1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC

Update 7/10/18: Now with a lower $9,000 no reserve opening bid, much better photos and a black leather interior, the neat Jasmin Yellow Corrado 24V VR6 has been relisted relisted here

Update 3/11/18: The seller of this unique Corrado has relisted it again on a no reserve auction, but now with a higher $12,500 starting price.

Update 11/1/17: I was taken to task for my critique of the pricing on this example. The builder and many of his avid fans chimed in to offer more history and background of the build and its thoroughness. Additionally, the seller was able to point toward the $10,000 recent sale of a similar 24V modified Corrado to justify his pricing. It’s a comp that I hadn’t seen and certainly backs up his starting price argument. Thanks for the input to all our readership who know the seller and the build better than I did! -CJ

1992 was an interesting year of change at Volkswagen. At least for the next decade, it signaled the end of the hot water-cooled EA827-derived 4-cylinder models that had made it popular once again as a modern, efficient economy car that was capable of plenty of sport, too. 1992 was significant in this regard, because although the engine labored on for a bit, alongside the twin-cam, high-revving 16V GTI and GLI or the gutsy G60-supercharged Corrado came the new VR6 power unit. Displacing 2.8 liters, the new engine went without exotic forced-induction or peaky twin cams. Instead you just got low-end grunt and great noise, and 170-odd stampeding horses running across the front of your Volkswagen. In short order, the Passat, Jetta, GTI and even the EuroVan all moved to six cylinders.

1992 was even more notable because for the U.S. market it was the sole year where both the G60 and SLC VR6 were available together in the Corrado lineup. It was also unique because of the tones available; Corrados had been available previously in Nugget Yellow LK1B, but in 1992 it moved to Jasmin Yellow LK1D. It then promptly disappeared from the color catalog after few were ordered, making it one of the most infrequently seen tones on an already seldom seen car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC on eBay

Continue reading

Tuner Tuesday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe RAUH-Welt Begriff

I’ve featured a few of RAUH-Welt Begriff’s Porsche creations, but this one might be my favorite. It’s an interesting mix of old and new, borrowing its colors and interior aesthetic from vintage Porsche hues and fabrics, then wrapping that in a body that is anything but vintage 911. In addition, unlike many of RWB’s builds this one has the performance to complement the wildly aggressive design.

For this build they used a 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe. The design remains unmistakably that of Akira Nakai with its swooping hand-formed curves, very wide fenders, and huge wing. Under the hood this is a very different beast with the standard 3.6 liter flat-six now built to 3.8 liter RSR specs. I’m always curious if such statements mean precisely what they say because I believe that would mean around 350 hp from this engine. At the very least we can assume there’s going to be a decent bit of extra power going to the rear wheels.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe RAUH-Welt Begriff on eBay

Continue reading

Paint-to-Sample Lemon Yellow 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

I’ve been looking at a few yellow 911s over the past week and if we add in Carter’s Speed Yellow 968 then these bright yellow Porsches have been a little bit of a theme. I’m going to raise the bar some now and while I know it’s tough to top the rarity of that 968 I think this one certainly tries its best. We’ll definitely be raising the bar on price.

Here we see a beautiful paint-to-sample Lemon Yellow 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS. I’ve featured a few examples of the Carrera RS lately as now that it has passed the 25 year waiting period I’ve seen them come up for sale more frequently. It is one of my all-time favorite 911s, perhaps even being my all-time favorite though that seems to change with the season. Regardless, they are spectacular machines and this looks to be a spectacular example.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Lemon Yellow 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS at DJM Investments

Year: 1992
Model: 911 Carrera RS
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 28,867 km (17,937 mi)
Price: Inquire

In 1992, Porsche produced a super-lightweight, rear-wheel-drive only version of the 964 dubbed Carrera RS for the European market only. It was based on Porsche’s 911 “Carrera Cup” race car and harked back to the 2.7 and 3.0 RS and RSR models. It featured a revised version of the standard engine, titled M64/03 internally, with an increased power output of 260 bhp (194 kW; 264 PS) and lightweight flywheel coupled to the G50/10 transmission with closer ratios, asymmetrical Limited Slip Differential and steel syncromesh. A track-oriented suspension system with 40 mm (1.6 in) lower ride height, stiffer springs, shocks and adjustable stabilizer bars without power steering (RHD UK cars did have power steering).
A stripped-out interior devoid of power windows or seats, rear seats, air conditioning, cruise control, sound deadening or a stereo system (optionally fitted) and new racing-bucket front seats were part of the package. The trunk hood was made of aluminum, the chassis was seam welded and sound deadening was deleted. Wheels were made of magnesium and the glass was thinner in the doors and rear window. The Carrera RS is approximately 345 pounds (155 kg) lighter than the US version Carrera 2 model.

