1978 Porsche 930

The 1978 model year was a big change for Porsche 911 Turbo as the turbocharged 3.0 liter was swapped out for a 3.3 liter with an addition of an air-to-air intercooler. That made an already dangerous car into one that was truly capable of ruining not only your day, but your life. Lifting while going around a corner would result in some pretty nasty snap oversteer, and if you aren’t ready for it or had some so so tires, watch out. Some people loved the absolute rawness and danger of the car, but personally I’ll take a pass. Still, every 930 from 1975 to 1989 is sought after no matter what the condition, thus resulting in big prices.

This 1978 might look familiar as we took a look at it a few years ago from when it was for sale under previous ownership. It is finished in paint to sample Medium Green Metallic, which pointed out previously is an old GM color. It has some wild green carpets to match, which of course results in a big price tag. Funny thing is, the price on this one actually went down.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

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1978 Mercedes-Benz 450SEL

As they years go by, it seems less and less likely that the W116 Mercedes-Benz S-Class will get its due. The newest examples are now 40 years-old, so if they aren’t in full blown classic status might now, they might not ever be. Don’t get me wrong, the best of the best examples still sell for very good money, but this is clearly not a case of rising tides lifts all ships. The holy-grail 6.9 cars struggle to sell if they aren’t in perfect condition both cosmetically and mechanically, because honestly they just are worth the trouble and money of fooling with at this stage. The non-6.9 V8 cars seem to struggle because they aren’t the 6.9 and why invest in one of those for when not much more money you buy a 6.9. I even say this as someone who owns and loves a W116, a 300SD no less, but I see the reality in owning these cars. So naturally when I see a seemingly nice W116 come up sale, I always want to take a peek to see what is out there. This 1978 450SEL up for sale outside of Chicago looks nice enough, but I have some questions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Mercedes-Benz 450SEL on eBay

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1978 Mercedes-Benz 240D

Here is a real odd ball. This is a European-spec 1978 Mercedes-Benz 240 for with some really interesting modifications. The early W123 looks to be fitted with some kind of aftermarket bumpers and side skirts, European hubcaps from a W126 S-Class, a bunch of painted black trim, and probably the worst placement for a third brake light I’ve ever seen. It supposedly has just 51,000 miles and is even fitted with Michelin XWX, a tire that if fitted to a W123 can often double the value of the entire car. I have a whole lot of questions, and it looks not like many answers.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Mercedes-Benz 240D on eBay

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1978 Porsche 928

When I was about 5 years old, my father took me to the Porsche dealership. Rows of new arrivals from Zuffenhausen lined up, a cornucopia of Easter egg-colored speed machines. In 1983, the low, organic, flowing shapes of the 911 and 944 stood in vast contrast to the bulk of three-box designs that proliferated the marketplace. But there was one shape that really stuck out to me Ė the 928.

In 1983, Porsche hadnít yet abandoned its hope that the 928 would ascend to the top of the Porsche model lineup, and because of this I donít remember seeing any 928s outside. Where I did see them was inside the showroom, where I distinctly remember one residing. My father was taken by the 911 (still is, to this day), and perhaps it was a father-versus-son stereotypical response, but the air-cooled model looked old and antiquated. The 928 was, both literally and figuratively, the antithesis of the 911. Water-cooled, front-engined, Grand Touring. It looked like a spaceship both inside and out. Clearly, this was the future I was witnessing.

Yet the 928, for all its press and relative market success, never caught completely on. It was never able to wrest the crown from the 911 as the signature model for Porsche. But what is perhaps most surprising to me is that it is one of the few cars that today, over forty years gone from its design phase, that unlike basically every other car model produced in the 1970s and 1980s, it still looks futuristic today. Okay, admittedly, the plastics have aged, tiny wheels with big, comfy side walls are no longer the norm and flush-fitted windows, lights, locks and antenna would clean the design up significantly. But compare this design to a few contemporaries, for a moment Ė the 1976 Chrysler New Yorker, the Toyota Cressida, or the Fiat 128. Three different nations, three different versions of the present, none anywhere near as revolutionary as the design that sits here:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 928 on 928Classics.com

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1978 Porsche 924

In its second full year for production, Porsche’s entry-level 924 model sped out of the gate – at least, in terms of sales. Some 11,638 traded in 1978, the model’s single most successful year by quite a margin. In fact, if you find an early non-Turbo 924, odds are it’ll be a ’78 since about 30% were when new. Obviously, the appeal of a (relatively) inexpensive Porsche worked; consider that even in the heyday 80s, Porsche never sold more than 2,700 928s a year here – often quite less – and the 924 comprised about 70% of the firms sales in the 1970s. This is the model that kept the lights on, Mr. Turbo Carrera.

Of course, by itself that doesn’t make an early 924 excited, nor is it solely a compelling reason to buy one. But there were some neat options for the early 924, not least of which was the Turbo. There were also a plethora of limited edition models, from the most famous Martini World Championship model to the Sebring ’79 edition, the ’78 Limited Edition, the M471 S models and the Weissach Commemorative Edition to consider. And that’s if you choose to ignore the much better later 924S model, too!

This car is none of those models. Yet, I think it’s still worth a look, so let’s see why:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 924 on eBay

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1978 Volkswagen Brasilia LS

Do you ever wonder ‘What if VW had decided to make the Golf platform develop from the Beetle rather than the Audi 50?

