that’s well before my time, but we’ve come across a few of these cars over the years and this one seems to be by far the best one I’ve seen. The general look of the various modifications seems near perfect for the genre and the overall condition is fantastic. Slate Grey over Red makes for just the right color combination for such a car. Even though most any 356 probably would not truly be considered quick by today’s standards, I can imagine this one would be a hoot to drive. Perhaps even better: it is up for auction with no reserve so someone is taking this home!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1961 Porsche 356B T5 Reutter Coupe on eBay

Year: 1961
Model: 356B
Engine: 1.9 liter flat-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 75,886 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

1961 Porsche 356B (T5B) Reutter Coupe

“Porsche Werks meets SoCal Hot Rod”

SHOW/DRIVER
(COND #2+)

356 Concour Dana Point Class Winner
356 Club Magazine Cover Car

75886 Original Miles
(since factory delivery)
30000 Since Restoration 20 Years Ago
10,000 Since D&I Refreshen

VIN # 115128

Southern CA YELLOW PLATE’s
(matched pair)

Slate Gray
Red Interior
Charcoal Square Weave
Factory Style Round Headrests
Unaltered Dash
Period Correct Nardi Mushroom Steering Wheel
Red 4-Point Racing Style Seat Belts
Fully Removable Custom Made Roll Bar
(still uses factory interior and back seat unlike factory roll bar)

1904cc 912 bored to 90.5mm
Completely Rebuild w/ NeuTek Cam
Full Flow Oil Filter
External Oil Cooler
Crankcase Breather System
Internally Modified Stock Muffler
w/Twin 912 Chrome Tips
Aux Electric Fuel Pump
Modified 4-Speed Transmission
w/ taller 2nd, 3rd & 4th

Weltmeister Front Sway Bar
Vic Skimants’ Camber Regulator Rear
Factory Alloy Drum Brakes
w/ Ferodo Shoes

GT Style Through-Hood Fuel Filler
Shaved Hood Handle
Deco Strips
Rear Bumper Side Depressions
Engine Lid Louvers
Chrome Nerf Bar Bumpers
Hella 128 Fog Lamps
Driving Lights
Wire Headlight Screens
Fender Mounted Spun Aluminum Talbot GT Junior Mirrors
Pre-A Style “Shine Down” License Plate Light
w/ Third Brake Light

American Racing Empi 5-Spoke Style Wheels
Bridgestone Potenza 195/65/15 Tires

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1973 Porsche 911T

With an entry-level car comes entry-level performance and appearance, two things that many people might seek to change. On a performance coupe like the 911 such desires become even more understandable and it’s easy to find a wide variety of builds with just such an objective in mind. Many of the high-end builds have used the 964 chassis and running gear as the foundation for designing a car with vintage 911 looks, but modern 911 performance. Yet, we also see builds work in the other direction, taking one of the early 911s as its foundation and then fitting the engine, transmission, and suspension from a later model in order to complete the package. Such builds are somewhat more rare given the very high value attached to an original long-hood 911, but when no longer in original condition perhaps it begins to make more sense. Here is one such build: a Silver Metallic 1973 Porsche 911T, located in Georgia, with a rare 3.1 liter flat-six from an early 911SC mated to a 915 5-speed transmission. The body has been fitted with RS flares to give it a more aggressive look and the interior has received minor revisions in the guise of the early 911 outlaw builds.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911T on eBay

Motorsports Monday RS Style: 1979 and 1987 Porsche 911s

It goes without saying that the Porsche 911 is one of the most popular modified chassis ever conceived, and a fair amount of those modifications are track-based. The results are sometimes mixed; however, one of the more popular trends which I think is pretty slick is backdating 911s. It’s ironic, since for some time it was more popular to update the looks of many of the older race cars to new 964 or 993 bodies. However, the surge in pricing in the 1960s and 1970s 911 market has resulted in many backdated cars coming to market. Obviously, the advantage is that you get a better driving and more powerful car with more options than original, but it’s got the look of the sought after early models. However, probably the biggest advantage is that of price; with a lower entry cost, prospective buyers aren’t afraid to use the 911 where it is well suited; driving fast on a race track. Today I have two different takes on backdated 911s, both with a nod towards the mega-buck RS model. Which is the one you’d choose?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay

1974 Porsche 911S – Lightweight Outlaw

We’ve featured a few cars of similar intent to the one we see here and they are always difficult to gauge, but one of the persistent criticisms of those cars, especially considering the asking price many sellers seek, is that most of them have retained their stock drivetrain. Given the 911 market, there are cogent reasons for those build decisions as cosmetic details can be reverted to their stock configuration, whereas a car without its engine will never be wholly original again. One solution is to use a 911 with a relatively unloved drivetrain and replace it with something more desirable. This build followed that route utilizing a 1974 911S as its foundation and replacing its 2.7 liter flat-six with the 3.6 liter engine from a 993. Transmission, braking, and suspension received similar upgrades and the interior has been stripped and rebuilt with only the essentials leaving a spartan environment that appears bare but well sorted. With a reported 2550 lb weight this is sure to be screamer and for the well-heeled might make for a very interesting track car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911S – Lightweight Outlaw on eBay

1964 Porsche 356C Coupe – Outlaw

In last week’s post about the Porsche 356 I wrote about the way these cars have always struck me for their beauty and graceful, simple, designs. At this point in their history the 356 is less about performance and more about history and elegance. There are some, though, for whom the beauty of the car is not enough. Enter the Outlaw. At its root, the Outlaw philosophy is a tried and true method: take a vintage car, make minor exterior modifications to suit one’s taste and combine those with more modern modifications to the drivetrain. Add in some interior modifications to suit the car’s personality and you have an Outlaw. These were souped-up variants of a classic car. The degree of modification can vary significantly, both for the exterior and drivetrain, with some Outlaw models producing more than 200 hp to go along with modern suspension and braking. The example here is much more subtle featuring minor exterior changes, a bored 1.7 liter engine along with the requisite suspension and interior modifications. The base car here was a 1964 356C so it provides a nice comparison with the original model we featured last week.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1964 Porsche 356C Coupe on eBay