These cars were never delivered to the USA due to the idea that these cars were too track oriented despite being street cars for ROW (Rest of World). Today they are highly sought after due to the incredible road handling characteristics and the thrill of driving a car with your right foot and no added and heavy driving additives!! Lighter and much more fun to drive than the 993 RS and much more desirable and safe to drive than the initial RS built in 1973. The 964 RS Carrera will be the next generation of 1973 RS’s and, of course, being much faster, safer and fun to drive than the original RS from 1973 and future values will soon be near or at the level of a 1973 RS.

This is a very rare and highly sought after PAINT TO SAMPLE and FULLY ORIGINAL RS Carrera with only 28,867 KM’s from new. No modifications whatsoever and in AS NEW CONCOURS CONDITION. With ownership history from delivery date and in Paint to Sample this particular automobile is for the true collector and 911 enthusiast. Included in the sale are all tools, books, records, jack, gloves, and original spare. Finding a car in this condition is extremely hard to source and the added value bonus of a paint to sample car will always be rare and highly collectible for many years to come.

Price on Request

There isn’t a whole lot to say about this RS itself. Everything looks exactly as we’d hope from such a low-mileage collectible. It comes with all of its documentation as well. My only quibble – and this is more with how the car is spec’d than with its current presentation – is that the three-tone seats are the standard grey. I’d have loved if they matched the exterior. Perhaps since it was paint-to-sample this was not possible, though it’s rare that something isn’t possible from Porsche. If you have the money, they can usually find a way.

So how much might it cost? Recent auctions of low-mileage examples of the 964 Carrera RS have been selling in the mid- to upper-$200Ks. But those have been for fairly standard colors. There is a Rubystone RS of similar mileage priced at a whopping $408K, but it’s been around for a little while and to me may represent an outlier. I would expect this paint-to-sample RS to eclipse $300K without much problem. After that it really becomes a matter of how much a buyer wants it. There certainly aren’t many more like it (well, perhaps any more like it) and even those that are similar may not be in such fine condition.

-Rob

1992 Mercedes-Benz 300E Sportline

Usually when the Mercedes-Benz W124 is brought up it is all about the 500E, Cabriolet or sometimes the diesel. This is for good reason, of course. Lost in that discussion in the lowly 300E/E320 and “not-quite-500E” 400E/E420. But often forgotten is the 300E Sportline. The Sportline was an option on W124s and W201s for a few years in North America as a way to get your kicks out of a Mercedes-Benz sedan without ponying up over $80,000 (!) for a 500E. In all honesty, the option list wasn’t all that bad for the Sportline package. You got a bunch of different suspension components, wider wheels and tires, a quick ratio steering box, a smaller steering wheel and the same seats out of the 500E. Yes, that means that you did in fact get rear individual back seats with bolstering. That bad part is that you didn’t get any extra power out of the soon to be expired M103, but you take what you can get from the conservative Germans when they give it to you. Now 25 years later and most of the regular 300E cars are trashed, even finding a Sportline is a tough task. But this 1992 for sale on Long Island just might the one to snag up.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 300E Sportline on Long Island Craigslist

Year: 1992
Model: 300E Sportline
Engine: 3.0 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 132,500 mi
Price: $4,800

1992 Mercedes Benz 300E Sportline 132k Black on black leather original paint.
Excellent condition meticulously maintained. Real sweet car with no issues,
Drives nice, handles tight. It’s a Sportline.
Very clean interior and exterior. Needs nothing but a new caring home.
Preferably with a garage.
Up to date on all maintenance, well sorted.
Parts replaced in past 6000 miles from March of 2014
New tires 4 matching Michelins
Oil and filter every 2000 miles Rotella T6
EHA valve
Radiator Belt and Tensioner
Air Filter
Brake Fluid flush
Fuel Pumps Filter Hangers and Fuel Line
Water Pump Upper hose and Bypass Hose with Thermostat
Braided Stainless Brake Hoses
Cap Plugs Rotor Wires
Tranny Fluid and Filter
Motor Mounts and Tranny Mount
Shifter Bushings Front Flex Disk
Ball Joints and Front Struts
Ignition switch
Oil and Filter T6
Sway Bar Bushings
Fuel Injectors with seals and holders
Air Flow Boot and Idle Air Hoses
Valve Cover Gasket
Brake Fluid Flush
Tie Rods and Center Link with Damper
Rear Shocks Bilstein Sports
Oil and Filter T6
Voltage Regulator
Defrost Pod
Idler Arm
Fan Clutch
Oil and Filter T6
Coolant Flush Zerex
All with dates mileage and receipts
Needs a new home.
$4,800