Me either. But it’s an interesting thought exercise, and what’s interesting is that we actually have an example of what could have been. That’s because Volkswagen do Brasil did produce a hatchback successor to the Beetle, and here it is – the Brasilia. The Brazilian branch of VW utilized a Karmann Ghia floor, a 1600 cc Beetle motor and borrowed the styling from the Type 4s to create a small 3- and 5-door hatchback.

It was reasonably successful, too – Volkswagen do Brasil reportedly sold somewhere north of 1,000,000 of them over a ten year production cycle from 1973-1982. They were sold primarily in Central and South America, never making it past the Rio Grande officially, but kits of the Brasilia were also sent to Africa. The Brasilia remains the only mass-produced air-cooled rival to the Beetle, amazingly. Today, an absolutely pristine example is up on eBay:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Volkswagen Brasilia LS on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1978 Porsche 930 with 25,453 miles

Update 10/19/18: This Porsche 930 has been relisted with a reserve auction ending 10/22/18 and the seller has provided a link to a picture gallery.

Let’s continue the theme from yesterday’s 928 Weissach and look at another older Porsche in fantastic original condition and with very few miles. As the seller describes, there are a couple of flaws with this one so I don’t know that we’d place it on the same plane of perfection as the 928, but it still looks incredibly good by any standard.

This is a paint-to-sample Sienna Brown Metallic 1978 Porsche 930, located in Arizona, with Cork leather interior, sport seats, and only 25,453 miles on it. We love the 930 around here as I’m sure everyone is aware. 1978 was the first year for the larger displacement 3.3 liter engine and intercooler so you’re getting 20 more horses compared with the earlier models along with larger 4-piston brakes to help rein everything in. But it’s obviously still very early in the 930’s production life so a ’78 is pretty raw and a few pounds lighter than the later examples. We’ve seen a few very low mileage and original examples cross our pages over the years and they’re always a treat to come across. They’re also very rare as most 930s from this period, quite understandably, have quite a few more miles and haven’t always been well cared for.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

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1978 Barkas B1000 Pickup

And now for something completely different.

Just left of zero of you will have ever heard the name Barkas, and yes – it’s German. Well, at least technically it’s German, because it was built in half of Germany. And if you had to venture a guess, which half would you suppose that would be?

That’s right! While the Trabant was the people’s car, the Barkas was the worker’s truck. Produced starting in the late 1950s in Chemnitz Karl-Marx-Stadt, the Barkas stole some technology from DKW, who had moved their pre-War headquarters from Zschopau to that fatefully renamed city in 1932 when they joined the Auto Union. Under the “hood” was the same 0.9 inline-3 two stroke you’d find in a DKW F91 and (rather unsurprisingly) the Wartburg, which also stole all the DKW tech. The drivetrain was borrowed, too, meaning that unlike the Volkswagen T-models, these vans were front wheel drive. The layout left Industrieverband Fahrzeugbau Barkas with the flexibility to create all sorts of configurations right up until they (and, the GDR) closed their doors in 1991; from mini-buses to delivery vans, from semi-trucks to even a pickup:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Barkas B1000 Pickup on eBay

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1978 Porsche 911SC Backdate RSR Replica

I am going to assume this car has made the rounds over the past couple months, but this was the first time I came across it so for me it’s new. This again falls into the category of cars I like quite a bit, but the asking price doesn’t make sense. In this case, I think this is one of the better examples of this particular breed of 911, i.e. a backdated Carrera drawing inspiration from the 1973 Carrera RS and RSR, that I’m sure will turn heads anywhere it goes.

While they weren’t the first to do it Singer brought these builds into wider recognition with their bespoke “reimagined” 911 combining modern performance with vintage long-hood 911 aesthetics. They’re highly sought after packages and can be very expensive. From those who have seen and driven them they are works of art with performance to match. James May referred to them as a love letter to a car – taking all of the best aspects of the 911 and combining them into a single machine. Over the years it has seemed like others have hoped to emulate the Singer model, but few really compare.

This, of course, isn’t a Singer. Rather than the 964 off which a Singer is based, this 911 began its life as a Silver 1978 Porsche 911SC Coupe. Fully stripped and disassembled the entire car was refreshed and rebuilt. It now possesses a slightly more modern 3.2 liter flat-6 from the 3.2 Carrera, the wider rear of the 930, and the impact bumpers are gone. It looks great! Power should be increased over the standard Carrera, though we aren’t told what exactly it’s putting out right now. So you get great looks and better performance. How much is all of that worth?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 911SC Backdate RSR Replica on Excellence Magazine

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1978 Porsche 930

I’ve been seeing a number of Petrol Blue Metallic 911s over the past few months. All have been the 911SC in both Coupe and Targa form so this 1978 Porsche 930 represents a slight departure from what has been the norm for this very attractive shade of blue. Petrol Blue wasn’t available very long, only for a couple years at the end of the ’70s, and it isn’t one that I can recall seeing as a paint-to-sample selection. In that regard, it sort of came and went so if you are a fan of this slightly darker version of metallic blue then there aren’t a lot of options for you outside of this period.

On the lines of the 930 the mix of darkness and metallic shine work well together and suit the curves and accent pieces better than on the standard 911. This one looks in pretty good shape and the sellers have provided a good bit of detail in the ad to help us understand its overall condition. This one isn’t being positioned as a concours car so perhaps it’s one that you could spend some enjoyable time with behind the wheel.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 at Fantasy Junction

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