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Tag: 1967

1967 BMW 2000CS

Stepping even a bit further back in BMW’s timeline, today we have a Neue Klasse Coupe. The E120 was as evolution of the Bertone 3200CS design from the early 1960s, but BMW’s design head – one very famous Mr. Wilhelm Hofmeister – certainly added his own distinctive flair. However, he wasn’t alone – some of the most famous car designers from the period had influence – from the aforementioned Bertone, Giugiaro, and of course Michelotti (designer of the 700 series as well) all had a hand.

While the lines looked exotic, underneath the chassis and drivetrain were borrowed straight from the more pedestrian Neue Klasse sedans. Power came from the venerable 2.0 inline-4 M10 fed by twin Solex carbs. The CS had the higher compression (9.3:1) 120 horsepower version, while the C and CA made due with 100. This was still a huge step for BMW, who lacked the capability to produce the complex body structure on its normal assembly lines. As a result, like its successors the E9 and early E24 models, the 2000C, CA and CS Coupes would be produced by Karmann in Osnabrück. A total of approximately 13,691 were produced between its 1965 launch and the takeover of the 2800CS introduction in 1968.

So, they’re old, a bit quirky-looking by BMW standards, and rare. That certainly makes for the potential for a collector car! And this one is claimed to be a mostly original survivor, to boot:

A Brief History of Cars
A Brief History of Cars

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 BMW 2000CS on eBay

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Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa


Update 11/13/18: This 912 Soft-window Targa sold for $50,217.99.

I began my post on a recent 993 Turbo S by stating, “this is everything.” In a very different way my reaction to this Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa is similar. For pure lust the Turbo S certainly wins the day, but some of the allure of that car was in the details and that is where the overlap lies with this 912. There is enough here to pore over that interested parties could spend hours simply looking through these pictures.

We’ll begin with the color. Golden Green is not a color I’ve seen before. It only was available for a couple years in the ’60s and generally isn’t one that we come across among the many PTS 911s that have been produced since. It is sort of in the vein of Lindgrün (also called Chartreuse) that was produced in the ’70s though Golden Green doesn’t look as bright to me. As the name suggests it possesses a yellow/gold hue to its non-metallic green. That golden hue allows it to change kind of dramatically from sun to shade. The pictures here do a pretty good job of capturing that transformation. This is said to be the only Soft-window Targa produced in 1967 in this color with only 4 others made in 1968. So it’s very rare. I don’t know how many Coupes might also exist, but as I said this is the first I have seen it so I’m guessing there aren’t many.

The other part of this is the Soft-window Targa itself, Porsche’s answer to what they thought would be the death of the open-roofed car. Such tragedies never befell the car industry and the soft rear window eventually was replaced with the glass rear with which we’re all very familiar on 911 Targas even to this day. But the SWT is an interesting design and interesting engineering answer to a potential problem. They make for great historical models and given their short production run are quite rare in themselves. So there’s a good bit going on here and the seller has provided quite a few pictures to document this Targa’s condition. Add to all of that it is up for auction without reserve.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Golden Green 1967 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

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1967 Mercedes-Benz 600

The last Mercedes-Benz 600 I looked at was a wonderful example that was originally owned by NBC Orchestra conductor Don Ricardo. It was a cool little story that was mostly complete and ready to keep being enjoyed by a new owner — as long as you had a big enough bank account. Today, I have another 600 but this has little information and being sold by the source themselves. Who is that source? None other than the Mercedes-Benz Classic Center. Sounds like a perfect situation to buy a car, right?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Mercedes-Benz 600 at Mercedes-Benz Classics

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1967 Porsche 911 Coupe

While not necessarily surprising given their age the early short-wheelbase 911s really do not come around that often, even relative to the later long-hood models. This one I think looks particularly good. This is a Polo Red 1967 Porsche 911 Coupe with a set of lovely black, white, and red houndstooth seat inserts in the interior that looks fantastic as a contrast to the Polo Red exterior.

1967 brought with it a couple changes to the 911 lineup. Of perhaps greatest importance is it marked the debut of the 911 Targa, which at this early stage was in the quirky soft-window form. The Targa would be a mainstay of the 911 lineup for nearly 30 years before going on a brief hiatus after a redesign for the 993. This also was the first year for the top-of-the-line 911S. Of course, neither of those things applies to this 911, which is a base model Coupe, but we might as well account for the available options. Another change, which this time does apply to this 911, was the replacement of the wood dash with an aluminum dash. For me that’s a little bit to the ’67 911’s detriment as those wood dashes were so good looking, but the aluminum look perhaps provides a little more of a sporting feel.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 911 Coupe on eBay

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1967 Porsche 911S Coupe

While the number of 911 models Porsche produces has grown considerably over the years, catering to just about every possible combination you can conceive, a consistent moniker has stood out for those seeking higher performance: the S. Whether the 911S, the Carrera S, the Turbo S, or the various RS models (those count right?) that single letter has let buyers know that it would be a model catering more to their spirited side rather than to comfort. While the S was on hiatus during the late-70s and all of the ’80s it returned in Turbo S form (and Carrera RS form) for the 964 and then finally found itself reattached to the Carrera itself with the Carrera S and 4S, both of which debuted as part of the 993 line. It hasn’t left us since.

But it began here, in 1967, with the 911S. In the ’60s, buyers initially only had access to the base 911. That was it, one choice. In 1967 the lineup expanded with the addition of the 911S and the Soft-window Targa, available both in S trim and without. The S brought with it the sort of features we’d expect: More power (up to 160 hp from the base 911’s 130), upgraded shocks and brakes, along with a rear anti-roll bar and Fuchs wheels. Leatherette on the dash and wheel provided interior upgrades. The 911 had become sportier. And then it wasn’t. For 1968 Porsche gave us the 911L and removed the S from the US lineup. Thankfully, 1969 saw its return, now placed above the entry-level 911T and mid-grade 911E, and all 911s had a longer wheelbase.

That makes the one-year-only short-wheelbase 911S a pretty special car and here we find one for sale: an Irish Green 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in Washington, with a reported 29,177 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay

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