Usually when I see these pop up for sale every so often they fall in the category of either someone has no idea what it is and thinks it’s just a regular lowly 300E or the enthusiast who knows what it is and treats it as such. Thankfully, the latter is true with this car. Looking at the Craigslist ad, this owner really loves this car and takes care of it as such. There is a laundry list a mile long with repairs and maintenance such as changing the oil every 2,000 miles. Probably not needed, but more power to him. This is the kind of old used Mercedes you want to buy. Everything is done, no surprises, no stories. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve bought cars or looked at cars that didn’t seem all that bad, then a year and a half later I’m still buying parts and checking things off a list that needs done.

At $4,800, this asking price is totally fair. You are paying a little bit of a premium, but it’s worth every penny. These cars in general don’t trade for that much more than a comparable 300E, which is kind of disappointing, but I understand. Those who want a W124 usually go big or go home. A regular 300E is unsatisfying to say the least when you know what the chassis is capable of, but the Sportline gives you a nice taste while saving you an easy $15,000 over a 500E. So if you have 500E tastes but can’t justify the cost, this 300E Sportline surely can give you some of that enjoyment.

– Andrew

Right Hooker Week: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Truth be told I wasn’t sure if a right-hand drive 964 Carrera RS actually existed. I was pretty sure I’d seen one previously, but couldn’t be sure I hadn’t just imagined it. But here one is: a Rubystone Red 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS with triple-tone Recaro seats and 58,900 miles on it. That’s a decent number of miles for a RS, yet its condition still looks quite good. Of course, the Carrera RS was never made available in the States, but they can now be imported. Sure, there are plenty of LHD examples available, but if you really want to take things to their extreme, why not just get a RHD one and really wow people?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on Classic Driver

Year: 1992
Model: 911 Carrera RS
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 58,900 mi
Price: £199,995 ($257,461)

The Porsche 911 964 Carrera RS was launched in 1992 and was considered a lightweight version of the Carrera 2 that could be used both on the road and the race track. Arguably, this was the most dynamic and agile 911 since the original version was launched in 1973. The engineers behind the project utilised the philosophy of removing weight and adding power when designing and engineering the car. Remarkably, nearly 175kg of weight was removed from the standard version as a result of using aluminium for the bonnet and doors as well as thinner glass for the windows.
All of the weight-saving measures added up and resulted in a vastly reduced overall mass. Luxuries such as back seats, power windows and armrests could all be disposed of and the increase in power came from a brand new lightweight flywheel and some other minor modifications. The flat-six engine produced 260 bhp and also fitted to the car was a limited-slip differential, modified suspension (with a 40mm lower ride height) and stiffer springs. In another weight-saving move, Porsche chose to remove all the sound deadening and manufactured the wheels from magnesium.
This RHD example was delivered to its first owner Mr Clifford of Worthing, West Sussex in June 1993 via dealer Rivervale Porsche. Finished in the rare 964 RS signature original combination of Rubystone Red over optional Triple-Tone Rubystone Recaro Bucket Seats, the following options were also applied from new, UK LUX Spec and Tinted Windows.
With no less than 14 stamps in the original service book, many from the main dealer who supplied the car, it has been maintained with a no expense spared approach from new, resulting in a superb condition to be expected throughout.
This 964 RS is presented in excellent and original condition having covered just 58,900 Miles, with just 4 prior owners. Accompanied by its original book pack as well as tools, spare wheel, supporting history file and Porsche Certificate of Authenticity confirming the car’s matching engine and gearbox numbers. This RS is ready to be enjoyed by its new owner immediately with viewings available at our showroom, which is based just outside London.

Rubystone is not everyone’s favorite color. You’re probably going to love it or hate it, with little in between. But like it or not it’s become almost an iconic color on the 964 RS. It might even be the color I see most often. The interior is equally as divisive. I’m a fan. I’m not going to say Rubystone is my favorite Porsche color by any means, but I do love the look on the RS. Here it actually looks somewhat subdued. I’m guessing that’s down to the foggy/cloudy lighting conditions. But it’s a fun color on what should be an amazingly fun car.

Everything here looks about as we’d expect of a RS, even with the higher miles. Though I am curious about the exhaust. The ad makes no mention of it being added on, but I’m pretty sure the standard RS has a single exhaust outlet. The 3.8 RS had dual exhaust, but not the 3.6. That’s probably worth inquiring about. The price of just under £200K (about $257K) seems fairly typical given the mileage. We certainly see lower mileage examples priced significantly higher.

Given pricing like this for a Carrera RS that’s already been imported, this one may be downright reasonable. It definitely has a few more miles and that dual exhaust may not be original, but the asking price here is a long way from $400K and if that is what it’s going to take to get one that’s already Stateside then perhaps going through the hassle yourself is the way to go. And heck you’d even have a RHD version!

-Rob

1992 Audi V8 quattro

While visually most people would have a hard time telling a 1991 and 1992 V8 quattro apart, there were a bunch of little changes throughout the model if you were paying attention. The easiest change to spot was the BBS RG forged wheels that carried over from the 1991 model. At 15 x 7.5″ with a 35mm offset, they filled out the widened arches nicely. The more pragmatic change was in badging; after two years of no model designation (one with nearly identical looking but very different cars underneath for sale), the company finally decided other people besides the owner should know what they were driving. V8 badges were added to the grill and left rear of the trunk, and a “quattro” badge returned to the right side of the lid. Much less noticeable was a more pronounced exhaust, with twin stainless outlets now emerging straight out instead of the 1990/1 down-turned tips.

Inside there were few changes; minor gauge movement had occurred between 1990 and 1992. Connolly leather seats were now standard (as were nearly all items on the V8), and the wood trim was upgraded. The V8 came standard with the Cold Weather package, sunroof, ABS, and BOSE radio. Gone was the option to row-your-own, as the manual was removed from the U.S. market. However, a light revision to the shift points along with an integral cooler meant that the 4-speed automatic in the ’92-94 models was more robust.

But the big change was under the hood, where a new ABH 4.2 liter all-aluminum V8 met the owner. With 276 horsepower and 295 lb.ft of torque, it was the most powerful Audi you could buy in 1992, and acceleration matched the manual and turbocharged S4. All of this luxury and speed cost; the sticker price was now up to $54,000. On paper, the V8 competed well against the competition from Stuttgart and Munich.

But in the recession of the early 1990s, coupled with the legacy of Audi’s scandals and rocky introduction to the super-luxury market meant the V8 was a slow seller. Despite upgrades, the ’92-’94 sold especially slowly; in total, only 518 4.2 models were sold in the U.S. compared to nearly 3,500 3.6 models. ’92 was the best seller with about half of those – 270 – moving here. Few remain in the condition of this Cyclamen Red Mica example though!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi V8 quattro on eBay

Continue reading

Roll the dice? 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E

Bet big to win big, right? Today might be one of those situations. What we are looking at is a 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E with a hair under 50,000 miles. This is obviously very good in the big picture. But the real pictures you are seeing show a different story. This monster W124 is so dirty you can’t tell the condition of the paint, the tires are nearly flat and the seller has no real information on the car other than it’s just been sitting in the driveway for at least a year.

Ready to gamble?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E on eBay

Year: 1992
Model: 500E
Engine: 5.0 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 49,396 mi
Price: No Reserve Auction

Low mileage because owner collected many cars.

Grille is 1993 version. Has been sitting in driveway at least 12 mos, battery may need to be replaced. Tires appear low. Can probably be driven after battery is charged. But current registration is for planned nonoperation. This is not an estate sale.

Interior of car is very new looking.

Previous license was 3CLH104 prior to a rear-end accident where license plate was lost.

The 500E is a dilemma if I’ve ever seen one. These are no doubt valuable cars and the current market isn’t slowing down on them. Any E500E that is in any kind of decent shape is usually bringing $12,000 right off the bat even for cars pushing the 200,000 mile mark. Once you start getting into lower mileage cars that are very well sorted you can hit $30,000 very easily and head all the way up to $150,000 for Jerry Seinfeld’s 500E.

A couple of things about this car I find interesting. First is that it has been updated to the 1994 facelift look. This is a modification that doesn’t come cheap so those that do it, usually love their 500E. Inside, the interior looks good enough with no major flaws although a bit dirty. Everything can be cleaned, but ripped seats, broken wood and cracked dashes are when things start getting expensive. But the real mystery is the actual mechanical condition. You can easily spend $10,000 trying to rehab one of these cars back to good health and unless you can actually go see this car in person, you are basically bidding blind. There is no indication of updated wiring harnesses, oil tube replacements, EZL condition and most importantly anything about the health of the transmission.

I’m really curious to see where this one ends up. You can basically fix everything wrong with these cars, but you can’t fix high miles. If bidding stays somewhere reasonable, which it probably won’t seeing as it’s at nearly $10,000 already, then it’ll be worth it to gamble on. But if someone pays over $20,000 and finds out it’s a total disaster? Well, hope the market keeps climbing with these.

– Andrew

1992 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.6

When I got my first job out of grad school, I needed a cheap daily driver to commute to work. Everyone told me to just buy a Honda and be done with it. But I knew that wasn’t going to work. I wanted something unusual, safe, classy and preferably German. And that’s how I came to buy a W201. I didn’t really know much about them at the time. But a nice looking example popped up for sale near me, and as soon as I drove it I was hooked. The 190E rides like a shrunken S-class: luxurious, sturdy and solid. The straight six motor is creamy and robust. And the design of the car is really quite handsome, under-appreciated even, especially when seen from the rear three-quarter angle. True, the 190E is not fast, the KE-Jetronic fuel injection system is a real pain when it goes wrong and, owing to the gearing on the old school four-speed automatic, the 2.6 is not as fuel efficient as it should be (the 2.3 isn’t much better either). Still, a nicely kept W201 can be a neat and satisfying entry point into budget-friendly German motoring. Provided you pick a good one.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.6 on Central NJ Craigslist

Continue reading

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

I’m going to move on from the 964 soon, but before I did I wanted to post one more. The Japanese Carrera 2 from earlier this week reminded me that the Carrera RS can now be legally imported so I couldn’t pass up the chance to feature one of those. Despite its rarity there are usually a few of these available at any given time. That does, of course, mean expanding your search quite far and even though they are available a few is just that, a few. So it still isn’t easy, but they are out there.

I wanted to find one that wasn’t too crazy expensive (though finding one below $200K seems very difficult so “expensive” is a bit relative here). There are some of those available if you want one as a collector, but I wanted to find one with some miles and that hopefully someone could drive. This also meant looking at something in a more standard color. And that’s what we see here with this Guards Red 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, located in Italy, with 81K kilometers on it.

If you do happen to desire one that’s a little more rare and more interesting, this one or this one could suit your needs. Both of those have similar miles to this one, but come in more daring colors. All of these should be great!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on Classic Driver

Year: 1992
Model: 911 Carrera RS
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 81,000 km (~ 50,332 mi)
Price: €190,000 (~ $217,000)

February 1992
Car in perfect condition.
The current owner (collector Porsche and Ferrari) possesses since 2000, and is the third owner.
The car has covered 81.000 kilometers.
Original engine and transmission.
Regular maintenance carried out at Porsche official workshops (the owner has all the documentation of the work performed).
Interiors in original black leather.
Original magnesium wheels.
Frame n° WPOZZZ96ZNS490843
Italian plate and document.
Car ready to change of ownership.

When released in 1992 the Carrera RS revived an iconic name that had lay dormant for nearly 20 years. Like any of Porsche’s cars bearing the RS moniker the 964 both raises performance and decreases the overall weight. Unlike the RS America produced for the US market, the RS truly is a light weight as it shed more than 300 lbs from the standard Carrera 2. Add in a revised suspension that moves beyond the standard sport suspension and you get one heck of a performer.

These cars possess one my favorite profiles of any air-cooled 911. Its hunkered down stance and curves give it a great look and for me it is only surpassed by the early 3.0 liter 930 in its appearance. It’s been a long wait for anyone who has had an eye on one of these but with the window now open we should see more of these great cars appearing Stateside. Given that they are very expensive and very collectible I’m not sure whether we really would see one on the road all that often, but one such as this with more than 50K miles on the clock certainly could absorb some additional miles without too much concern.

-Rob

Double Take: Porsche 964 3.3-liter Turbo

As promised, more 964s. Yesterday I featured the extra spicy Turbo 3.6 and today we’ll step back just a little to the original 964 Turbo. So I guess it’s 3 chilies on your Porsche menu rather than four. I’ll start by saying that I don’t feature these turbos perhaps as much as I’d like, but that is mostly because so many of those I come across are more or less the same. So many of them are Black or the occasional Guards Red with a Black or Tan interior and the mileage will be typical. There is nothing wrong with those cars per se, it’s just that once we’ve looked at one there isn’t as much to excite me for the next one.

Here we will look at two that do not come in one of those very standard colors. Ok, so the first one is still red, but Coral Red Metallic is much more rare, in fact I don’t know if I’ve come across any 964 in this color let alone a Turbo. So it’s different and different is good in this case. Let’s look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Coral Red Metallic 1992 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

Continue reading